of 29

Aed200 Appendix A

Published on June 2017 | Categories: Documents | Downloads: 7 | Comments: 0

Comments

Content

APPENDIX A

State Certification and Licensure Offices throughout the United States A teaching certificate or license is valid only in the state for which it is issued. Certification and testing requirements are never static. States are changing requirements constantly. If you are planning to move to another state, you should contact that state’s certification/licensure office as the first step. Below are websites to guide you. When you contact a state office, indicate the type of certificate you are receiving, your state, and the tests you have taken. You may also find information at www.nasdtec.org, and click on the Interstate Agreement to look at states that cooperate with licensure transfer. School districts that want to employ you may also have methods of hiring you on a temporary license for 1–2 years. Alabama www.alsde.edu/html/sections/section_detail.asp? section=66& Alaska www.educ.state.ak.us/teachercertification Arizona www.ade.state.az.us/certification Arkansas http://arkedu.state.ar.us/teachers/index.html California www.ctc.ca.gov or http://www.calteach.com Colorado www.cde.state.co.us/index_license.htm Connecticut www.state.ct.us/sde/dtl/cert/index.htm Delaware www.doe.state.de.us District of Columbia www.k12.dc.us/dcps/teachdc/certification.html

Illinois www.isbe.net/teachers.htm Indiana www.in.gov/psb Iowa www.state.ia.us/educate/programs/boee/index.html Kansas www.ksbe.state.ks.us/cert/cert.html Kentucky www.kyepsb.net/certinfo.html Louisiana www.louisianaschools.net/lde/index.html Maine www.usm.maine.edu/cehd/etep/certify.htm Maryland http://certification.msde.state.md.us Massachusetts www.doe.mass.edu/educators/e_license.html Michigan www.michigan.gov/mde Minnesota www.education.state.mn.us/html/intro_licensure.htm Mississippi www.academploy.com/cert/certms.htm Missouri www.dese.mo.gov/divteachqual/teachcert/index.html Montana www.opi.state.mt.us/index.html Nebraska www.nde.state.ne.us/tcert/tcmain.html Nevada www.academploy.com/cert/certnv.htm New Hampshire www.academploy.com/cert/certnh.htm

Georgia www.gapsc.com/TeacherCertification.asp

New Jersey www.state.nj.us/njded/educators/license/index.html

Hawaii http://doe.k12.hi.us/teacher/index.htm

New Mexico www.sde.state.nm.us/div/ais/lic/index.html

Idaho www.sde.state.id.us/certification

New York http://usny.nysed.gov/teachers/teachercertlic.html

484

www.ablongman.com/johnson13e

Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by Allyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

Florida www.fldoe.org/edcert

North Carolina www.ncpublicschools.org/employment.html

Texas www.sbec.state.tx.us/SBECOnline/default.asp

North Dakota www.state.nd.us/espb/

Utah www.usoe.k12.ut.us/cert/require/reqs.htm

Ohio www.ode.state.oh.us/teaching-profession/ teacher/certification_licensure

Vermont www.state.vt.us/educ/new/html/maincert.html Virginia www.pen.k12.va.us/VDOE/newvdoe/teached.html

Oklahoma www.octp.org/octp/index.html Oregon www.ode.state.or.us/supportservices/careers.htm Pennsylvania www.pde.state.pa.us/pde_internet/site/default.asp Rhode Island www.ridoe.net South Carolina www.scteachers.org/index.cfm South Dakota www.state.sd.us/deca/account/opa

West Virginia http://wvde.state.wv.us/certification Wisconsin www.dpi.state.wi.us/dpi/dlsis/tel/index.html Wyoming www.k12.wy.us/ptsb United States Department of Defense Dependents Schools www.odedodea.edu/pers Source: Locating U.S. State Certification Offices. 2004 AAEE Job Search Handbook, American Association for Employment in Education, Inc.

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

Tennessee www.state.tn.us/education/lic_home.htm

Washington www.k12.wa.us/certification

State Certification and Licensure Offices throughout the United States

485

Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by A llyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

APPENDIX B

Code of Ethics of the Education Profession PREAMBLE The educator, believing in the worth and dignity of each human being, recognizes the supreme importance of the pursuit of the truth, devotion to excellence, and the nurture of the democratic principles. Essential to these goals is the protection of freedom to learn and to teach and the guarantee of equal educational opportunity for all. The educator accepts the responsibility to adhere to the highest ethical standards. The educator recognizes the magnitude of the responsibility inherent in the teaching process. The desire for the respect and confidence of one’s colleagues, of students, of parents, and of the members of the community provides the incentive to attain and maintain the highest possible degree of ethical conduct. The code of Ethics of the Education Profession indicates the aspiration of all educators and provides standards by which to judge conduct. The remedies specified by the NEA and/or its affiliates for the violation of any provision of this Code shall be exclusive and no such provision shall be enforceable in any form other than the one specifically designated by the NEA and/or its affiliates.

PRINCIPLE I COMMITMENT TO THE STUDENT The educator strives to help each student realize his or her potential as a worthy and effective member of society. The educator therefore works to stimulate the spirit of inquiry, the acquisition of knowledge and understanding, and the thoughtful formulation of worthy goals. In fulfillment of the obligation to the student, the educator—

486

www.ablongman.com/johnson13e

Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by Allyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

1. Shall not unreasonably restrain the student from independent action in the pursuit of learning. 2. Shall not unreasonably deny the student’s access to varying points of view. 3. Shall not deliberately suppress or distort subject matter relevant to the student’s progress. 4. Shall make reasonable effort to protect the student from conditions harmful to learning or to health and safety. 5. Shall not intentionally expose the student to embarrassment or disparagement.

6. Shall not on the basis of race, color, creed, sex, national origin, marital status, political or religious beliefs, family, social or cultural background, or sexual orientation, unfairly— a. Exclude any student from participation in any program b. Deny benefits to any student c. Grant any advantage to any student 7. Shall not use professional relationships with students for private advantage. 8. Shall not disclose information about students obtained in the course of professional service unless disclosure serves a compelling professional purpose or is required by law.

PRINCIPLE II COMMITMENT TO THE PROFESSION The education profession is vested by the public with a trust and responsibility requiring the highest ideals of professional service. In the belief that the quality of the services of the education profession directly influences the nation and its citizens, the educator shall exert every effort to raise professional standards, to promote a climate that encourages the exercise of professional judgment, to achieve conditions that attract persons worthy of the trust to careers in education, and to assist in preventing the practice of the profession by unqualified persons. In fulfillment of the obligation to the profession, the educator— 9. Shall not in an application for a professional position deliberately make a false statement or fail to disclose a material fact related to competency and qualifications. 10. Shall not misrepresent his/her professional qualifications. 11. Shall not assist any entry into the profession of a person known to be unqualified in respect to character, education, or other relevant attribute. 12. Shall not knowingly make a false statement concerning the qualifications of a candidate for a professional position. 13. Shall not assist a noneducator in the unauthorized practice of teaching. 14. Shall not disclose information about colleagues obtained in the course of professional service unless disclosure serves a compelling professional purpose or is required by law. 15. Shall not knowingly make false or malicious statements about a colleague. 16. Shall not accept any gratuity, gift, or favor that might impair or appear to influence professional decisions or action.

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

Adopted by the NEA 1975 Representative Assembly

Code of Ethics of the Education Profession

487

Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by A llyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

APPENDIX C

Teaching Job Websites

The Web has quickly become the major resource for finding education vacancies: through your college’s career center website, school district websites, and state departments of education or related organizations. Many commercial sites also exist; be aware that some may have fees attached. These addresses are current as of July 2002, but may change. AAEE sponsors two web-based services. First is Project Connect, a year-round vacancy listing service. Just go to www.aaee.org, click on Project Connect and follow the links. You will need a username (teacher) and password (aswan) to search for positions.

Iowa www.iowaeducationjobs.com

Alabama www.alsde.edu/html/JobVacancies.asp?footer=general

Massachusetts www.doe.masss.edu/jobs

Alaska www.akeducationjobs.com Arizona www.arizonaeducationjobs.com Arkansas www.as-is.org/classifieds California www.calteach.com Colorado https://gateway.cde.state.co.us/portal/page?_pageid= 33,34440&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL

Kansas www.kansasteachingjobs.com Kentucky www.kde.state.ky.us Louisiana www.louisianaschools.net/lde/index.html Maine www.state.me.us/education/jobs1.htm Maryland www.msde.state.md.us

Michigan http://mtn.merit.edu/joblistings.html Minnesota www.mnasa.org/school_jobs Mississippi www.mde.k12.ms.us/mtc/vacancy.htm Missouri www.moteachingjobs.com Montana http://jobsforteachers.opi.state.mt.us Nebraska www.nebraskaeducationjobs.com

Delaware www.teachdelaware.com

Nevada www.nde.state.nv.us/hrt/hr/employment_department.html

Florida www.teachinflorida.com

New Hampshire www.ed.state.nh.us/about/employ.htm

Georgia www.teachgeorgia.org

New Jersey www.njhire.com

Hawaii http://doe.k12.hi.us/personnel/jobopportunities.htm

New Mexico www.nmsba.org

Idaho www.jobservice.us/iw/jobsearch/js.asp

New York www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/index.html

Illinois www.isbe.state.il.us

North Carolina www.dpi.state.nc.us/employment.html

Indiana http://ideanet.doe.state.in.us/peer/welcome.html

North Dakota https://onestop.jobsnd.com

488

www.ablongman.com/johnson13e

Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by Allyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

Connecticut www.state.ct.us/sde

Utah www.utaheducationjobs.com

Oklahoma www.sde.state.ok.us/pro/job.html

Vermont www.state.vt.us/educ

Oregon www.ospa.k12.or.us

Virginia www.pen.k12.va.us/VDOE/JOVE/home.shtml

Pennsylvania www.teaching.state.pa.us/teaching/site/default.asp

Washington www.wateach.com

Rhode Island www.ridoe.net/teachers/ed_employment.htm

West Virginia http://wvde.state.wv.us/jobs

South Carolina www.cerra.org/scctr_jobbank_submit.asp

Wisconsin www.wisconsin.gov/state/app/employment

South Dakota www.state.sd.us/deca/jobs.htm

Wyoming http://onestop.state.wy.us/appview/tt_home.asp

Tennessee www.state.tn.us/education/mtjobs.htm

United States Department of Defense Dependents Schools www.odedodea.edu/pers

Texas www.sbec.state.tx.us

Source: Job Websites. 2004 AAEE Job Search Handbook, American Association for Employment in Education, Inc.

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

Ohio www.ode.state.oh.us/jobs

Teaching Job Websites

489

Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by A llyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

APPENDIX D

Important Dates in the History of Western Education ca. 4000 B.C.E. ca. 2000 1200 479–338 469–399 445–431 427–346 404 384–322 336–323 303 167 146 C.E. 31–476 35–95 40–120 70 476 734–804 800 980–1037 1100–1300 1126–1198 ca. 1150 1209 1225–1274 1295 1384 ca. 1400 ca. 1423 ca. 1456 1460–1536 1483–1546 1487 1491–1556 1492 ca. 1492 ca. 1500 1517

490

www.ablongman.com/johnson13e

Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by Allyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

1519–1521 1534 1536

Written language developed First known schools Trojan War Period of Greek brilliance Socrates Greek Age of Pericles Plato Fall of Athens Aristotle Ascendancy of Alexander the Great A few private Greek teachers set up schools in Rome First Greek library in Rome Fall of Corinth: Greece fell to Rome Empire of Rome Quintilian Plutarch Destruction of Jerusalem Fall of Rome in the West Alcuin Charlemagne crowned Emperor Avicenna Crusades Averroes Universities of Paris and Bologna Cambridge founded St. Thomas Aquinas Voyage of Marco Polo Order of Brethren of the Common Life founded Thirty-eight universities; 108 by 1600 Printing invented First book printed Erasmus Martin Luther Vasco da Gama discovered African route to India Ignatius of Loyola Columbus landed in America Colonists began exploiting Native Americans 250 Latin grammar schools in England Luther nailed theses to cathedral door; beginning of Reformation Magellan first circumnavigated the globe Founding of Jesuits Sturm established his Gymnasium in Germany, the first classical secondary school

1568 1592–1670 1601 1618 1620 1635 1636 1642 1632–1704 1647 ca. 1600s 1661 1672 1684 1685 1697 1700–1790 1712–1778 1723 1746–1827 1751 1758–1843 1762 1775–1783 1776–1841 1782–1852 1778–1870 1789 1796–1859 1798 1799–1815 1804 1806 1811–1900 1819 1821 1821 1823 1825 1826 1827 1837 1839

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

1855 1856–1915 1857–1952 1861–1865 1861

Indian school established in Cuba by the Society of Jesus Johann Comenius English Poor Law established principle of tax-supported schools Holland had compulsory school law Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts, settled Boston Latin Grammar School founded Harvard founded Massachusetts law of 1642 encouraged education John Locke Massachusetts law of 1647 compelled establishment of schools Hornbooks evolved First newspaper in England First teacher-training class in France, Father Demia, France Brothers of the Christian Schools founded First normal school, de la Salle, Rheims, France First teacher training in Germany, Francke’s Seminary, Halle Benjamin Franklin Jean-Jacques Rousseau Indian student house opened by College of William and Mary Johann Pestalozzi Benjamin Franklin established first academy in the United States Noah Webster Rousseau’s Émile published Revolution, United States Johann Herbart Friedrich Froebel Emma Willard Adoption of Constitution, United States Horace Mann Joseph Lancaster developed monitorial plan of education Ascendancy of Napoleon, Waterloo Pestalozzi’s Institute at Yverdon established First Lancastrian School in New York Henry Barnard Dartmouth College Decision First American high school Troy Seminary for Women, Emma Willard; first higher education for women in United States First private normal school in United States, founded by Rev. Hall in Concord, Vermont Labor unions came on the scene Froebel’s The Education of Man published Massachusetts law compelled high schools Massachusetts had first state board, Horace Mann first secretary First public normal school in United States, Lexington, Massachusetts First kindergarten in United States, based on German model, founded by Margarethe Meyer Schurz at Oshkosh, Wisconsin Booker T. Washington John Dewey Civil War Oswego (New York) Normal School, Edward Sheldon Important Dates in the History of Western Education

491

Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by A llyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

1862 1868 1870–1952 1872 1875–1955 1888 1892 1896–1980 1904–1990 1909–1910 ca. 1910 1917 1932–1940 1941 1941 1942

1944–1946

1945

ca. 1946–1947 1948

1948 1950 1952 1954 1954 1957 1958 1959 1961 1961 1961 1962

1964 1965

492

Appendix D

Important Dates in the History of Western Education

www.ablongman.com/johnson13e

Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by Allyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

1963 1963 1964

Morrill Land Grant Act: college of engineering, military science, agriculture in each state Herbartian Society founded Maria Montessori Kalamazoo Decision made high schools legal Mary Bethune Teachers College, Columbia University, founded Committee of Ten established Jean Piaget B. F. Skinner First junior high schools established at Berkeley, California, and Columbus, Ohio First junior colleges established at Fresno, California, and Joliet, Illinois The Smith-Hughes Act encouraged agriculture, industry, and home economics education in the United States The Eight-Year Study of thirty high schools completed by the Progressive Education Association Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor Lanham Act Progressive Education Association published the findings of the Eight-Year Study; reported favorably on the modern school Legislation by 78th U.S. Congress provided subsistence allowance, tuition fees, and supplies for the education of veterans of World War II, the GI Bill The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) initiated efforts to improve educational standards throughout the world Beginning of U.S. “baby boom”; eventually caused huge increase in school enrollments McCollum v. Board of Education; U.S. Supreme Court ruled it illegal to release children for religious classes in public school buildings Fulbright programs began; by 1966 involved 82,500 scholars in 136 nations National Science Foundation founded GI Bill’s educational benefits extended to Korean War veterans U.S. Supreme Court decision required eventual racial integration of public schools Cooperative Research Program Soviet Union launched Sputnik Federal Congress passed the National Defense Education Act James B. Conant wrote The American High School Today Federal court ruled de facto racial segregation illegal Peace Corps established Approximately four million college students in the United States In Engle v. Vitale, U.S. Supreme Court ruled compulsory prayer in public school illegal Vocational Education Act Manpower Development and Training Act Economic Opportunity Act provided federal funds for such programs as Head Start Civil Rights Act Elementary and Secondary Education Act allowed more federal funds for public schools

1965 1966 1966 1966 1966 1967 1972 1972 1973

1975 1975 1979 1980 1983 1983

1983 1983

ca. 1980–1984 1984

1984 1984

1985 1986 1986 1989 1990 1992

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

1994 ca. 1990s 2001 2001 2003

Higher Education Act GI Bill’s educational benefits extended to Vietnam war veterans One million Americans travel abroad U.S. International Education Act Coleman Report suggested that racially balanced schools did not necessarily provide a better education Education Professions Development Act Indian Education Act, designed to help Native Americans help themselves Title IX Education Amendment outlawing discrimination on the basis of sex In Rodriguez v. San Antonio Independent School, U.S. Supreme Court ruled that a state’s system for financing schools did not violate the Constitution although there were large disparities in per-pupil expenditure. Indochina Migration and Refugee Assistance Act (Public Law 94-23) Public Law 94-142, requiring local districts to provide education for children with special needs Department of Education Act U.S. Secretary of Education position became a cabinet post High School: A Report on Secondary Education in America by the Carnegie Foundation A Nation at Risk: The Imperative for Educational Reform, report by the National Commission on Excellence in Education Task Force on Education for Economic Growth, Action for Excellence, Education Commission of the States Report Task Force on Federal Elementary and Secondary Education Policy, Making the Grade, the Twentieth Century Fund Report Fundamentalist religious movement advocating prayer in the schools and teaching of Biblical creation story Public Law 98-377 added new science and mathematics programs, magnet schools, and equal access to public schools Perkins Vocational Education Act to upgrade vocational programs in schools Public Law 98-558 created new teacher education scholarships and continued Head Start and Follow Through programs NCATE Redesign Standards published Holmes Group report published Carnegie Report of the Task Force on Teaching as a Profession Presidential Education Summit with governors U.S. Supreme Court decision to allow Bible clubs in schools U.S. Supreme Court decision finds officially sanctioned prayers or invocations unconstitutional National Educational Goals: 2000 adopted by federal government Development of school voucher plans and charter schools President Bush promises to push school reform Federal No Child Left Behind Act U.S. Supreme Court reaffirms and clarifies affirmative action

Important Dates in the History of Western Education

493

Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by A llyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

APPENDIX E

Professional Education Associations: A Selected List American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance (AAHPERD) www.aahperd.org American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) www.aapt.org American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA) www.acla.org American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) www.actfl.org

International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) www.iste.org International Technology Education Association (ITEA) www.iteawww.org Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) www.ccsso.org/Projects/interstate_new_teacher_ assessment_and_support_consortium/780.cfm Modern Language Association of America (MLA) www.mla.org

American Federation of Teachers (AFT) www.aft.org

Music Teachers National Association (MTNA) www.mtna.org

American Library Association (ALA) www.ala.org

National Art Education Association (NAEA) www.naea-reston.org

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) www.asha.org

National Association for Bilingual Education (NABE) www.nabe.org

American Association for Health Education (AAHE) www.aahperd.org/aahe

National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) www.naeyc.org

Association for Childhood Education International (ACEI) www.acei.org

National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) www.nagc.org

Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communications (AEJMC) www.aejmc.org

National Association for Multicultural Education (NAME) www.nameorg.org

Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) www.aect.org

National Association for Sport & Physical Education (NASPE) www.aahperd.org/naspe

Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD) www.ascd.org

National Association of Biology Teachers (NABT) www.nabt.org

Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI) www.acsi.org

National Association of Episcopal Schools (NAES) www.naes.org National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) www.nbpts.org

Education International (EI) www.ei-ie.org/main/english/index.html

National Business Education Association (NBEA) www.nbea.org

International Reading Association (IRA) www.reading.org

National Catholic Educational Association (NCEA) www.ncea.org

494

www.ablongman.com/johnson13e

Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by Allyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) www.cec.sped.org

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) www.ncate.org National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) www.ncss.org National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) www.ncte.org National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) www.nctm.org

National Middle School Association (NMSA) www.nmsa.org National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) www.nsta.org Phi Delta Kappa www.pdkintl.org Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) www.tesol.org

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

National Education Association (NEA) www.nea.org

Professional Education Associations: A Selected List

495

Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by A llyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

496 Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by Allyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

Name Index

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

Abel, Donald C., 332 Abraham, 327 Abram, Percy, 480 Abrami, Philip C., 459 Acs, Gregory, 108 Adams, John, 167, 262 Adams, Norish, 341 Addams, Jane, 254 Adler, Mortimer, 340 Albert, Bill, 108 Alcuin, 242 Alexander, Herbert G., 310, 332 Allen, Dwight, 293 Ames, Carole A., 365 Amundson, Ed, 414 Anderson, Sarah, 74 Apple, Michael W., 109 Aquinas, Thomas, 242–243 Aristotle, 239, 240, 243, 318, 319, 333, 346 Armytage, W. H. G., 301 Aron, Laudan Y., 109 Arouet, François Marie, 247 Aurelius, Marcus, 469 Averroës, 243 Avicenna, 243 Axelrod, Saul, 371 Ayers, William, 137 Bachman, J. G., 93 Bagley, William, 292 Bahm, Archie J., 332 Banks, James A., 199 Banneker, Benjamin, 261 Barnard, Henry, 155, 253 Barnes, Donald, 301 Barr, Alfred, 292 Barr, Barbara, 456 Beane, James A., 109 Beard, Joseph, 293 Bedford, Clay P., 375 Beecher, Catharine, 291 Bell, George, 262 Benveniste, Luis, 419 Bergman, Justine, 271

Berliner, David C., 146 Berman, P., 184 Bestor, Arthur, 292 Bethune, Mary McLeod, 291 Beykont, Zeynep F., 73 Bial, Raymond, 268 Biddle, Bruce J., 146 Bierce, Ambrose, 312 Binet, Alfred, 283, 296 Bloom, Benjamin S., 292, 295–296, 436, 462 Bolman, Lee G., 184 Bonhoeffer, Dietrich, 88 Books, Sue, 75 Borton, Terry, 11 Bowles, Samuel, 378, 383 Bowser, Philip, 102 Bracey, Gerald W., 282 Bradley, Elizabeth, 245 Brameld, Theodore, 349, 378, 383 Bramlett, M. D., 108 Brazil, N., 445 Brewer, Dominic J., 141 Bright, Carl, 283 Brodinsky, Ben, 297 Brown, Sarah, 108 Brownell, George, 287 Bruner, Jerome, 283, 292, 295 Bruschi, Barbara A., 39 Buber, Martin, 351–352, 359 Buddha, 326 Buell, Nancy, 324 Buendia, Edward, 56 Burr, E., 184 Bursuck, William, 280 Bush, George H., 391 Bush, George W., 18, 157 Bush, Timothy, 414 Byngham, William, 285–286 Calhoun, Emily, 358, 462 Campbel, John, 287 Campbel, Robert, 287 Campbell, D. M., 382 Campbell, John Martin, 300

Canter, Lee, 372 Capella, Gladys, 300 Carlson, Richard, 383 Carter, Jimmy, 155 Carter, Robert T., 82 Carter, Steven, 306 Caulfield, Robert, 287 Cavalllo, David, 465–466 Cavanagh, John, 74 Chaplin, Duncan, 108 Charlemagne, 242 Charters, W. W., 292 Chase, Mary Ellen, 353 Chavis, John, 262 Chinn, Philip C., 73, 136 Chisolm, Shirley, 82 Cholo, Ana Beatriz, 235 Chomsky, Noam, 292 Cicero, Marcus, 240 Cigneeti, P. B., 382 Clark, Ron, 383 Clarke, Michele, 66 Cloud, John, 184 Cohen, Elizabeth G., 480 Coleman, James, 294 Coley, Richard J., 39 Collier, Virginia P., 74 Collins, Chuck, 74 Colton, Greg, 305 Comenius, Johann Amos, 246 Compayre, Gabriel, 268, 269 Comte, Auguste, 345 Conant, James, 283 Confucius, 123, 238, 327 Cordero, Rafael, 276–277 Costa, Jonathan, 446 Counts, George S., 292, 349 Cousins, Norman, 378 Crandall, Prudence, 262–263 Craven, Samuel M., 333 Crawford, Charlotte, 324 Creighton, Mandell, 348 Cremin, Lawrence A., 268 Cromer, Alan H., 332 Cronbach, Lee, 292

497 Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by A llyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

Crosland, Kristin, 56 Cross, W. E., Jr., 82 Cuomo, Andrew, 32 Curwin, Richard, 373 da Feltre, Vittorino, 243–244 Dandridge, William L., 184 d’Apollonia, Sylvia, 459 Darling-Hammond, Linda, 39, 419 Davi, Robert B., 359 David, Samuel, 269 Deal, Terrence E., 184 de Beauvoir, Simone, 114 Degler, Carl, 298 Delpit, Lisa, 136 Descartes, René, 247 DeWalt, Mark W., 273 Dewey, John, 259, 292, 321, 333, 337–338, 347, 350, 355, 359, 377, 383 Dianda, Marcella, 410 Dobson, James, 371 Dock, Christopher, 252 Doherty, Kathryn M., 419 Dolezal, Brian, 366 Doris, John M., 361 Douglass, Frederick, 262 Doumbia, Fode, 56 Dowdy, Carol A., 462 Driscoll, David P., 387 Duck, Lloyd, 359 DuFour, Rebecca, 483 DuFour, Echard, 483 Eaker, Robert, 483 Edds, Kimberly, 77 Edelman, Marion Wright, 52 Edmonds, Ron, 144 Egan, Marcus, 141 Egley, Arlen, 109 Egol, Morton, 273 Einstein, Albert, 396 Elson, William, 259 Emerson, George B., 255 Emery, Suzanne, 58 Ennis, Robert, 375 Erasmus, 244 Ericson, J., 184 Essex, Nathan L., 230 Estrin, Elise Trumbull, 122, 136

498

Name Index

Gagnon, Paul, 298 Gallup, Alec M., 7, 38, 109, 411, 419, 483 Gandhi, Mahatma, 467 Garber, Lee O., 231 Gardner, Howard, 409, 448, 449, 463 Gartner, Alan, 74 Geismar, Kathryn, 300 Genesee, Fred, 137 George, Archie A., 462 Gerald, Debra E., 13, 39 Gerdes, Janette, 341 Getzels, Jacob, 292 Gilbert, Susan, 361 Gill, Brian, 141 Gintis, Herbert, 378, 383 Giroux, Henry A., 349, 359, 375, 383 Gitlin, Andrew, 56 Gitomer, Drew H., 39 Glanigan, Christine M., 108 Glasser, William, 371, 383 Glickman, Carl D., 359, 370, 383 Goethe, 57 Gold, Christine, 294 Goldberg, Linn, 218 Goldhaber, D. D., 184 Goldman, Emma, 315 Gollnick, Donna M., 73, 136 Goodlad, John, 15, 374, 383 Goodwin, A. Lin, 418, 419 Gordon, Milton M., 74 Gordon, Thomas, 371 Grabe, Cindy, 462 Grabe, Mark, 462 Grant, Carl A., 136 Grant, Gerald, 74 Gray, Tracy, 465 Graziano, Clorinda, 173 Greene, Maxine, 133, 137, 323–326, 333, 376, 383 Greenspun, Philip, 455 Gregory, Dick, 89 Grubman, Barbara Joan, 116 Guilford, J. P., 292 Guthrie, W., 268 Hagen, Frank, 438 Hall, Gene E., 462, 468 Hall, Primus, 262

Hall, Samuel, 287–288 Hamilton, Edith, 178 Hannaway, Jane, 108 Hanson, E. Mark, 184 Harmin, Merrill, 371 Harris, D., 146 Harris, Thomas, 371 Hartman, Chris, 74 Havighurst, Robert, 292, 295 Haynie, Denise L., 109 Heath, Shirley Brice, 108 Hehir, Thomas, 73 Helms, J. E., 82 Henry, Tamara, 141 Herbart, Johann Friedrich, 249 Hillard, Asa, 122 Hobart, Nehemia, 256 Hodne, Peter, 368 Hoffer, Eric, 472 Holloway, John, 419 Holmes, Madelyn, 268 Holt, John, 296 Homme, Lloyd, 371 Honeyman, David S., 184 Hoover, Virginia, 34 Huerta, Luis, 184 Hunt, Jean Ann, 137 Hunter, Richard C., 184 Hussar, William J., 13, 39 Hutchins, Robert M., 340 Ignatus of Loyola, 246 Illich, Ivan, 296–297 Ingersoll, Jane, 290 James, William, 347 Jefferson, Thomas, 190, 261 Jencks, Christopher, 294 Jennings, Jack, 184 Jesus of Nazareth, 328 Johns, Roe L., 269 Johnson, David W., 368, 463 Johnson, Lyndon, 156, 201 Johnson, Roger T., 368, 463 Johnson, S. M., 374, 383 Johnston, L. D., 93 Jovanovic, Jasna, 127 Joyce, Bruce, 358, 462 Kamper, Patty, 366 Kamprath, N., 184 Kandel, Isaac L., 377, 383 Kant, Immanuel, 315, 317, 332 Kaplan, Bob, 34 Kaufman, Jonathan, 75 Kelley, M., 74 Kennedy, John F., 81, 163, 201 King, Martin Luther, Jr., 54 King, Sally Steinbach, 127 Kirp, David L., 231 Kirsch, Irwin, 136 Klein, M. Francis, 423 www.ablongman.com/johnson13e

Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by Allyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

Falk, Beverly, 419 Fassett, James, 259 Ferraro, Geraldine A., 36 Fine, Michelle, 82 Flanders, Ned, 293 Flesch, Rudolph, 292 Flores-Gonzales, Nilda, 107 Flygare, Thomas J., 231 Ford, A., 445 Ford, Henry, 479 Fox, James Alan, 108

Franklin, Benjamin, 254, 265, 287 Franklin, Nicholas, 262 Fraser, James W., 230 Fraser, Matthew, 222 Frederick the Great, 247 Freedman, Haskell C., 231 Freire, Paulo, 132, 350, 359 Friedenberg, Edgar, 296, 297 Froebel, Friedrich, 249 Fullan, Michael, 483 Fuller, Bruce, 184 Furstenberg, Frank F., Jr., 108

Klein, Susan, 74 Kneller, George F., 308, 332 Knight, Lucy, 231 Koball, Heather, 108 Kohlberg, Lawrence, 313 Kohn, Afie, 358, 418, 483 Kor, Ah-Lian, 316 Kosciw, Joseph G., 109 Kozol, Jonathan, 80, 107, 108, 296, 297, 413 Krathwohl, David R., 437, 462 K’ung-Fu-Tzu (Confucius), 123, 238, 327 Kurtz, Michele, 387

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

Labaree, David F., 109 LaBoskey, Vicki Kubler, 27 Ladson-Billings, Gloria, 74, 383 LaMorte, Michael, 231 Langdon, Carol A., 8, 38, 39 Lao-tszu, 238 Larerson, Marvin, 284 Latham, Andrew S., 39 Lazarus, Emma, 263 Leavitt, Paul, 39 Lebowitz, Holly J., 74, 75 Lee, Robert E., 395 Lessow-Hurley, Judith, 444 Leu, Deborah Diadiun, 462 Leu, Donald J., 462 Levin, Betsy, 231 Levin, Henry, 447 Levine, Daniel U., 185 Lewis, Amanda E., 83 Lincoln, Abraham, 263 Lindsay, Samuel M., 7 Lipsky, Dorothy Kerzner, 74 Little Soldier, Lee, 329 Littleton, Scott C., 332 Liu, Jing-Qui, 101 Liverpool, Moses, 262 Locke, John, 246, 319, 333, 343 Lotan, Rachel, 480 Lou, Yiping, 459 Luke, Bettie Sing, 116 Lund, Darren E., 137 Luther, Martin, 244 Lycurgus, 239 Lyon, Mary, 290 McCarthy, Joseph, 395–396 McCullough, David, 298 McCutcheon, Gail, 308 McGuffey, William Holmes, 258 MacKenzie, Robert J., 383 McKeon, Denise, 410 McLaren, Ann, 410 McLaughlin, Milbrey W., 108 McLellan, Jeffery A., 300 McLuhan, Marshall, 292 Maher, Carolyn A., 359 Males, Mike A., 108

Malone, Gwendolyn, 102 Mann, Horace, 252–253, 288 Manzo, Kathleen Kennedy, 421 Mao Tse-tung, 258 Mark, Elias, 290 Mark, Julia, 290 Marshall, Thurgood, 169 Martin, Jane Roland, 315, 317–318, 333, 383 Masia, Bertram B., 462 Maslow, Abraham, 292 Mastrosimone, William, 77 Mead, Margaret, 130 Mears, Daniel P., 109 Meiklejohn, J. M. D., 332 Melanchthon, 244 Melenyzer, B. J., 382 Mendler, Allen, 373 Mengelkoch, Louise, 332 Millet, Kate, 60 Miner, Myrtilla, 262 Mohammed, 243, 328 Mondimore, Francis Mark, 74 Monroe, Paul, 268, 269 Montessori, Maria, 105, 290 Moran, Rachel F., 231 Morgan, Harry, 268 Morphet, Edgar L., 269 Morris, Van Cleve, 337 Morse, Jodie, 184 Morse-McNeely, Pat, 294, 366 Mosher, W. D., 108 Nansel, Tonja R., 109 Neau, Elias, 262 Neff, Mary, 173 Negroni, Italia, 446 Neill, A. S., 352, 358, 359 Nelson, B., 184 Nelson-Barber, Sharon, 122, 136 Nerburn, Kent, 332 Netterville, Claude, 28 Nettles, D. H., 382 Nicoleau, Guitele, 300 Nietzsche, Friedrich, 323, 333, 369 Nixon, Richard M., 201 Noddings, Nel, 8, 312, 332, 352, 355, 359 Oland, Dave, 366 Olson, Lynn, 419 O’Malley, P. M., 93 Orfield, Gary, 74, 75 Oshiymam, Libby, 483 Osman, Howard A., 333 Overpeck, Mary D., 109 Pai, Young, 337 Palmer, Barbara Smith, 473 Palmer, Parker J., 332, 483 Parkay, F., 426 Patton, James R., 462

Peirce, Charles Sanders, 320–321, 333, 347, 376, 383 Perrone, Vito, 374, 383 Perry, R., 184 Pestalozzi, Johann Heinrich, 248–249, 259 Piaget, Jean, 292, 295, 296 Pickering, Marvin L., 213 Plank, D., 146 Plato, 239, 240, 315–317, 318, 332 Plutarch, 239 Polakow, Valerie, 108 Pollalschele, James, 438 Polloway, Edward, 462 Popham, W. James, 418 Pormont, Philemon, 251 Powell, Lewis F., Jr., 169 Powell, Linda C., 82 Powell, Majorie, 293 Puryear, S., 184 Putnam, Robert, 361 Pythagoras, 239 Quinn, Therese, 137 Quintilian, 241, 268, 294 Raines, Peggy, 358 Randolph, A. Philip, 113 Raths, Louis, 371 Ravitch, Diane, 213, 292, 300, 374, 383 Raywid, Mary Anne, 483 Reed, Bobette, 184 Reeve, Christopher, 64 Reeves, Douglas B., 184 Richardson, Noel, 204 Rickover, Hyman, 292 Rolfe, John, 260 Roosevelt, Franklin D., 201, 291, 344 Rorty, Richard, 321–322, 333 Rose, Lowell C., 7, 38, 109, 411, 419, 483 Rose, Stephen J., 74, 136 Rosenshine, Barak, 463 Rosenthall, Alan, 294 Rousseau, Jean Jacques, 236, 248, 350–351, 359 Ruan, June, 109 Rugg, Harold, 349 Ruskin, John, 292 Russ, Cynthia, 473 Ryans, D. G., 292 Sacks, Peter, 418 Sadker, David, 74 Sadker, Myra, 74 Sage, Sara, 358 Sanchez, George, 277 Sartre, Jean-Paul, 323, 333 Saxon, Tracy Jones, 204 Scapp, Ron, 483 Name Index

499

Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by A llyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

Scarloss, Beth, 480 Scheidt, Peter C., 109 Schmuck, P. A., 383 Schmuck, R., 383 Schoenbeit, Marian Beauchamp, 379, 383 Schurz, Carl, 315 Schwarz, Christina V., 463 Scopes, John, 196 Seitz, Reynolds C., 231 Self, John, 316 Serim, Ferdi, 456 Seybold, Robert F., 256 Shadiav, Linda, 358 Shaw, George Bernard, 475 Sheive, Linda Tinelli, 379, 383 Sheppard, Mathew, 77 Shultz, Susan E., 480 Silberman, Charles, 296–297 Silverman, D., 184 Silverstein, Shel, 348 Simon, Sydney, 313, 371 Simpson, E. J., 438, 462 Sizer, Nancy Faust, 472, 483 Sizer, Theodore R., 343–344, 447, 463, 472, 483 Skinner, B. F., 296, 344 Skinner, Ronald A., 419 Slavin, Robert E., 371, 447, 463 Sleeter, Christine E., 136 Smith, Brian, 465 Smith, Glenn, 268 Smith, Ronald G., 359 Smith, Tom E., 462 Socrates, 239–240, 315–316 Solomon, D., 184 Solon, 239 Soltis, Jonas F., 358 Sonenstein, Freya L., 108 Spielberg, Steven, 355 Spring, Joel, 300 Stanford, B., 426 Stark, Steven, 184 Stevahn, Laurie, 368 Stevens, R., 463

Stewart, Potter, 169 Stoddard, George, 292 Strike, Kenneth A., 358 Sum, Andrew, 136 Sylvester, Elisha, 262 Symcox, Linda, 418, 419 Szasz, Margaret Connell, 268 Taggert, Robert, 136 Tait, Ken, 316 Tatum, Beverly Daniel, 82 Tebo, Margaret Graham, 221 Terman, Lewis, 283, 292 Thomas, Samuel, 261 Thomas, W. P., 74 Thoreau, Henry David, 339 Timpane, Michael, 141 Toffler, Alvin, 470, 483 Toledo, Eileen, 245 Torp, Linda, 358 Torrence, E. Paul, 292 Tower, David, 259 Trotter, Andrew, 465 Trump, J. Lloyd, 292 Turiel, Elliot, 361 Turk, Jane, 208 Twain, Mark, 157

Weiss, Monica, 446 Weldon, James E. C., 333 West, Cornel, 311, 313–314, 332 Wexler, E., 184 White, Byron, 225 White, Ryan, 203 Whitehead, Alfred North, 316, 319–320, 333 Wiggins, Grant, 404, 405 Willard, Emma, 289–290, 301 Williams, Nathaniel, 256 Williams, Paul, 220 Wilson, Terry P., 333 Wineburg, Sam, 298 Witherell, William, 251 Witherspoon, John, 262 Witte, John F., 483 Wittrock, M. C., 463 Wolf, Richard, 39 Wolfgang, Charles H., 359, 370, 383 Wolk, Ronald A., 335 Wong, Kenneth K., 184 Wong, L. Mun, 82 Wood, Craig R., 184 Wright, Orville, 395 Wright, Wilbur, 395 Wyman, R. M., Jr., 382

Uchiama, Kay, 462 Xenophon, 239 Valente, William D., 231 Veronesi, Peter D., 403 Vesper, Nick, 8, 38, 39 Voltaire, 247 Voltz, D., 445 Ward, Douglas, 58 Ward, William Arthur, 373 Warren, Earl, 201 Washington, Booker T., 263 Washington, George, 261 Webster, Noah, 258, 259 Weil, Marsha, 358, 462 Weis, Lois, 82 Weiss, Beverly J., 268

Yava, Albert, 329 Yavny, Galena, 43 Yavny, Leonard, 43 Yeskel, Felice, 74 Young, Ella Flagg, 290–291 Youniss, James, 300 Yudof, Mark G., 231 Zawitz, Marianne, 108 Zehr, Mary Ann, 43 Zend, Robert, 309 Ziomek, Robert, 39 Zirkel, Perry A., 231 Zuckerman, Mortimer B., 255

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

500

Name Index

www.ablongman.com/johnson13e

Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by Allyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

Subject Index

Ability grouping, 353, 440 Ableism, 83 Abstraction, 309–310 Abuse, 88 legal protection against, 224–225 Academic achievement increasing through essential schools, 354 as purpose of schools, 100 Academic freedom, 212–215 book banning and censorship and, 213–214 Buckley Amendment and, 214–215 for elementary and secondary teachers, 212–213 Academies for teacher training, 287 Accelerated schools, 447 Accommodations for exceptional learners, 443–444 Accountability, 177–179, 409–416 equity within, 413–416 focused on student learning, increase in, 470–471 of teachers, 178 testing ups and downs and, 409–413 Accreditation of schools and education programs, 18–29 Acculturation, 48 Achievement, academic increasing through essential schools, 354 as purpose of schools, 100 Achievement gap, 157 Actions in tort, 215 Active learning time (ALT), 438 Adaptation, 376 change as, 378 Adequate yearly progress under No Child Left Behind Act, 157 Adult education, 282 Advanced certification, 22 Advertising as revenue source, 172 Affective domain, learning objectives for, 436–438 Affirmative action, 201, 202 African Americans underserving of, 260–263 women in education of, 291 AFT (American Federation of Teachers), 477 Age of Pericles, 239 Age of Reason, 247 Agostini v. Felton, 193 Aguilar v. Felton, 193 AIDS as disability, 203 Aims, 434 ALT (active learning time), 438 American Academy, 241

American Federation of Teachers (AFT), 477 Analysis of teaching, 293 Analytic rubrics, 402, 404 Analytic thinking, 309–310 Anecdotal records for performance assessment, 402 Apprenticeships for teachers, 287 Asian American students, growing number of, 275–276 Assertive discipline, 372–373 Assessments, 365–367, 396–409 alternative, 403 authentic, 15 capstone/summative, 400 competency-based, 399 criterion-referenced, 400 definition of, 397 evolution of, 282–283 good, professional aspects of, 407–409 norm-referenced, 399–400 performance. See Performance assessment purposes for, 397–398 reliability of, 409 teacher burden related to, 413 traditional, 399–400 validity of, 408–409 Assimilation, 48–49 Assistant principals, roles and responsibilities of, 145 Athletes, drug testing of, 218 Attestations, 26 Audiotapes for performance assessment, 402 Audio technology, 454 Authentic assessments, 15. See also Performance assessment Authentic learning environment, creating, 469 Axiology, 308–309 Banning of books, 213–214 Behavioral objectives, 435 Behavioral theories, 296 Behaviorism, 344–345 Benchmarks, 393 Bethel School District No. 403 v. Fraser, 219, 222–223 Bilingual education, 128, 442 Bilingualism, 58–59 Bloom’s Taxonomy, 436 Blue-Backed Speller, 258 Board of Education, Island Trees Union Free District No. 26 v. Pico, 219 Board of Education of Kiryas Joel Village School District v. Grumet, 193

501 Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by A llyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

Board of Education of Oklahoma City Public Schools v. Dowell, 199 Board of Education of the Westside Community Schools v. Mergens, 195 Board of Regents of State Colleges v. Roth, 206 Board of Regents v. Roth, 208, 210 Boards of education. See School boards Books banning and censorship of, 213–214 Blue-Backed Speller, 258 Great Books program and, 340 hornbooks, 257 McGuffey Readers, 258, 259–260 New England Primer, 257–258 selection by school districts, 430–431 textbooks, 423–424, 430–431 Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 198, 199 Buckley Amendment, 214 Bullying among youth, 95–96 Burkey v. Marshall County Board of Education, 206 Busing, growth of, 274

502

Subject Index

www.ablongman.com/johnson13e

Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by Allyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

Capstone assessments, 400 Career development for teaching profession, 474–475 Censorship, 213–214 Central office staff, roles and responsibilities of, 149–150 Certification, 206–207 advanced, 22 state, 20 state office listing for, 484–485 Chain of command, 150 Change as adaptation, 377 characteristics of, 467–468 as dialectic, 378 as rational process, 377–378 as reconstruction, 378 size of, 468–470 Change agents, 376 teachers as, 377–378 Character development, emphasis on, 471–472 Charter schools, 160 Cheating on high-stakes tests, 324–325, 410–411 Chemical dependency, 93 Child abuse, 88 legal protection against, 224–225 Child benefit theory, 193 Chinese education, 238–239 Chinese thought, 327 Choice theory of discipline, 371–372 Church(es). See also Parochial schools; Religion education of African Americans by, 261 Church and state, 190–197 excessive entanglement and, 191–194 religious activities in public schools and, 194–197 religious education and, 191, 192 transportation for church school students and, 191 Cities, 70–71 Citizenship as purpose of schools, 99 Civic values, 368 Classroom analysis systems, 24 Classroom(s) as dynamic centers of learning, 480–481 Classroom climate, 374–376 space and, 376 voice and, 375–376

Classroom implementation studies of curriculum, 432 Classroom management for exceptional learners, 445 Classroom organization, 364–367 lesson planning and, 365 physical setting and, 365 student assessment and evaluation and, 365–367 Class size impact of, 146 international comparison of, 180–181 Class structure, 51–52 Cleveland Board of Education v. LeFleur, 206 Cocurriculum, 425 Codes of ethics, 23, 486–487 Cognitive development, 296 Cognitive objectives, 435–436 Collective bargaining, 211 Colleges African American, 263 early, 251–252 state teachers’ colleges, 288, 289 Colonial America education in, 250–252 teacher preparation in, 286 Committee of Ten, 283–284 Common elementary schools, 252–253 Competency-based assessments, 399 Competition among schools, increased, 472 Compulsory education, 252 Computer labs, 456–457 Conclusions, testing, 26 Conflict resolution, 368 discipline and, 373 Connection in thinking, 312 Constructivism, 352–355 Content standards, 391, 393–394 Continuing education, 282 Control theory of discipline, 371–372 Cooperation, 368 Cooperative learning, 440 Corporal punishment, 223–224 Course syllabi, 424 Court cases on church and state, 191–194 on equal educational opportunity, 171 on parents’ rights to educate their children, 273–274 on segregation, 198, 199–200 on students’ rights and responsibilities, 219–226 on taxation and education, 169, 170–171 on teachers’ rights and responsibilities, 206, 208, 210, 212–216 Creationism, 196–197 Criterion-referenced assessments, 400 Critical pedagogy, 349 Critical thinking by teachers, 131 Cultural choice, 50–51 Culturally relevant teaching, 120–124 building on cultural context and, 121–122 centering on cultures of students and, 122 validating student voices and, 123–124 Cultural transmission as purpose of schools, 101 Culture, 44, 45–47. See also Diversity; Multicultural education acculturation and, 48 assimilation and, 48–49 characteristics of, 45–46

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

cultural choice and, 50–51 dominant (mainstream), 46 exceptionalities and, 65 microcultural groups and, 45, 46–47 pluralism and, 49–50 of school, 119–120 Curricula, 423–433 constructivist, 353–355 designs for, 427–428, 429 essentialist, 343 evaluating, 431–432 growth of, 275 hidden, 99, 120 humanistic, 351 integrating technology with, 458–460 managing, 428, 430–431 perennialist, 339=340 reconstructionist, 349 resources for, 423–425 selecting, 425–428 Curriculum guides, 424 Curriculum specialists, 431 Dame schools, 251 Dark Ages, education in, 242 De facto segregation, 197 De jure segregation, 197 Demand for teachers, 11, 12–15 Democracy, 96–105 cultural diversity and, 101, 104–105 progressivism and, 348–349 purposes of schools and, 98–101 schools’ roles and, 97–98 Department heads, roles and responsibilities of, 145 Desegregation, 197. See also Segregation and desegregation Development of teaching profession, 278–291 changing aims of education and, 283–285 education of women and, 289–291 increasing complexity of educational enterprise and, 278–283 teacher preparation and, 285–289 Dialectic, change as, 378 Dialectical diversity, 60 Digital divide, 124–126 Dignity, discipline with, 373 Direct instruction, 438, 439 positivism and, 346 Disabilities, 64. See also Exceptionalities; Exceptional learners AIDS as, 203 Disaggregation of test scores, 157 Discernment, 311–312 Discipline, 370–374 assertive, 372–373 conflict resolution and, 373 control (choice) theory of, 371–372 with dignity, 373 peer mediation and, 373–374 rules for, 374 teachers’ philosophy of, 294–295 uniforms and, 366–367 Discipline-based standards, 391, 393–394 Discretionary duties and responsibilities, 149 Discrimination, 48, 80–83, 201

affirmative action and, 201, 202 disabilities and, 83 gender-based, 82–83 in hiring of teachers, 211 institutional, 81 racial, 81–82 reverse, 202 Dispositions, 16, 393 with exceptional learners, 443–444, 445 Disproportionate placements of exceptional learners, 67 Distance learning, 454 Diversity, 43–72. See also Culture dialectical, 60 ethnicity and, 51, 54, 55–57 exceptionalities and, 64–67 gender and, 60–63 geographic, 69–71 increasing, 275–278 language and, 57–60 multicultural education and. See Multicultural education race and, 54–55 religious, 67–69 socioeconomic status and. See Socioeconomic status among teachers, 15 underserving of diverse populations and, 260–263 Domestic violence, 88 Dominant culture, 46 Dress codes, 223 Dropping out, 92–93 Drug testing of athletes, 218 Drug use, 93–94 Due process, 204 students’ right to, 220–223 EAHCA (Education for All Handicapped Children Act), 203, 226 Eastern ways of knowing, 326–328 educational implications of, 326–328 Ebonics, 60 Education, right to, 219 Educational Amendments Act, Title IX of, 224 Educational critics, 296–297 Educational malpractice, 215 Educational philosophy, 361–381 classroom climate and, 374–376 classroom organization and, 364–367 discipline and, 370–374 learning focus and, 376–377 motivation and, 367–369 teachers as change agents and, 377–378 teachers as leaders and, 378–380 Educational system, 141–182. See also School(s) evolution of. See Evolution of education federal government’s role in, 153–158 financing and. See Financing; Taxes foundations and, 159 intermediate units and, 158–159 local control of, 166 politics and, 162–165 school choice and, 159–162, 166–167 state-level organization of, 150–153 structure of, 142–167 Subject Index

503

Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by A llyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

504

Subject Index

Equity, 112 within accountability, 413–416 modeling in classroom, 131–132 ESL (English as a second language), 129 Essentialism, 340, 342–344 Essential schools, 343–344, 354 Ethical codes, 23, 486–487 Ethnic groups, 51. See also specific groups Ethnicity, 51, 54, 55–57 ethnic diversity and, 55–57 panethnic membership and, 54 Ethnocentrism, 80 Evaluation, 365–367 Everson v. Board of Education, 191 Evolution, creationism versus, 196–197 Evolution of education, 236–249 beginnings of education and, 237–241 in colonial America, 250–252 for diverse populations, 260–263 federal involvement in education and, 255–256 important dates in, 490–493 major events in past century and, 297–298 in Middle Ages, 241–243 in modern period, 247–249 of private education, 263–266 in Renaissance and Reformation, 243–244, 246 Roman education and, 240–241 secondary schools and, 254–255 teaching materials and, 257–260 universal elementary education and, 252–254 Exceptionalities, 64–67 ableism and, 83 cultural differences and, 65 disproportionate placements and, 67 inclusion and, 65–67 Exceptional learners exemption from graduation tests, 414–415 homework and, 280 opportunities for, 202–203 rights of, 226 teaching strategies for, 442–445 Excessive entanglement, 191–194 Existentialism, 322–326 educational implications of, 322–323 Expulsion, procedural due process and, 220–222 Extra-curriculum, 425 Fairness of assessments, 408 Families, 84–88 abuse in, 88 homelessness and, 86–88 latchkey kids and, 85–86 parenting and, 84–85 Family Rights and Privacy Act, 214 Federal government, 153–158. See also Court cases; Legislation aid from, 177, 279 educational programs operated by, 155–156 evolution of education and, 255–256 increasing involvement in education, 278–279 leadership provided by, 153–154 No Child Left Behind legislation and, 18, 156–158 Financing, 167–181, 252–253 accountability and, 177–179 advertising as source of, 172 www.ablongman.com/johnson13e

Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by Allyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

Educational testing. See Tests and testing Educational theories, 335–357 behaviorist, 344–345 constructivist, 352–355 essentialist, 340, 342–344 humanist, 350–352 perennialist, 338–340 positivist, 345–347 progressivist, 347–349 reconstructionist, 349–350 teacher-centered versus student-centered authority classroom approaches and, 363 “Education for All American Youth,” 284 Education for All Handicapped Children Act (EAHCA), 203, 226 Education International, 479 Education profession, 1, 15–28, 472–479 analysis of practice and reflection and, 25–26 career development curriculum for, 474–475 code of ethics and, 23, 486–487 development of. See Development of teaching profession folio/portfolio development and, 26–28 “No Child Left Behind” legislation and, 18 participation in, 475–479 practice of, 23–28 professional associations and, 478–479, 494–495 professional collaboration and, 475 professional knowledge for, 15–16 professional responsibilities and, 22–23 quality assurance and, 18–22 standards for, 17–18 systematic observation and journaling and, 24–25 Education spending, 176–177 federal aid and, 177 state aid and, 175–177 Edwards v. Aguilard, 195 Effective teaching movement, 293 Egyptian education, 239 Eight-Year Study, 284 Elementary education generalizations about, 253 universal, struggle for, 252–254 ELLs (English language learners), 427 resources for, 442–443, 444 teaching strategies for, 442 E-mail, 453 integrating with curriculum and instruction, 459 Emergence of Common Man, 248 Employment contracts, 207 Empowerment by teachers, 379–380 Enabling laws, 189 Enculturation, 45 English as a second language (ESL), 129 English language learners (ELLs), 427 resources for, 442–443, 444 teaching strategies for, 442 Enrollments, increasing, 179, 272–273 Entrepreneurial funding, 172 Epistemology, 308 Equal educational opportunity, 118, 201–203 increasing struggle for, 279 states’ responsibility to guarantee, 171 Equality, 115–119

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

categorical federal aid and, 279 condition of schools and, 180 education spending and, 175–177 entrepreneurial, 172 federal sources of, 177, 279 fund raising for, 172–175 growth of school budgets, 274 increasing enrollments and, 179 National Science Foundation and, 279 state sources of, 169–170 student fees for, 172 taxes and. See Taxes taxpayer revolt and, 179 First Amendment, 190 Folios student, 401 of teachers, 26–28 Foundation(s), funding from, 159 Foundation programs, 176–177 Fourteenth Amendment, 190 Franklin v. Guinneth County Schools, 224 Freeman v. Pitts, 199 Free speech, 222–223 Fringe benefits, 31–32 Fund-raising efforts, 172–175 Futurism, 470 Gambling as revenue source, 170 Gays, 63 Gender differences between sexes and, 60–61 sexism and, 82–83 sexuality and, 90–92 sexual orientation and, 63 Title IX and, 62–63 Gender-sensitive education, 126–128 Generalists, 431 Generalization, 310–311 Geographic diversity, 69–71 GI Bill, 278–279 Global perspective on assessment, 412–413 on class size, 180–181 on Eastern ways of knowing, 328 on educational ideas borrowed from around the world, 237 on educational theories, 356 in educational transplantation from Europe, 253–254 on education in other countries, 228 on Education International, 479 on European beginnings of teacher preparation, 285–286 on German education, 441 on Jean Piaget, 296 on maria Montessori, 290 on salaries, 30, 31 on social justice, 133–134 on universal values, 104–105 on women’s political participation, 62 on world as classroom, 380 Goals, 434 Goss v. Lopez, 219, 221 Governance of independent schools, 162 Grading by students, of one another’s papers, 214–215 Grand Rapids v. Ball, 193

Great Books program, 340 Greek education, 239–240 Griffin v. County School Board of Prince Edward County, 199 Grooming, 223 Grouping, ability, 353, 440 Groups, learning in, 480 Harassment among youth, 95 Harvard, 251–252 Hatch Act, 256 Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, 219, 225 Hebrew education, 238 Helena Elementary School District v. State, 171 Heterogeneous grouping, 353, 440 Hidden curriculum, 99 in school culture, 120 Highly qualified teachers, 416 under No Child Left Behind Act, 157 High schools. See Secondary schools High-stakes tests, 410–411 cheating on, 324–325, 410–411 preparing for, 324, 412 Hindu education, 238 Hispanic American students, growing number of, 276–278 Historical interpretation, 236 History critiquing historical sources and, 256 of education. See Evolution of education keeping up with research and, 264 knowledge of, multicultural education and, 277 learning from, 266 value of, 298 Holistic rubrics, 402, 404, 405 Homelessness, 86–88 right to education and, 219–220 Home schooling, 162, 281–282 Homework, students with disabilities and, 280 Homogeneous grouping, 353, 440 Honig v. Doe, 219, 226 Hope, 313–314 Hopi thought, 329–330 Hornbooks, 257 Hortonville Joint School District No. 1 v. Hortonville Education Association, 206, 212 Humanism, 243, 350–352 Hypocrisy, tracking, 312–313, 314 Hypotheses, forming, 25–26 IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act), 203 Idealism, 315–318 educational implications of, 315 IFL (Institute for Learning), 447 Imagination, 310–311 Immersion programs for exceptional learners, 442 “Imperative Needs of Youth,” 285 Incentive programs, 175 Inclusion, exceptionalities and, 65–67 Income taxes, 170 Indentured servants, teachers as, 286, 287 Independent schools, 162 Indian thought, 326–327 Indirect instruction, 439–440 Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), 203 Subject Index

505

Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by A llyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

Induction programs, 11 Inflation, salaries and, 31 Information age, 5 Information technology in multicultural classrooms, 124–126 Ingraham v. Wright, 219, 223 Inquiry lessons, 439 Institute for Learning (IFL), 447 Institutional discrimination, 81 Instruction direct, 438, 439 indirect, 439–440 integrating technology with, 458–460 model-centered, 440 Instructional objectives, 433–438 affective, 436–438 aims, goals, and objectives and, 434 behavioral, 435 cognitive, 435–436 psychomotor, 438 INTASC (Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium), 20–21 Integrating technology, 450–451, 452 Integration, 197 present status of, 200–201 Interactive whiteboards, 455–457 Interest groups, curriculum selection and, 426 Intermediate units, 158–159 International curriculum studies, 433 Internet, 453 integrating with curriculum and instruction, 458–459 Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC), 20–21 Interviews for performance assessment, 402 structured, 24–25 Japanese thought, 327 Jesuits, 246 Job market, relevance of education to, 341–342 Job websites, 488–489 Journal(s), learning, 401 Journaling, 24, 25 Judicial interpretive process, 189 Junior high schools, 244 Justice, social, 114–115, 132–134 Knowledge base of teachers, 9, 15–16

506

Subject Index

McGuffey Readers, 258, 259–260 Magnet schools, 159–160 Mainstream culture, 46 www.ablongman.com/johnson13e

Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by Allyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

Lakota thought, 329 Lamb’s Chapel v. Center Moriches Union Free School District, 195 Language, 57–60. See also English language learners (ELLs) communicating with parents of English language learners and, 130 dialectical diversity and, 60 diversity of, 57–59 education for language diversity and, 128–130 English as a second language and, 129 Latchkey kids, 85–86 Latin grammar schools, 241, 254 Law suits. See also Court cases students’ right to bring, 220 Leadership of federal government, 153–155

importance of, 149 teachers as leaders and, 378–380 Learners. See Student(s); Youth of today Learning classrooms as dynamic centers of, 480–481 cooperative, 440 in groups, 480 increased accountability focused on, 470–471 problem-based, 355, 439–440 reflective, Socratic dialogue to enhance, 316 revival of, 242–243 Learning focus, 376–377 behaviorist, 344–345 essentialist, 342–343 perennialist, 339 positivist, 346 Learning logs/journals, 401 Learning process, study of, 294–296 Lee v. Weisman, 195 Legal issues, 187–229. See also Court cases; Legislation; U.S. Constitution church and state. See Church and state equal opportunity. See Equal educational opportunity in other countries, 228 segregation and desegregation. See Segregation and desegregation students’ rights and responsibilities. See Students’ rights and responsibilities teachers’ rights and responsibilities. See Teachers’ rights and responsibilities Legislation on compulsory education, 252 early school laws, 251 enabling, 189 on equal educational opportunity, 202–203, 226 on financing, 256 judicial interpretive process and, 189 No Child Left Behind law, 18, 156–158, 279, 391 on right to education, 219–220 on sex discrimination, 224 on veterans’ education, 278–279 on vocational education, 255–256 Lemon v. Kurtzman, 191–194 Lesbians, 63 Lesson planning, 365 Liability governmental immunity from, 215 of teachers, 215–217 Liability insurance, 216–217 Licensure, 20–21, 206–207 alternative, 33–34 performance-based systems for, 20 renewal of licenses and, 37 state office listing for, 484–485 tests for, 33 Line relationships, 143 Local control of schools, 166 Local teacher organizations, 477–478 Locker searches, 226–227 Logic, 311 Logs, learning, 401

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

Mandatory duties and responsibilities, 149 Marriage of students, 224 Mentoring among teachers, 11 Meritocracy, 115 Metaphysics, 307–308 Microcultural groups, 45, 46–47 Middle Ages, education in, 241–243 Middle Eastern thought, 327–328 Middle schools, 244 Mobile digital devices, 453 Model-centered instruction, 440 Modeling by teachers, 379 Monitorial schools, 252 Morals, teaching of, 313 Morrill Land Grant Act, 255–256 Motivation, 367–369 uniforms and, 366–367 Mozert v. Hawklins County Public Schools, 195 Multicultural education, 111–134, 114 culturally relevant teaching and. See Culturally relevant teaching diversity and, 114 equality and, 115–119 gender-sensitive, 126–128 information technology and, 124–126 knowledge of history to improve, 277 language diversity and, 128–130 school culture and, 119–120 social justice and, 114–115 teachers as social activists and, 130–134 Multimedia, 454 Multimedia presentations, integrating with curriculum and instruction, 460 Multiple intelligences, school reform and, 448–449 National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS), 22 National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), 19–20 National curriculum studies, 432 National Education Association (NEA), 476–477 National exam, 411–412 National Science Foundation, 279 Native North American ways of knowing, 328–330 educational implications of, 330 Naturalism, 248 Navajo thought, 329 NBPTS (National Board for Professional Teaching Standards), 22 NCATE (National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education), 19–20 NCLB. See No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law NEA (National Education Association), 476–477 Neglect, legal protection against, 224–225 Negligence, 215 New England Primer, 257–258 New Jersey v. T.L.O., 219 Nineteenth Amendment, 291 No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law, 18, 156–158, 279 standards and, 391 Normal schools, 287–288 Norm-referenced assessments, 399–400 North Haven Board of Education v. Bell, 206 Northwest Ordinance, 255 Note-taking, informal, 24

Objectives, 434. See also Instructional objectives Observation for performance assessment, 402 systematic, 24–25 Old Deluder Satan Act, 251 One-room schools, 273–274 Open adoption, 430 Opportunity-to-learn standards, 118, 395 Organization chart, 147 Owasso Independent School District v. Falvo, 215 Panethnic membership, 54 Parenting, 84–85 Parents. See also Families of English language learners, communicating with, 130 Parochial schools, 161–162, 264, 265 Title I teachers in, 193–194 transportation for students of, 191 PCs (personal computers), 451–453 PDK (Phi Delta Kappa International), 478 Peer mediation, discipline and, 373–374 Performance assessment, 400–407 designing, 404–407 interviews for, 402 rubrics and, 402, 404, 405 types of, 401 Performance assessments, 17 Performance-based licensing, 20 Performance standards, 394–395 Perrenialism, 338–340 Perry v. Sindermann, 206, 210 Personal computers (PCs), 451–453 Phi Delta Kappa International (PDK), 478 Philosophy, 303–330. See also Educational theories branches of, 307–309 Eastern, 326–328 educational. See Educational philosophy educational implications of, 336–337 existential, 322–326 idealist, 315–318 native North American, 328–330 pragmatist, 320–322 realist, 318–320 religion and, 314 teachers as change agents and, 377–378 teachers as leaders and, 378–380 ways of thinking in, 309–314 Photo technology, 454 Physical environment of classroom, 365 Pickering v. Board of Education, 206, 213 Plessy v. Ferguson, 198, 199 Pluralism, 49–50 religious, 67–68 Plyler v. Doe, 219 Police Department of the City of Chicago v,. Mosley, 195 Policy-to-practice continuum, 143 Political action committees, 478 Politics in education, 162–165 school-based, 164 school boards and, 164 at school district level, 163 superintendent and, 164 teachers and, 165 volatility of election politics and, 163 Subject Index

507

Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by A llyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

Portfolios development of, 28 preparing, 27–28 student, 401 of teachers, 20–21, 26–28 Positivism, 345–347 Poverty, 52–54 Power in society, 79–83 Pragmatism, 320–322 educational implications of, 320 Praxis Series, 21 Prayer in school, 194–196 Pregnancy of students, 224 Prejudice, 81 Principals accountability of, 178 roles and responsibilities of, 144–145 Private schools, 161–162 continued importance of, 281 importance in America, 265–266 parochial. See Parochial schools right to exist, 263–265 Probationary period, 207–208 Problem-based learning, 439–440 constructionism and, 355 Procedural due process, 204 suspension and expulsion and, 220–222 Profession(s). See also Education profession characteristics of, 15–18 Professional associations, 478–479 list of, 494–495 Professional knowledge of teachers, 15–16 Professional learning communities, 479 Proficiencies, 389 Progressive taxes, 168 Progressivism, 347–349 Property taxes, 168–169 Prophetic thinking, 309, 311–314 Psychomotor domain, learning objectives for, 438 Public Law 94-142, 203 Public opinion on schools, 297 Punishment, corporal, 223–224 “Purposes of Education in American democracy,” 284

508

Subject Index

Salaries, 29–32 differences among, 30, 31 fringe benefits and, 31–32 inflation and, 31 recruitment incentives and, 32 Salary schedules, 30 Sales taxes, 170 San Antonio (Texas) Independent School District v. Rodriguez, 169 Santa Fe Independent School District, Petitioner v. Jane Doe, 194–195 SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test), 283 SBDM (site-based decision making), 144 Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), 283 Scholasticism, 243 School(s) accelerated, 447 American Academy, 241 as center for delivery of coordinated service, 471 charter, 160 common elementary schools, 252 condition of, 180 culture of, 119–120 dame, 251 democratic, 105 high schools, 244 immigrant students in, 56 increased competition among, 472 independent, 162 influence on curriculum, 427 junior high schools, 244 Latin grammar schools, 241, 254 magnet, 159–160 middle schools, 244 monitorial, 252 need for, 273 normal, 287–288 one-room, 273–274 organization of, 143–150 parochial, 161–162, 264, 265 www.ablongman.com/johnson13e

Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by Allyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

Race, 54–55. See also specific groups in suburban school, 83 Racial identity, development of, 82 Racism, 81–82 Rationalists, 247 Realism, 318–320 educational implications of, 318–319 Real-world standards, 390 Reconstruction, change as, 378 Reconstructionism, 349–350 as role of school, 98 Recruitment incentives, 32, 34–35 Reflective journaling, 25 Reflective learning, Socratic dialogue to enhance, 316 Reformation, education during, 244, 246 Regressive taxes, 168–169 Rehabilitation Act, Section 504 of, 202–203, 226 Reinforcement, 345 Reliability of assessments, 409 Religion, 67–69 philosophy and, 314

pluralism and, 67–68 in schools, 68–69 Religion-affiliated schools, 263. See also Parochial schools Religious activities in public schools, 194–197 Religious education, 191, 192 Religious education associations, 478–479 Renaissance, education during, 243–244 Reproduction as role of school, 97–98 Research, keeping up with, 264 Resegregation, 197 risk of, 200 Residence, right to education and, 219 Resiliency, 90 Responsibilities. See Students’ rights and responsibilities; Teachers’ rights and responsibilities Retention, debate over, 102–103 Revenue. See Financing; Taxes Reverse discrimination, 202 Rewards for being accountable, 178 Roman education, 240–241 Rose v. The Council for Better Education Inc., 171 Rubrics for performance assessment, 402, 404, 405 Rural communities, 69–70

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

private, 161–162 professional learning communities and, 479 public opinion on, 297 public’s view of, 6–8 purposes of, 98–101 religion-affiliated, 263 religion in, 68–69 report cards for, 178–179 roles of, 97–98 subject-centered, 428 survival of, 473–474 teaching tolerance in, 116–117 year-round, 160 School-based politics, 164 School boards local, 148 politics and, 164 powers and duties of, 148–149 state, 152–153 teacher employment contracts and, 207 School choice, 159–162 charter schools and, 160 home schooling and, 162 magnet schools and, 159–160 private, parochial, and independent schools and, 161–162 in public schools, 166–167 vouchers and, 160–161 year-round schools and, 160 School districts consolidation of, 273–274 curriculum evaluation by, 432 curriculum management by, 430–431 location of, 13–14 organization of, 148 politics and, 163 report cards for, 178–179 School environments, humanistic, 351–352 School improvement plans (SIPs), 426–427, 446–447 School records, Buckley Amendment and, 214 School reform, 297, 445–449 accelerated schools and, 447 Institute for Learning approach for, 447 model for high schools and, 447–448 multiple intelligences and, 448–449 school improvement and, 446–447 Success For All model for, 447 Schools in need of improvement (SINOI) under No Child Left Behind Act, 157–158 School support staff, roles and responsibilities of, 145–147 Searches of students and lockers, 226–227 Secondary schools, 244 need for, 254–255 school reform model for, 447–448 Segregation and desegregation, 197–201 de facto segregation and, 197 de jure segregation and, 197 present status of integration and, 200–201 release from court orders and, 199–200 separate but equal doctrine and, 198, 199 Separate but equal doctrine, 198 Serrano v. Priest, 171 Seven Cardinal Principles, 284 Seven liberal arts, 242

Sex discrimination against students, 224 Sex education, 245–246 Sexism, 82–83 Sexual harassment by peers, 227 Sexuality, 90–92 Sexual orientation, 63 parenting and, 85 SFA (Success For All) model, 447 Shortages of teachers, 14 Signing bonuses, 32, 34–35 SINOI (schools in need of improvement) under No Child Left Behind Act, 157–158 SIPs (school improvement plans), 426–427, 446–447 Site-based decision making (SBDM), 144 Slates, 259 Slavery, 260–261 Smith-Hughes Act, 256 Smith-Lever Agricultural Extension Act, 256 Social development as purpose of schools, 100–101 Socialization, 81 progressivism and, 349 Social justice, 114–115 teaching for, 132–134 Social stratification, 51 Society culture and, 45–47 power in, 79–83 public’s view of teachers and schools and, 6–8 teachers’ importance to, 5–6 Socioeconomic status, 47, 51–54 class structure and, 51–52 poverty and, 52–54 social stratification and, 51 Sociological perspective, 41 Sociological studies, 294 Socratic dialogue to enhance reflective learning, 316 Socratic method, 239–240 Space, classroom climate and, 376 Special education programs, growth of, 275 Staff relationships, 143 Standards assessment and. See Assessments differences among, reasons for, 391–392 discipline-based (content), 391, 393–394 opportunity-to-learn, 118, 395 performance, 394–395 real-world, 390 setting, debates over, 396–397 sources for, 392–393 state setting of, 430 for teaching profession, 17–18 uses of, 392 world-class, 390 Standards-based education, 389–396 conceptions of standards and, 390–392 debates over setting standards and, 395–396 future of, 396 sources for standards and, 392–393 types of standards and, 393–395 uses of standards and, 392 State(s) certification and licensure office listing for, 484–485 curriculum evaluation by, 432 curriculum management by, 430 perspective on taxation and education, 170–171 Subject Index

509

Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by A llyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

Task analyses, 434, 435 Taxes, 167–175 courts’ perspective on, 169 income, 170

510

Subject Index

progressive, 168 property, 168–169 regressive, 168–169 sales, 170 state perspective on, 170–171 taxpayer revolt and, 179 Teacher(s) academic quality of, 9–10 accountability of, 178 accreditation of, 18–20 advanced certification of, 22 as change agents, 377–378 cheating by, on high-stakes tests, 324–325, 410–411 conditions of employment for, 206–212 curriculum evaluation by, 432 demand for, 11, 12–15 development of professional commitments and dispositions by, 23 discipline philosophy of, 294–295 diversity among, 15 highly qualified, 157, 416 importance to society, 5–6 job searches and, 35–36 keeping up with research and, 264 as leaders, 378–380 licensure of. See Licensure need for, 273 new, 12 politics and, 165 professional responsibilities of, 22–23 profile of, 8–9 public’s view of, 6–8 ratio to students, 13 recruitment incentives for, 32, 34–35 retention in profession, 11, 36–37 returning, 12 roles and responsibilities of, 145 salaries of, 29–32 school district location and, 13–14 shortages of, 14 as social activists, 130–134 strikes by, 211–212 supply of, 11–12 technologies for teacher productivity and, 455 technology standards for, 450 tenure for, 207–210 voice of, 375–376 working conditions of, 32–33 Teacher certification and licensure, 206–207. See also Certification; Licensure Teacher development specialists, 431 Teacher preparation, 285–289 academies for, 287 apprenticeships for, 287 in colonial America, 286 European beginnings of, 285–286 in mid-twentieth century, 288–289 normal schools for, 287–288 state teachers’ colleges for, 288 teachers as indentured servants and, 286, 287 Teachers on special assignment (TOSAs), 431 Teachers’ rights and responsibilities, 204–217 academic freedom and, 212–215 certification and licensure and, 206–207 collective bargaining and, 211 www.ablongman.com/johnson13e

Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by Allyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

State(s) (continued) responsibility to guarantee equal educational opportunity, 171 revenue and aid provided by, 169–170 State adoption, 430 State aid, 169–171, 175–177 categorical, 175–176 equality of opportunity and, 176–177 foundation programs and, 176–177 general, 175 State boards of education, 152 State departments of education, 152–153 State legislatures, 153, 154 State school officers, 152 State teacher organizations, 477–478 State teachers’ colleges, 288, 289 Stereotyping, 120 Steward B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act, 219–220 Strikes, 211–212 Structured interviews, 24–25 Structured observations, 24 Student(s). See also Youth of today attitudes of, adjusting, 428 drug testing of athletes and, 218 grading of one another’s papers by, 214–215 immigrant, 56 searches of, 226–227 sexual harassment by, 227 voice of, 375–376 Student fees, 172 Student products/projects for performance assessment, 402 Student publications, students’ rights regarding, 225–226 Students’ rights and responsibilities, 217–227 child abuse and neglect and, 224–225 corporal punishment and, 223–224 dress codes and grooming and, 223 marriage and pregnancy and, 224 peer sexual harassment and, 227 right to due process, 220–223 right to education, 219–220 right to sue, 220 searches and, 226–227 sex discrimination and, 224 student publications and, 225–226 of students with disabilities, 226 Student-to-teacher ratios, 13 Subject-centered schools, 428 Substantive due process, 204 free speech and, 222–223 Suburban communities, 70 Success For All (SFA) model, 447 Summarizing educational information, 25 Summative assessments, 400 Superintendents of schools politics and, 164 roles and responsibilities of, 149 Supply of teachers, 11–12 Suspension, procedural due process and, 220–222 Syllabi, 424

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

discrimination and, 211 employment contracts and, 207 liabilities and, 215–217 strikes and, 211–212 tenure and, 207–210 of untenured teachers, 208–210 Teaching. See also Direct instruction analysis of, 293 culturally relevant. See Culturally relevant teaching effective, 293 job websites for, 488–489 of morals, 313 professionalization of, 279, 281 to tests, 17, 324–325 of tolerance, 116–117 of values, 313 Teaching materials. See also Books for ELL students, 442–443, 444 evolution of, 257–260 Teaching positions, searching for, 35–36 Teaching profession. See Development of teaching profession; Education profession Teaching strategies, 438–440 for students with exceptionalities, 442–445 Technologies, 449–460 emerging, 455–458 integrated uses of, 450–451, 452 integrating with curriculum and instruction, 458–460 range of, 451–454 small group and individual learning with, 459 standards for teachers, 450 for teacher productivity, 455 Tenth Amendment, 189–190 Tenure for teachers, 207–210 Tests and testing curriculum and, 424 evolution of, 282–283 exemption of students with disabilities from, 414–415 forced-choice, positivism and, 346 high-stakes, 324–325, 410–411, 412 for licensure, 33 national, 411–412 for teachers, 21, 33 teaching to, 17, 324–325, 411 using same test for all students and, 411 Test scores, disaggregation of, 157 Textbooks, 423–424 selection by school districts, 430–431 Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District, 219, 222 Title IX, girls’ and women’s rights and, 62–63 Tolerance, teaching, 116–117 Torts, 215 TOSAs (teachers on special assignment), 431 Traditions in school culture, 119–120 Transitional programs for exceptional learners, 442 Trends in education, 292–298 analysis of teaching, 293 sociological studies, 294 study of learning process, 294–296 teacher effectiveness and, 293 Twenty-first century education, 465–472 characteristics of change and, 467–468 emphasis on character development and, 471–472

increased accountability focused on student learning and, 470–471 increased competition among schools and, 472 schools as center for delivery of coordinated service and, 471 size of educational change and, 468–470 Unfunded mandates, curriculum selection and, 426 Uniforms, 366–367 Unions, 476–478 collective bargaining and, 211 strikes and, 211–212 U.S. Constitution, 189–190 evolution of education and, 255 First Amendment to, 190 Fourteenth Amendment to, 190 Nineteenth Amendment to, 291 Tenth Amendment to, 189–190 U.S. Department of Education, 155, 156 Universal elementary education, struggle for, 252–254 Universities, medieval, 243 Urban communities, 70–71 Validity of assessments, 408–409 Values, teaching of, 313 Videotapes for performance assessment, 402 Video technology, 454 Violence domestic, 88 among youth, 94–95 Vision of teachers, 379 Voice, 375–376 classroom climate and, 375–376 of students, validating, 123–124 Voice recognition technology, 457–458 Vouchers, 160–161 Wallace v. Jaffree, 195 Websites for teaching jobs, 488–489 Whiteboards, interactive, 455–457 Wireless technology, 453–454 Wisconsin v. Yoder, 273–274 Women education of, 289–291 political participation of, 62 Wood v. Strickland, 219, 220 Workforce readiness as purpose of schools, 99–100 Working conditions, 32–33 World-class standards, 390 World reformation, reconstructionism and, 350 Year-round schools, 160 Youth of today, 89–96. See also Student(s) characteristics of, 89–90 dropping out and, 92–93 drug use by, 93–94 economic realities faced by, 89–90 harassment and bullying among, 95–96 resiliency of, 90 sexuality and, 90–92 violence among, 94–95 Zero tolerance, 221 Zobrest v. Catalina Foothills School District, 193

Subject Index

511

Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by A llyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

Interior Image Credits Andrew Hall/Stone/Getty Images (magnifying glass) Digital Vision/Getty Images (globe)

512 Introduction to the Foundations of American Education, Thirteenth Edition, by James A. Johnson, Diann Musial, Gene E. Hall, Donna M. Gollnick, and Victor L. Dupuis. Published by Allyn and Bacon. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

ISBN: 0-536-27961-6

Photo Credits Page xxxii, © Jim Cummins/CORBIS; p. 2, Comstock Royalty Free Division; p. 5, Lindfors Photography; p. 9, © Laura Dwight Photography; p. 10 (Top), © Jim Cummins/CORBIS; p. 10 (Bottom), © James Leynse/CORBIS SABA; p. 12, Photo by Dennis Nett/Syracuse Newspapers/The Image Works; p. 14, Stephen Marks; p. 16, © Jeffry Myers/Stock Boston; p. 18, Lindfors Photography; p. 23, © Will Faller; p. 40, © Lisette Le Bon/SuperStock; p. 42 © Paul Viant/Getty Images; p. 45, © Bluestone Productions/SuperStock; p. 48, © Jim Cummins/CORBIS; p. 49, © Dennis MacDonald/Photo Edit; p. 57, © Michael Newman/Photo Edit; p. 63, © Li-Hua Lan/The Image Works; p. 65, © Tony Freeman/Photo Edit; p. 68, © Lon C. Diehl/Photo Edit; p. 69, © Joe Bator/The Stock Market; p. 76, © Kevin Radford/ SuperStock; p. 79, © Will and Deni McIntyre/CORBIS; p. 84, © Bob Daemmrich/The Image Works; p. 87, © Rob Crandall/The Image Works; p. 90, © David Young-Wolff/Photo Edit; p. 91, © Will Hart/PhotoEdit; p. 95, © David Young-Wolff/Photo Edit; p. 99, © Elyse Lewn/Getty Images; p. 100, © Robert Harbison; p. 110, © Laura Dwight Photography; p. 113, © Paul Chesley/Getty Images; p. 115, © Mike Maple/Woodfin Camp & Associates; p. 119, © Pete Saloutos/CORBIS; p. 121, © Jeffry Myers/Stock Boston; p. 123, © Laura Dwight Photography; p. 125, © Greg Pease/Getty Images; p. 131, © Laura Dwight Photography; p. 133, © Sylvia Johnson/Woodfin Camp & Associates; p. 138, © Bohdan Hrynewych/Stock Boston/PictureQuest; p. 140, © Michael Newman/Photo Edit; p. 144, © Laura Dwight Photography; p. 148, © Bob Daemmrich/The Image Works; p. 151, © Matthew McVay/Getty Images; p. 154, © Najlan Feanny/Stock Boston; p. 159, Sally & Derk Kuyper; p. 163, AP/Wide World Photos; p. 172, © Brian Parker/Tom Stack & Assoc.; p. 177, Lindfors Photography; p. 186, © Michael Newman/Photo Edit; p. 189, North Wind Picture Archives; p. 193, © Photo Disc/Getty Images; p. 194, © Annie Griffiths Belt/CORBIS; p. 198, © Will Hart; p. 207, © Jamea J. Bissell/SuperStock; p. 211, © Rashid/Monkmeyer; p. 216, © Will Hart; p. 220, © Michael Newman/PhotoEdit; p. 223, © Gabe Palmer/CORBIS; p. 226, © Bob Daemmrich/Stock Boston; p. 232, © Michael Krasowitz/Getty Images; p. 234, © Genevieve Naylor/CORBIS; p. 237, © R. W. Jones/CORBIS; p. 240, © Araldo de Luca/CORBIS; p. 244 (Both), 246, North Wind Picture Archives; p. 248, © Archivo Iconografico, S. A./CORBIS; p. 249 (Top), North Wind Picture Archives; p. 249 (Middle), Library of Congress; p. 249 (Bottom), © Bettmann/CORBIS; p. 253, Courtesy of the Blackwell Collection, Northern Illinois University; p. 257 (Both), 258, 259, North Wind Picture Archives; p. 260, © CORBIS; p. 262, Library of Congress; p. 263, North Wind Picture Archives; p. 270, © Kwame Zikomo/SuperStock; p. 273, Brown Brothers; p. 276, © Will Hart; p. 278, Culver Pictures; p. 281, © James Marshall/The Image Works; p. 282, © Robert Harbison; p. 288, © Minnesota Historical Society/CORBIS; p. 289, © CORBIS; p. 290, Courtesy of the Blackwell Collection, Northern Illinois University; p. 291, Library of Congress; p. 296 (Top), © CORBIS; p. 296 (Bottom), Lyrl Ahern; p. 302, © Pierre Tremblay/Masterfile; p. 304, © Charles Gupton/ CORBIS; p. 312, © Gabe Palmer/CORBIS; p. 317 (Top), © Araldo de Luca/CORBIS; p. 317 (Bottom), 319 (Top), North Wind Picture Archives; p. 319 (Bottom), 320, 321, Courtesy of the Blackwell Collection, Northern Illinois University; p. 323, Courtesy of the Special Collections, Milbank Memorial Library, Teachers College, Columbia University; p. 327, North Wind Picture Archives; p. 329, © Lawrence Migdale/Stock Boston; p. 334, © Superstock/PictureQuest; p. 340, © Tom & Dee Ann McCarthy/CORBIS; p. 343, © Mark Richards/Photo Edit; p. 345 (Top), © Stockbyte/PictureQuest; p. 345 (Bottom), © ThinkStock/ SuperStock; p. 347, Courtesy of the Blackwell Collection, Northern Illinois University; p. 349, © Myrleen Ferguson Cate/Photo Edit; p. 350, The Paulo Freire Archives; p. 351, © Archivo Iconografico, S. A./CORBIS; p. 352, © Laura Dwight Photography; p. 355, © David Young-Wolff/Photo Edit; p. 360, © Superstock/PictureQuest; p. 364, © Richard Hutchings/Photo Edit; p. 365, © Mary Kate Denny/Photo Edit; p. 368, © BananaStock/ Superstock; p. 369, Lindfors Photography; p. 376, © Will Hart; p. 377 (Top), © Laura Dwight Photography; p. 377 (Bottom), Comstock Royalty Free Division; p. 379, © Mark Richards/ Photo Edit; p. 384, © Stockbyte/Superstock; p. 386, © Steve Lyne, Rex Interstock/Stock Connection/PictureQuest; p. 389, © Spencer Grant/Photo Edit; p. 390, © Joe Sohm/The Image Works; p. 391, © Charles Gupton/CORBIS; p. 397, © Laura Dwight Photography; p. 399, © Charles Gupton/CORBIS; p. 401, © David Young-Wolff/Photo Edit; p. 402, © Mug Shots/CORBIS; p. 408, © Dennis MacDonald/Photo Edit; p. 420, © Tom Stewart/CORBIS; p. 423, © Jose Luis Pelaez Inc./CORBIS; p. 425, © Tom Stewart/CORBIS; p. 427, AP/Wide World Photos; p. 435, © Michelle D. Bridwell/Photo Edit; p. 437, © Tom Stewart/CORBIS; p. 444, © David Young-Wolff/Photo Edit; p. 455, © Robin Sachs/Photo Edit; p. 464, © Mary Kate Denny/Photo Edit; p. 470, © Steven Begleiter/IndexStock; p. 475, © Jeff Greenberg/ IndexStock.

Sponsor Documents

Hide

Forgot your password?

Or register your new account on INBA.INFO

Hide

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link to create a new password.

Back to log-in

Close