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CO LE E OF E GINEERING TU EN  HANDBOO  

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2013/14   hemical ngin erin

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DISCLAIMER The College has made all reasonable efforts to ensure that the information contained within this publication is accurate and up-todate when published but can accept no responsibility for any errors or omissions. The College reserves the right to revise, alter or discontinue degree programmes or modules and to amend regulations and procedures at any time, but every effort will be made to notify interested parties. It should be noted that not every module listed in this handbook may be available every year, and changes may be made to the details of the modules. You are advised to contact the College directly if you require further information.

The 2013/2014 academic year begins on 23 September 2013

DATES OF 2013/14 TERMS

23 September 2013– 13 December 2013 6 January 2014 – 11 April 2014 5 May 2014 – 13 June 2014 This website stores data such as cookies to enable essential site functionality, as well as marketing, personalization, and analytics. You may change your settings at any time or accept the default settings.

SEMESTER 1

30 September 2013 – 24 January 2014 SEMESTER 2

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27 January 2014 – 13 June 2014

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WELCOME 

We would like to extend a very warm welcome to all  students for the 2013/14 academic year and in  particular, to those  joining  joining the College for the first time.  The  University  offers  an  enviable  range  of   facilities  and  resources  to  enable  you  to  pursue  your  chosen course of  study whilst enjoying university life.  In particular, the College of  Engineering offers  you  an  environment  where  you  can  develop  and  extend  your  knowledge,  skills  and  abilities.  The  College  has  excellent  facilities,  offering  extensive  laboratory,  workshop  and  IT  equipment  and  support.  The  staff   in  the  College,  many  of   whom  are  world  experts  in  their  areas  of   interest,  are  involved  in  many  exciting  projects,  often  in  collaboration  with  industry.  The  College  has  excellent  links with industry, with many companies kindly contributing to the College’s activities through guest  lectures  and  student  projects.  We  have  close  links  with  professional  engineering  bodies  and  this  ensures  that  our  courses  are  in  tune  with  current  thinking  and  meet  the  requirements  of   graduate  employers.  We  are  keen  to  provide  a  supportive  environment  for  our  students  and  we  hope  that  you will take full advantage of  your opportunities and time at Swansea.  We hope that you will enjoy the next academic session and wish you every success.  Professor Javier Bonet  Head, College of  Engineering 

Professor Steve Brown  Deputy  Head, and  Head  of  Learning and  Teaching 

INTRODUCTION 

The College has a Student Reception Office which is located in the Faraday Building Foyer. The office  is  open  each  day  from  08.45  until  04.30.  We  aim  to  offer  a  friendly,  welcoming  and  professional  service  to  all  students.  The  office  is  able  to  provide  information  about  student  handbooks  and  timetables,  advise  on  a  range  of   matters  and  act  as  a  ‘gateway’  to  other  staff   within  the  College  whom  you  may  wish  to  get  in  contact  with.  Any  queries  relating  to  Part  2  (Dissertation  Module),  please call in to the Postgraduate Research Office (Room 131).  The Student Reception Office can also assist with updating student cards for access to our 24 hour IT  rooms and providing forms for students who have been ill or have extenuating circumstances.  CONTACTS  Course Coordinator 

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Dr Peter Douglas  Email: [email protected] 

Part 1   – – Debbie Nickson ([email protected] [email protected]))  Part 2 (Dissertation)   – – Ruth Baker (Room 131 Faraday Building)  email: [email protected] 

 

Level MSc 2013/14 Chemical Engineering MSc Chemical Engineering   Coordinator: Dr. P Douglas Semester 1 Modules EG-M01 Complex Fluids and Flows 10 Credits Dr. MS Barrow

Semester 2 Modules EGDM01 Colloid and Interface Science 10 Credits Dr. CM Mcfarlane

EG-M47 Entrepreneurship Entrepreneurs hip for Engineers 10 Credits Professor K Board

Choose from Module Group 2

EGIM16 Communication Skills for Research Engineers 10 Credits Dr. TN Croft Choose from Module Group 1 Choose from Module Group 1

Choose from Module Group 2 Choose from Module Group 2

EGCM10B MSc Research Practice 30 Credits Dr. RW Lovitt Research Project EGCM30 MSc Dissertation - Chemical Engineering 60 Credits Dr. RW Lovitt Total 180 Credits EG-M09 EGCM38 Module Group 1 EGTM79 EG-M07 EGCM36 EGCM40 2 This Module website Group stores data such as EGNM04 cookies to enable essential site EGNM07 functionality, as well as marketing, EGTM89 personalization, and analytics. You may change your settings at any time or accept the default settings.

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Water and Wastewater Engineering (Dr. C Tizaoui) Membrane Technology (Dr. DL Oatley-Radcliffe) Environmental Analysis and Legislation (Dr. JC Arnold) Optimisation and Reliability (Professor DE Reeve) Desalination (Dr. PM Williams) Pollutant transport by groundwater flows (Dr. B Sandnes) Nanoscale Structures and Devices (Mr. TGG Maffeis/...) Principles of Nanomedicine (Professor HD Summers) Polymers: Properties and Design (Dr. DH Isaac)

10 credits 10 credits 10 credits 10 credits 10 credits 10 credits 10 credits 10 credits 10 credits

TB1 TB1 TB1 TB2 TB2 TB2 TB2 TB2 TB2

 

EG-M01 Complex Fluids and Flows Credits: 10 Session: 2013/14 Semester 1 (Sep-Jan Modular) Module Aims: This module describes advanced aspects of transport processes involving non-Newtonian materials with particular reference to viscoelastic systems and the Rheological properties of other time-dependent materials. The module considers methods for the characterisation of complex fluids and associated engineering calculations for pipeline transport and other flow scenarios encountered in manufacturing processes. Pre-requisite Modules: Co-requisite Modules: Incompatible Modules: Lectures (20h); Directed private study (80h) Format: Lecturer(s): Dr. MS Barrow Assessment: Examination 1 (75%) Assignment 1 (10%) Assignment 2 (15%) Assessment Description: Coursework 1 (10%): Individual assignment Coursework 2 (15%): Individual assignment Guidance will be issued via Blackboard. Failure Redemption: Eligibility for the redemption process is subject to the degree scheme and the associated progression/completion criteria; where permitted, a supplementary examination will form 100% of the mark. Assessment Feedback: Feedback will be available from the lecturer. Module Content: Non-Newtonian fluid mechanics, including aspects of: Applications of industrial rheology Definition of shear viscosity, shear stress and shear rate. Rotational viscometry (non-oscillatory testing) Yield Stress, Bingham plastic materials with particular emphasis on flow behavior in concentric cylinder geometries. Poiseulle Flow. Pumping of non-Newtonian fluids including: Power law fluids, Bingham plastics, yield pseudoplastics, Hershel Bulkley fluids. Time-dependent behavior of fluids, thixotropy, rheopexy. Rheological models including : Power-law, Carreau, Cross, Ellis and Casson fluid models. The Boltzmann Superposition Principle. Viscoelasticity – Maxwell, Kelvin-Voigt and Burgers models. Relaxation time, Retardation time. Time effects in viscoelastic flows- Deborah number, Weissenberg number. Small amplitude oscillatory flow, complex shear modulus. Oscillatory flow – Maxwell model. Measurement of rheological parameters using different viscometer/rheometer systems.

Intended Learning Outcomes: The student should be able to: Employ basic calculus to derive key mathematical relationships. Describe experimental data sets using regression analysis and model equations. Understand non-Newtonian flow and viscoelastic systems. Visualise non-Newtonian This website data such asdrops in flow situations. Use flow models to describe non-Newtonian flow behaviour. fluid flow. stores Describe pressure cookies to enable essential site Describe viscoelastic solid and viscoelastic liquid models in oscillatory shear flow and stress relaxation. Understand functionality, as well as marketing, sol-gel transition phenomena in terms of viscoelastic theory (linear) and the relaxation time spectrum. Describe personalization, and analytics. You qualitatively andsettings quantitatively non-Newtonian flow in simple geometries. may change your at any time Coulson & Richardson, Chemical Engineering Volume 1 (6th Ed), Butterworth-Heinemann, List: orReading accept the default settings. 1999.ISBN: 0-7506-4444-3 Additional Notes: This module contains coursework: The college of Engineering has a ZERO TOLERANCE penalty Privacy policyPolicy for the late submission of all coursework. Marketing Personalization Analytics Save

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EG-M07 Optimisation and Reliability Credits: 10 Session: 2013/14 Semester 2 (Jan - Jun Modular) Module Aims: This module provides an introduction to important techniques of optimisation and reliability that may be used across a broad range of engineering disciplines. Numerical examples are employed to illustrate concepts. Pre-requisite Modules: Co-requisite Modules: Incompatible Modules: Lectures 20 hours; Format: Example classes/surgeries 10 hours; Directed private study 70 hours Lecturer(s): Professor DE Reeve Assessment: Examination 1 (70%) Coursework 1 (15%) Coursework 2 (15%) Assessment Description: Exam - closed book exam Coursework 1 - calculation problem. This is an individual piece of coursework  Coursework 2 - calculation problem. This is an individual piece of coursework  Failure Redemption: A supplementary examination will form 100% of the module mark. Assessment Feedback: Written feedback on coursework + opportunity for further verbal feedback around lecture discussions. Exam - written feedback. Module Content: Indicative syllabus content: 1. Statement of the optimisation problem; objective function; design vector; types of constraint; classification of  optimisation problem. 2. Least squares techniques 3. Maximum likelihood method 4. One-Dimensional Minimisation Methods. Direct and indirect methods:unrestricted search; dichotomous search; golden section method; quadratic interpolation; Newton's procedures. 5. The Hessian; Concavity and convexity 6. Multidimensional Minimisation Problems - direct methods such as:Taxi-cab; conjugate search procedures; Powell's method 7. Multidimensional Minimisation Problems - indirect methods such as: Steepest descent method; Newton's method. 8. Concepts in reliability theory 9. Extreme value distributions 10. First order reliability methods. Intended Learning Outcomes: The student should: • Understand and be able to set up and carry out the necessary calculations for univariate unimodal optimisation problems • Be able to use search techniques to determine the optima of unconstrained multivariable systems • Understand and be able to set up and carry out the necessary calculations for First Order Reliability problems This website stores such as D M Himmelblau, Optimisation of Chemical Processes, McGraw-Hill.ISBN: 0-07Edgar and Reading List: T Fdata cookies to enable essential site 018991-9 functionality, as well as marketing, James, Advanced engineering mathematics, Addison Wesley, 1993.ISBN: 0-201-56519-6 personalization, and modern analytics. You Matousek, understanding may change your settings at and any using time linear programming, springer, 2007.ISBN: 978-3-540-30697-9 Risk and settings. reliability: coastal and hydraulic engineering, Spon Press, 2009.ISBN: ISBN13: 978-0-415-46755-1 orReeveD, accept the default (hardback) / ISBN13: 978-0-203-89552-8 (ebook) Additional Notes: The course assumes good A-level mathematical skills. In addition candidates without good Privacy Policy of partial differentiation, Taylor series expansion, matrices, eigenvalues and introductory probability understanding theory will be expected to undertake the necessary supplementary effort to attain this knowledge outside the demands Marketing of this module. Personalization Analytics Failure to sit an examination or submit work by the specified date will result in a mark of 0% being recorded. The College of Engineering has a ZERO TOLERANCE penalty policy for late submission of all coursework and continuous assessment. Save Accept All

 

EG-M09 Water and Wastewater Engineering Credits: 10 Session: 2013/14 Semester 1 (Sep-Jan Modular) Module Aims: This module aims to deliver a working knowledge of water and wastewater treatment processes. The module will cover various physical, chemical and biological unit operations used in the treatment of water and wastewater. This module will particularly emphasise the design and operational issues related to these unit operations. Moreover, the module will cover regulatory aspects related to water quality and requirements for water and wastewater treatment. Pre-requisite Modules: Co-requisite Modules: Incompatible Modules: Lectures 20 hours Example classses 10 hours Directed private study 70 hours Lecturer(s): Dr. C Tizaoui Assessment: Examination (50%) Other (Coursework) (50%) Assessment Description: 2 hour exam in January (50%) Coursework (<1500 word equivalent) (50%) - The coursework may be done individually or in groups, this will be confirmed at the time of setting the work. Failure Redemption: A supplementary 2hr examination will form 100% of the module mark. Assessment Feedback: Exam result and exam general feedback forms common across College. Assignment feedback will be given by individual i ndividual written comments, one-to-one comments and assignment mark. Module Content: Water resources, quantities, water quality and standards. Types and sources of water pollution and requirements for treatment. Design population. [2] Format:

Wastewater terminology, sources, composition and characteristics, flow rates and collection systems. Aims of  wastewater treatment and standards. Sampling methods. [4] Wastewater’s physical treatment processes, types and design: equalisation basins, screening, grit removal and settling [4] Secondary treatment overview. Microbial growth kinetics. Suspended growth biological reactors. The activated sludge process. Design and modelling of the activated sludge process. Tertiary treatment [4] Natural Treatment Systems: Constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment [2] Drinking water treatment. Selection of typical treatment processes. Design and operation of physical treatment unit operations: flotation, coagulation and flocculation, filtration. Water treatment works sludge [2] Chemical oxidation and disinfection [2] Intended Learning Outcomes: After completing this module, students should be able to demonstrate: a knowledge and understanding of: the methods used to quantify pollution load in wastewater; the role and general principles of the main physical processes used in wastewater treatment; the principles of secondary wastewater treatment using suspended growth systems and those using fixed/adhering microbes; an understanding of drinking water quality and treatment techniques. an ability to (thinking skills): analyse the operation of water and wastewater treatment plants; synthesise the stages and processes necessary to treat a given water supply or wastewater; identify problems in treatment equipment; This website stores data such as assimilate further knowledge relating to drinking water and wastewater treatment and critically appraise sources of  cookies to enable essential site information relating to treatment practice. functionality, as well as marketing, an ability to (practical skills): manipulate the physical, chemical and biological data relating to water and wastewater personalization, and analytics. You treatment; meaningful technical dialogue with other engineers who are expert in the field of wastewater may change have your settings at any time ortreatment; accept thepresent default reasoned settings. argument relating to the design of treatment plants. an ability to (key skills): use computer packages in solving technical problems; write technical reports and reviews; use traditional library and ICT facilities. Privacy Policy Reading List: M. Winkler, (F) Biological Treatment of Waste-Water, Ellis Horwood Publishers, 1981.ISBN: 085312-422-1 Marketing Metcalf and Eddy , Wastewater Treatment, McGraw-Hill Inc. , 1990.ISBN: 0-07-041690-7 Personalization Tchobanoglous, George., Burton, Franklin L., Stensel, H. David., Metcalf & Eddy, Inc., Wastewater engineering : Analytics treatment and reuse , Metcalf & Eddy, Inc., 2003.ISBN: 9780071122504 Simon Judd, Process Science and Engineering for Water and Wastewater Treatment, IWA Publishing, 2008.ISBN: 1 900222752 Save Accept All

 

Additional Notes: Available to visiting and exchange students. The College of Engineering has a ZERO TOLERANCE penalty policy for late submission of all a ll coursework and continuous assessment.

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EG-M47 Entrepreneurship for Engineers Credits: 10 Session: 2013/14 Semester 1 (Sep-Jan Modular) Module Aims: To establish the principles of entrepreneurship and the role engineers have in successful business enterprises. Pre-requisite Modules: Co-requisite Modules: Incompatible Modules: Lectures 20 hours Format: Example classes / Laboratory work 10 hours Directed private study 76 hours Lecturer(s): Professor K Board Assessment: Group Work - Coursework (80%) Coursework 1 (20%) Assessment Description: The group assignment will require application of the concepts of entrepreneurship. The assignment will require the delivery of a presentation and the submission of a business plan. The individual assignment will consist of a 600 word essay. Failure Redemption: 100% coursework. Assessment Feedback: Mainly through the group interviews held at the end of the course. Module Content: What is an entrepreneur and why enterprise matters; the six dimensions of entrepreneurship, structure and presentation of opportunities, sources and structure of finance, people and teams. How enterprise is managed internationally, managing early and long-term growth, harvesting and buy-out, sustaining the flow of ideas within a company, case-studies. Intended Learning Outcomes: After completing this module you should be able to: • Describe how opportunities are identified and a business plan is generated in order to get started • List the sources of finance that exist and how they are structured • Analyse the role of people and what makes a winning team • Discuss a case history that lead to success • Explain how early growth is managed • Analyse how failure can occur and how to guard against it • Explain how enterprise can be sustained within an organisation as it grows Reading List: Birley and Muzyka, Mastering Enterprise, Financial Times Publication, 1997.ISBN: 027363031 Bridge, O'Neill and Martin, Understanding Enterprise, Entrepreneurship and Small Business, Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.ISBN: 0230552706 Additional Notes: The College of Engineering has a ZERO TOLERANCE penalty policy for late submission of all coursework and continuous assessment Related assignments are used to assess this module.

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EGCM10B MSc Research Practice Credits: 30 Session: 2013/14 Semester 1 and 2 (Sep-Jun Modular) Module Aims: A Masters Level course to deliver knowledge and skills on how to write and submit scientific papers and reports. The course requires that the students prepare a draft publication of journal quality. The whole process is examined from the presentation of data in a suitable form for publication to the final draft that is suitable for electronic submission. In addition the students undertake up to 20 hours lab based experimental team project on pilot equipment where appropriate. The research data is then used to write a joint report of the work, which will be assessed. For the paper writing, original data is provided and the students must put this in a suitable manuscript. They must make a reasoned choice of journal; then follow the format required by that specified Journal and its instructions. They will be asked to write a concise introduction to the paper with an updated literature survey. They must present results appropriately and of the correct quality and then describe and discuss these. Pre-requisite Modules: Co-requisite Modules: Incompatible Modules: Format: 50 Lecturer(s): Dr. RW Lovitt Assessment: Other (Coursework) (100%) Assessment Description: Assignment 1. Introduction and c.v. presentation. This is an individual piece of coursework  Assignment 2. World issues in engineering (presentation and report). This coursework is conducted and assessed in groups Assignment 3 Literature survey. Detailed and critcal assessment of research problem or topic. This is an individual piece of coursework and the candidate will get a choice of topics Assignment 4. Practical report. This coursework is conducted and assessed in groups Assignment 5. Paper writting. This is an individual piece of coursework  Failure Redemption: There is possible condonment for narrow fails. Resubmission of individually i ndividually assessed coureswork in the summer. Assessment Feedback: Individual feedback on marked assigments. Module report. Module Content: 1. The preparation of a presentation in small groups (2 lectures) (5% marks) 2. The preparation of a substantial literature survey (up to 5000 words) on a topic in chemical or biochemical engineering and a presentation of 15 minutes duration of the survey (2 lectures) (40% marks) 3. The preparation of a draft publication of journal quality. The whole process is examined from the presentation of 

This website stores data such as data in a suitable form for publication to the final draft that is suitable for electronic submission. For the paper writing cookies to enable essential site - original data is provided and the students must put this in a suitable technical context, they must justify the choice of  functionality, as well as marketing,  journal; then follow the format by that specified Journal and its instruction instructions. s. This will include an abstract, personalization, and analytics. Yourequired by graphical research highlights, a concise manuscript including introduction to the paper with an updated may changeabstract, your settings at any time survey and appropriate referencing. They must present results appropriately, of the correct quality and then orliterature accept the default settings.

describe and discuss these. A conclusion section must also be presented. Finally the paper should finish with correctly formated references (2000-4000 words) (6 lectures) (40%).

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4. The students undertake a lab based experimental team project (up to 20 hours) using pilot scale equipment. The Marketing information generated is recorded in a laboratory notebook along with the experimental procedures and methods used. Personalization This data is then used to write a joint report of the work. This is then assessed (15% total mark). Analytics

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Intended Learning Outcomes: The student will be able to gather, write and present data derived from several sources: - be able to work on a joint presentation. - be able to organise and write a substancial literature survey paper and present it orally. - be able to organise and write a technical paper. - be able to keep a good lab book and produce a lab report. Reading List: Additional Notes: Zero tolerance on assignments is applied.

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EGCM30 MSc Dissertation - Chemical Engineering Credits: 60 Session: 2013/14 Summer (July - September Modular) Module Aims: The dissertation study will generally be carried out on a research topic associated with, and supervised by, a member of staff in the SPEC, CCFP or Cwater. Study for the dissertation, which may be based on practical, industrial, or literature work, or any combination of these, is carried out over a period of about 12 weeks, with the dissertation submitted at the end of September. Pre-requisite Modules: Co-requisite Modules: Incompatible Modules: Typically 1 hour per week i.e. 10-15 hrs total contact time. Each student is to be supervised in Format: accordance with the University's Policy on Supervision, with a minimum of three meetings held. A careful record should be kept, agreed between supervisor and student, of all such formal meetings, including dates, action agreed and deadlines set. Lecturer(s): Dr. RW Lovitt Assessment: Other (Coursework) (100%) Assessment Description: The research project and dissertation forms Part Two of the Masters degree. Information about dissertation preparation and submission can be found at: http://www.swan.ac.uk/registry/academicguide/assessmentandprogres http://www.swan.ac.uk/regis try/academicguide/assessmentandprogress/dissertationpreparationsubmission s/dissertationpreparationsubmission/  /  Additionally, students should refer to: http://www.swan.ac.uk/registry/academicguide/postgraduatetaughtawardsregu http://www.swan.ac.uk/regis try/academicguide/postgraduatetaughtawardsregulations/postgraduatetaughtmastersde lations/postgraduatetaughtmastersde grees/17submissionofdissertation/  The word limit is 20,000. This is for the main text and does not include appendices (if any), essential footnotes, introductory parts and statements or the bibliography and index. Each student is to submit two soft bound copies and an electronic copy of the dissertation (CD with dissertation in Pdf format) to the College Postgraduate Administration Team by the deadline of 30th September. Each copy must contain: • a statement that it is being submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree; • a summary of the dissertation not exceeding 300 words in length; • a statement, signed by you, showing to what extent the work submitted is the result of your own investigation. Acknowledgement of other sources shall be made by footnotes giving explicit references. A full bibliography should be appended to the work; • a declaration, signed by you, to certify that the work has not already been accepted in substance for any degree, and is not being concurrently submitted in candidature for any degree; and • a signed statement regarding availability of the thesis. The dissertation is marked by the supervisor and another member of staff and sent to an External Examiner for moderation. If necessary a further member of staff may be involved, if there are disparate views. An Internal Exam Board is then held to confirm the mark. Finally, all marks are ratified at the University Postgraduate Taught This website stores data such as Examination Board. cookies to enable essential site Failure Redemption: Candidates who fail the dissertation are given an opportunity to resubmit the dissertation within functionality, as well as marketing, 3 months of the result of theYou examination if a full-time student or 6 months for part-time students. Such students will personalization, and analytics. be given one formal feedback session, including written feedback on the reasons for failure, immediately following may change your settings at any time orconfirmation accept the default of thesettings. result by the University Postgraduate Taught Examination Board. The opportunity to resubmit will only be offered to students who submit a dissertation and are awarded a fail. Those candidates who do not submit a dissertation will not be offered a resubmission opportunity. Privacy Policy Feedback: The student will receive feed back in the form of: Assessment An assessment Marketing of their project drafting skills, from the supervisor during the planning and drafting of the dissertation. An assessment marksheet that includes marks for specific aspects (Understanding, qualitative and quantitative aspects, Personalization presentation) of the dissertation plus an overall comment on the specific aspect of the dissertation by the assessors. Analytics

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Module Content: The dissertation study will generally be carried out on a research topic associated with, and supervised by, a member of staff in the SPEC or Cwater. Study for the dissertation, which may be based on practical, industrial, or literature work, or any combination of these, is carried out over a period of about 12 weeks, with the dissertation being submitted at the end of September. Preparatory work on the dissertation may take place during Part One of the programme but students will only be permitted to submit their dissertation following successful completion of Part One. The student will meet regularly with the supervisor to ensure that the project is well developed and organised. Progress will be monitored. Intended Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module, students should have the ability to: • investigate a research topic in detail; • formulate research aims; • devise and plan a research strategy to fulfil the aims; • carry out research work - undertake a literature search, a laboratory based or computer based investigation or a combination of these; • gather, organize and use evidence, data and information from a variety of primary and secondary sources; • critically analyse information; • make conclusions supported by the work and identify their relevance to the broader research area; • resolve or refine a research problem, with reasoned suggestions about how to improve future research efforts in the field; and • produce a report (dissertation), with the findings presented in a well organised and reasoned manner. Reading List: Additional Notes: This is a good opportunity for the student to specialise and explore a specific topic related to the masters degree. This scope and feasibility can be determined with consultation with the academic staff and the resources available. The College of Engineering has a ZERO TOLERANCE penalty policy for late submission of all a ll coursework and continuous assessment. If an extension is deemed appropriate a Postgraduate Taught Masters 'Application for Extension to the Submission Deadline/ Period of Candidature' Form will need to be submitted as follows: • 31 August – deadline for Part Two students (non-resit students) • 8 November – deadline for Part Two Students (students who had resits)

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EGCM36 Desalination Credits: 10 Session: 2013/14 Semester 2 (Jan - Jun Modular) Module Aims: Desalination is an important process in the management of water resources and it has a large societal, economic and environmental impact. This module will give engineering students a solid grounding in desalination and related separation processes. This will prove invaluable for a future career in many areas of engineering. Pre-requisite Modules: Co-requisite Modules: Incompatible Modules: Lectures 20 hours Format: Design classes/tutorials 10 hours Directed private study 70 hours Lecturer(s): Dr. PM Williams Assessment: Examination 1 (75%) Coursework 1 (10%) Coursework 2 (15%) Assessment Description: Examination: End of year examination accounting for 75% of the total course mark  Coursework: Coursework 1: Tutorial sheet with various numerical problems for 10% of the total course mark. This is an individual piece of coursework. Coursework 2: Project on issue with desalination (either essay/excel project) 15% of the total course mark. This is an individual piece of coursework. Failure Redemption: A supplementary examination will form 100% of the module mark. Assessment Feedback: Exam feedback will be given via exam results and the exam feedback forms available on the Swansea University intranet. Module Content: 1. Introduction: Resources and Need for Water desalination; Composition of Seawater; Definition and Classification of Industrial Desalination Processes. 2. Single Effect Evaporation: Single Effect Evaporation; Evaporators; Single Effect Thermal Vapour Compression; Single Effect Mechanical Vapour Compression; Single Effect Absorption Vapour Compression; Single Effect Adsorption Vapour Compression. 3. Multiple Effect Evaporation: Forward Feed Multiple Effect Evaporation; Parallel Feed Multiple Effect Evaporation. 4. Multi Stage Flash Distillation: MSF; Flashing Stage; Once through MSF; Brine through MSF; MSF with Thermal Vapour Compression; MSF with Brine Mixing. 5. Reverse Osmosis: Elements of membrane Separation; Performance Parameters; RO Membranes; Membrane Modules; Design of RO Systems; Case studies; RO Feed Treatment, Biofouling and Membrane Cleaning. 6. Alternative methods of desalination. Intended Learning Outcomes: After completing this module students should be able to: - Demonstrate a systematic understanding of different desalination systems. This website stores data such as - Apply cookies to theory enablecritically essential to siteanalyse the mechanisms of desalination technologies. - Make critical evaluation and appreciation of the different thermal and RO membrane modules used in desalination functionality, as well as marketing, industry. personalization, and analytics. You may change settingsfor at which any time - Decide onyour a strategy process (or combination of processes) to implement a desalination process. or- accept the default settings.models for mass and heat transfer in thermal desalination. Formulate mathematical - Develop flowsheeting and detailed design of thermal and RO membrane systems. Reading List: H. T. El-Dessouky and H.M. Ettouney, Fundamentals of Salt Water Desalination, Elsevier, Privacy Policy 2002.ISBN: 9780080532127 MarkMarketing Wilf, The Guidebook to Membrane Desalination Technology, Balaban Desalination Publications, 2007.ISBN: 0866890653 Personalization Roya Sheikholeslami, Fouling in Membranes and thermal Units, Balaban Desalination Publications, 2007.ISBN: Analytics 0866890661 Additional Notes: Available to visiting and exchange students with chemical engineering background. The College has a ZERO TOLERANCE penalty policy for late submission of all a ll coursework and Save of Engineering Accept All continuous assessment.

 

EGCM38 Membrane Technology Credits: 10 Session: 2013/14 Semester 1 (Sep-Jan Modular) Module Aims: A Masters Level course to deliver a working knowledge of liquid phase membrane separation processes. This will include a detailed understanding of current membrane fabrication techniques to produce polymeric hollow fibres and flat sheet membranes and subsequent production of tubular and spiral wound modules. Ceramic membrane production will also be considered. The design, construction and optimisation of membrane plants will be considered with specific emphasis placed on configuration. A detailed understanding of membrane characterisation techniques will be developed, including SEM, AFM, particle sizing, zeta potential measurement, rejection and flux experimentation. The specific operations of membrane microfiltration, ultrafiltration, nanofiltration and reverse osmosis will be investigated and mathematical descriptions will be developed. The course will conclude with a series of practical case studies detailing current applications of membrane processes and scope for future development. Pre-requisite Modules: EG-100; EG-200 Co-requisite Modules: EGCM36; EGDM01 Incompatible Modules: Format: Lectures 20 hours; Example classes 10 hours; Directed private study 70 hours Lecturer(s): Dr. DL Oatley-Radcliffe Assessment: Examination 1 (100%) Assessment Description: Standard format College of Engineering examination. Coursework will be issued in line with the learning activities and representative of the lecture materials. Where possible, coursework will reflect current affairs in Membrane Technology. All coursework is issued individually and should be completed individually. Coursework will be peer reviewed in tutorial classes and feedback issued. Failure Redemption: A supplementary examination will form 100% of the module mark. Assessment Feedback: Informal feedback will be provided during lectures and examples classes. Students will receive peer review on completion of class tutorials. Formal feedback will be provided following completion of the final exam in line with standard College of Engineering protocols. Module Content: Introduction: introduction to membrane processes, classification of membrane processes, the filtration spectrum, the nature of synthetic membranes, fabrication processes, molecular weight cut off, module design and plant configuration Microfiltration: introduction to frontal and cross flow filtration, development of knowledge and understanding of solid liquid separations and cake filtration, general membrane equations and adaptation to cake filtration, calculation of  cake properties, time of filtration, bed depth and process optimisation, case studies Ultrafiltration: introduction to ultrafiltration processes, mass transfer and concentration polarisation effects, simple gel theory, osmotic pressure effects, effects of membrane charge, optimisation of separations, case studies Nanofiltration: introduction to nanofiltration processes, equilibrium partitioning, pore models for neutral solute rejection, effects of membrane charge, confinement issues and effects on physical properties, pore size distributions, case studies Reverse Osmosis: what is osmosis, introduction to reverse osmosis, the solution diffusion mechanism of transport, case studies Optimisation: membrane characterisation - methods and equipment, process stream characterisation - methods and equipment, rapid process feasibility studies, experimental requirements, process improvements, pre-treatments, case This website stores data such as studiesto enable essential site cookies Intended Learning functionality, as well as Outcomes: marketing, After completing this module students should be able to: personalization, You between the different liquid phase pressure driven membrane separation processes; Clearly defineand andanalytics. differentiate may change your anymechanisms time Understand andsettings describeatthe of separation for each of the different processes; Describe the different ormembrane accept the modules default settings. available and provide examples of `best use'; Understand membrane morphology and resulting hydraulic resistance leading to low, medium and high pressure requirements of the different processes; Decide on a strategy for which process (or combination of processes) to implement in order to achieve a particular separation; Privacy Policy Provide a clear description and mathematical formulation of mass transfer effects in the colloidal region; Apply mathematical Marketingdescriptions of the processes for design and optimisation purposes; Design `high level' filtration processes across the spectrum of MF, UF, NF, and RO Personalization Reading List: Coulson and Richardson, Chemical Engineering, Vol. 2, Butterworth-Heinemann.ISBN: 0-7506-4445Analytics 1 Strathmann, Introduction to Membrane Science and Technology, Wiley.ISBN: 978-3-527-32451-4 Save Notes: The Accept All of Engineering has a ZERO TOLERANCE penalty policy for late submission of all College Additional coursework and continuous assessment. No prior knowledge of membranes or membrane systems is required.

 

EGCM40 Pollutant transport by groundwater flows Credits: 10 Session: 2013/14 Semester 2 (Jan - Jun Modular) Module Aims: This module focuses on the physical mechanisms that govern groundwater flow through porous media, the transport of pollutants, and geochemical interactions between solutes and the solid matrix. Pre-requisite Modules: Co-requisite Modules: Incompatible Modules: 16 hours lectures. Format: 4 hours example classes/tutorials. 80 hours directed private study. Lecturer(s): Dr. B Sandnes Assessment: Coursework 1 (25%) Examination 1 (75%) Assessment Description: Coursework: Study of pollutant transport using simulation package. Report worth 25 % of  mark. Individual piece of coursework. Written exam, 75 % of mark, closed book. Failure Redemption: A supplementary examination will form 100% of the module mark. Assessment Feedback: Informal feedback will be provided during lectures and examples classes. Feedback on coursework will be given as written notes and informal feedback. Formal feedback following completion of exam will be provided in line with standard College of Engineering protocols. Module Content: - Introduction: Ground water, the hydrological cycle - Characteristics of the porous medium and fluid - Darcy flow in saturated porous media - Role of diffusion, dispersion and anisotropy in environmental flows - Geochemical interactions - Carbonates and carbon dioxide - Pollutant transport - Numerical modelling of transport - Multiphase flows Intended Learning Outcomes: After completing this module students should be able to: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of how flows in porous media play a fundamental role in a range of environmental and engineered processes. 2. Demonstrate detailed knowledge of how the properties of the fluid and the porous media govern the flow behaviour. 3. Evaluate the transport and fate of environmental pollutants subjected to groundwater flows. 4. Demonstrate knowledge of common geochemical reactions involving solutes carried by environmental flows. 5. Independently implement simulation models to quantify hydrological transport geochemical reactions of pollutants. 6. Critically assess model results and how they relate to real world problems. 7. Present results in scientific report. (1 -website 4 assessed in exam and as coursework, 5 - 7 assessed using coursework) This stores data such and Postma, Geochemistry, groundwater and pollution, CRC Press, 2005.ISBN: 0415364280 Reading List: Appelo cookies to enable essential site functionality, asGroundwater well as marketing, Charbeneau, Hydraulics and Pollutant Transport, Waveland Press, 2000.ISBN: 978-1-57766-479-6 personalization, and analytics. to visiting and exchange students. Additional Notes: AvailableYou may change your settings at any time orThe accept the default settings. has a ZERO TOLERANCE penalty policy for late submission of all College of Engineering a ll coursework and continuous assessment Privacy Policy

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EGDM01 Colloid and Interface Science Credits: 10 Session: 2013/14 Semester 2 (Jan - Jun Modular) Module Aims: Students will gain an in-depth understanding of the properties of colloids and their importance in engineering and medicine. Pre-requisite Modules: Co-requisite Modules: Incompatible Modules: Lectures: 20 hours Format: Example classes: 5 hours Directed Private Study: 75 hours Lecturer(s): Dr. CM Mcfarlane Assessment: Examination 1 (75%) Coursework 1 (10%) Coursework 2 (15%) Assessment Description: Examination: End of year examination accounting for 75% of the total course mark  Coursework: Coursework 1: Tutorial sheet with various numerical problems for 10% of the total course mark. This is an individual piece of coursework. Coursework 2: Critique of a published paper involving i nvolving colloid science topics for 15% of the total course mark. This is an individual piece of coursework. Failure Redemption: A supplementary examination will form 100% of the module mark. Assessment Feedback: Exam feedback will be given via exam results and the exam feedback forms available on the Swansea University intranet. Coursework feedback will be given via coursework marks, individual written comments on the coursework scripts and provision of model answers on the Blackboard website. Module Content: Module content: [lecture hours] Introduction to the nature of the colloidal state [2] Particle size and its determination theory and practice [2] Determination of zeta potential [1] Charge and potential distribution: the electrical double layer [2] Interactions between particles: repulsive and attractive forces, DLVO theory [3] Determination of important properties for colloidal systems; osmotic pressure, solution viscosity, diffusion coefficients [2] Surface tension and wetting [1] Surfactants and detergents [1] Adsorption of gases at surfaces, chemisorption, physisorption, isotherms (Langmuir, Freunlich etc.) [1] Advanced Atomic force microscopy, surface force apparatus, particle sizing, particle charge [1] This website Instrumentation: stores data such as Applications within engineering - pharmaceuticals and proteins [1] cookies to enable essential site Applications functionality, as within well asengineering marketing, - ultrafiltration and nanofiltration, separation of colloids and biocolloids, biofouling personalization, and analytics. You [2] may change your settings at any time Applications within engineering - sources of nanoparticles and their health effects [1] orIntended accept theLearning default settings. Outcomes: Students will understand explicitly the properties of colloids and their importance in engineering and medicine. Students will also gain a working knowledge of instrumentation involved in characterisation of colloidal and nanotechnological systems. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of  Privacy Policy the context of colloid science in medicine and industry. Marketing

Synthesis of concepts involved at nano, micro and bulk scales. Personalization Reading List: R Hunter, Introduction to Modern Colloid Science , Oxford University Press, 1993.ISBN: 0198553862 Analytics

Additional Notes: This module will be supported with blackboard. Save of Engineering Accept All The College has a ZERO TOLERANCE penalty policy for late submission of all a ll coursework and continuous assessment.

 

EGIM16 Communication Skills for Research Engineers Credits: 10 Session: 2013/14 Semester 1 (Sep-Jan Modular) Module Aims: Communication at a research level differs from that at the undergraduate level in that it is usually driven by an output or result rather than the requirement to show knowledge or understanding. The skill of a good communicator at research level lies in efficiently and rigorously conveying the ideas behind the theory and proof of  the research output. Verbal, written, visual and group communication will be explored tthrough hrough a series of lectures and formative exercises. Pre-requisite Modules: Co-requisite Modules: Incompatible Modules: Lectures (10h), Exercises (20h), Reading / Private Study (30h), Preparation for Assessment (40h) Format: Lecturer(s): Dr. TN Croft Assessment: Assignment 1 (10%) Assignment 2 (10%) Oral Examination (40%) Writing (40%) Assessment Description: The first sit assessment will consist of 4 assignments. The first component will feature a small number (one to three) of tasks which are aimed to evaluate the student's understanding of the other ideas, beyond the written word and oral presentations, which are covered in the module. This will include the critical review of a written output. Other possible tasks include group meetings and the creation of a poster. The coursework may be done individually or in groups, this will be confirmed at the time of setting the work. The second assessment component will be a short written piece, up to two pages long, which will test the students understanding of the concepts with respect to the written work and to allow feedback to the participants in the module prior to the final assessment. This is an individual piece of coursework. The oral examination will involve the students presenting an example of the work they have undertaken in the past, typically a project, through an oral presentation. The target duration of the oral presentation will usually be between 8 to 10 minutes. The exact duration will be specified in the assignment descriptor. This is an individual piece of  coursework. The final, fourth, component will require the student to write a paper or equivalent. This paper will be between six to eight pages in length and will be written to a format described in the assignment descriptor. This is an individual piece of coursework. The reassessment will consist of 2 assignments, details of which are provided in a later section.

This website stores data such as Failure Candidates shall be given one opportunity to redeem a failure in the module during the summer cookies to Redemption: enable essential site functionality, as well as marketing, supplementary period. personalization, and analytics. You may your settings at any of time Thechange reassessment will consist 2 assignments or accept the default settings.

The two components which comprise the resit will be equivalent to the oral and second written assignment of the first sit. The difference will be that the presentation duration will be between 10 to 15 minutes and the written work will be Privacy Policy at least eight pages long. Both of these components are individual pieces of coursework. Assessment Feedback: Blackboard will be used to provide individual feedback to the students on all the components Marketing that contribute to the final mark. For the first assessment component a class feedback document is also generally Personalization included on Blackboard. Analytics

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Module Content: Written Communication: [6 hours] • The usual layout of reports, theses, journal & conference papers. • How to write a good abstract for a research output. • What should be in the introduction? • Contents of the main body of a research output. • Effective conclusions • Writing style • Cross-referencing, captions, references • Critical review of self and others • Design concepts for research posters Oral Communication: [6 hours] • The usual layout of a research presentation • Slide design for a research presentation • Delivery of a presentation, do's and don'ts • Maintaining the audience’s interest. Other topics: [3 hours] • Attending & chairing meetings • Conferences – submissions and attendance • Submission of papers and peer review. Intended Learning Outcomes: By the end of this module the student will be able to: • Write a paper or equivalent employing the structure and rigour required at research level (assessed by both the written assignments) • Efficiently communicate the concepts associated with complex ideas (assessed by the first written assignment and the oral presentation) • Critically evaluate a written output (assessed within the first assessment component) • Verbally present a complex idea using the presentation structure, slide content and delivery techniques expected of a research engineer (assessed through the oral presentation) • Demonstrate an awareness of the other modes of communication of ideas at a research level such as posters and group discussions (assessed in the first assessment component) Reading List: Additional Notes: All lectures and course material will be provided on Blackboard. The College of Engineering has a ZERO TOLERANCE penalty policy for late submission of all a ll coursework and continuous assessment

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EGNM04 Nanoscale Structures and Devices Credits: 10 Session: 2013/14 Semester 2 (Jan - Jun Modular) Module Aims: To provide the student with an understanding of the basic quantum mechanics and techniques required to model the properties of particles and materials on the nano-meter scale. Pre-requisite Modules: Co-requisite Modules: Incompatible Modules: Lectures: 20 hours; Laboratory/Examples classes/tutorials: 10 hours; Directed private study: 60 hours Format: Lecturer(s): Mr. TGG Maffeis, Dr. L Li, Dr. KS Teng Assessment: Examination 1 (65%) Report (20%) Presentation (15%) Assessment Description: 2 hour Exam: Answer 3 questions out of 4; 25 marks each Lab report: written in the form of a publication Presentation: 10min + 5min of questions based on a selected publication Failure Redemption: If rules allow - standard University provisions with marks capped. Assessment Feedback: Feedback provided on the feedback form Module Content: • Micro and Nano-electronics - Top-down technology examining scaling issues, lithography and beyond. Real devices: transistors and others. Next generation devices. • Bottom-up Technology - Atomic manipulation and Quantum Corrals. Growth techniques for nanostructures. Nanolithography and next generation devices. • Nanoscale Structures - Nanowires, Quantum Dots, Bucky balls and Carbon Nanotubes: their physical and electronic properties, fabrication and applications. • Micro and Nanoelectromechanical devices (MEMS and NEMS) - Physics on the micro and nanoscale. Real devices: Motors, gears and ratchets, Casimir force, biomolecular motors, nanosprings and nanobalances. Intended Learning Outcomes: After completing this module you should be able to demonstrate: • the properties, fabrication and applications of nanostructures • the top-down and bottom-up approaches for the fabrication of nanostructures, their advantages, applications and limitations • physics on the micro and nanoscale and implications for real and next-generation devices; MEMS and NEMS have an ability to (thinking skills): • understand how the physical and electronic properties change with dimension and how this affects devices • analyse critically review This websiteand stores data such as information resources (journals, internet, talks, etc.) cookies to enable essential site functionality, as well as marketing, have an ability to (practical skills): personalization, and analytics. • plan, conduct, analyse and You document experiments with minimum help may change your settings at any • use analytical instruments fortime the characterisation of nanostructures or accept the default settings.

have an ability to (key skills): • research and present a chosen topic professionally Privacy Policy • evaluate specific experimental results or research papers and place them in a wider context Marketing Reading List: C P Poole Jr. & F J Owens, Introduction to Nanotechnology, Wiley, 2003. M DiVentra, S Evoy & J R Heflin (Eds.), Introduction to Nanoscale Science and Technology, Springer, 2004. Personalization G Timp (Ed.), Nanotechnology, Springer-Verlag, 1999. Analytics

R Kelsall et al, Nanoscale Science and Technology, Wiley, 2005. K Barnham & D Vvedensky, Low-dimensional Semiconductor Structures, Cambridge University Press, 2001. Save Low-dimensional Accept All M J Kelly, Semiconductors, Oxford University Press, 1995. P J F Harris, Carbon Nanotubes and Related Structures, Cambridge University Press, 1999.

 

Additional Notes: • Failure to sit an examination or submit work by the specified date will result in a mark of 0% being recorded. • Practical work: Growth of nanowires; Nanostructures studied by SEM • All lectures and Course Material will be provided on Blackboard.

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EGNM07 Principles of Nanomedicine Credits: 10 Session: 2013/14 Semester 2 (Jan - Jun Modular) Module Aims: This module will cover the broad range of subjects which encompass the discipline nanomedicine. Building on the foundation of a knowledge of nanotechnology this module will focus on medical applications including biological markers, diagnostics, therapeutics and drug delivery vehicles. Pre-requisite Modules: Co-requisite Modules: Incompatible Modules: 20 hours of formal lecturing. 40 hours private study/reading and 40 hours preparation for assessment Format: Lecturer(s): Professor HD Summers Assessment: Examination (80%) Assignment 1 (20%) Assessment Description: There is 1 assignment: • A problem sheet based on the fundamentals of nanoscale science as applied to biological systems and a data analysis excercise. All coursework will be done individually Failure Redemption: If rules allow - standard University provisions with marks capped. Any re-examination of this module will be by written examination only (100%). Assessment Feedback: Individual feedback on each piece of assessed work via blackboard Module Content: • Interactions on the nanoscale: biological, physical, chemical and optical interactions • Nanoparticles: optical markers, magnetic markers - dots, tubes, wires etc. • Drug delivery strategies: drug delivery systems, pharmacology of nanovectors • Imaging techniques: Microscopy, Flow cytometry • Therapeutics: thermal, optical, microwave Intended Learning Outcomes: • An understanding of the physics at the nanoscale together with an appreciation of the relevant biology of the system studied. • How to design and fabricate a nanoparticle marker. • An understanding of nanoscale imaging techniques and their limitations. • An appreciation of how a nanoparticle can be used as a drug delivery vehicle. • A knowledge of medical practices, diagnosis and treatment • Study independently; use library resources; note taking; time management Reading List: V Wiwanitkit, Advanced Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology, Nova Science Publishers, 2008.ISBN: 1604564350 Additional Notes: • AVAILABLE TO Visiting and Exchange Students. The module has no pre-requisites. This website stores data such as cookies to enable essential site functionality, as well as marketing, personalization, and analytics. You may change your settings at any time or accept the default settings.

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EGTM79 Environmental Analysis and Legislation Credits: 10 Session: 2013/14 Semester 1 (Sep-Jan Modular) Module Aims: This module presents the principles of life cycle analysis and its application to the engineering industry. It covers the assessment of energy conservation by optimal use of resources, including consideration of  primary extraction processes, design/manufacturing/fabrication, improving product life, lightweighting and end of life usage. It also reviews the current and planned European legislation that is of relevance to materials recycling, and considers its implementation in the UK. Pre-requisite Modules: Co-requisite Modules: Incompatible Modules: Lectures 25 Format: Directed private study 35 Preparation of assignments 40 Lecturer(s): Dr. JC Arnold Assessment: Assignment 1 (50%) Assignment 2 (50%) Assessment Description: Assignment 1 - a 2500 word report based around information gathering, review and collation. Assignment 2 - a numerical analysis of an LCA Case Study, coupled with a written report on interpretation of the findings. The quality of the written English is not assessed in either assignment. Failure Redemption: Submission of additional assignment. Assessment Feedback: Each student will receive the mark and individual feedback comments on each piece of  submitted coursework, via the Blackboard site. Module Content: The concept of lifecycle analysis and its application to the materials industry. Principle of energy and resource conservation from 'cradle to grave'. A review of the methodology of LCA, including inventory analysis, data sources and environmental impact i mpact assessment. Case studies from various sectors of engineering and waste management will be covered. The current environmental legislative framework, especially as it relates to recycling activities, including UN, EU and UK legislation. The importance of economic issues on recycling activity. The effects of social and political pressures on recycling activities. Intended Learning Outcomes: An understanding of the principles of life cycle analysis and the different approaches that have been used. An appreciation of the application of LCA to the materials and recycling industries. Familiarity of the significant legislation relevant to recycling. An understanding of the effects of legislation on the economics of recycling and the markets for recycled materials. Recognition of the need to evaluate 'cradle to grave' impact of products in terms of resource and energy conservation and environmental impact. This storesof data as An website appreciation thesuch complexity of legislative, social and political pressures on tehcnological development. cookies to enable essential site Reading List: D.F. Ciambrone, Environmental Life Cycle Analysis, Lewis. functionality, as marketing, P. Frankl &asF.well Rubik, Life Cycle Assessment in Industry and Business, Springer. personalization, and analytics. You Additional Notes: Available to visiting and exchange students. may change your settings at any time or accept the default settings.

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EGTM89 Polymers: Properties and Design Credits: 10 Session: 2013/14 Semester 2 (Jan - Jun Modular) Module Aims: To instill an understanding of design methods with polymeric materials, dealing especially with viscoelastic behaviour. Pre-requisite Modules: Co-requisite Modules: Incompatible Modules: Lectures 20 hours Format: Directed private study 50 hours Preparation for assessment 30 hours Lecturer(s): Dr. DH Isaac Assessment: Examination 1 (75%) Assignment 1 (25%) Assessment Description: Written Assignment (25%) to be submitted in May 2 hour unseen written examination (75%) in May/June Failure Redemption: Supplementary examination. Assessment Feedback: Standard Feedback Forms wil be completed and made available to students Individual feedback on Assignment given at tutorial. Module Content: - General properties of polymers; viscoelasticity, time and temperature dependence, creep, recovery and stress relaxation. - Design using deformation data; creep curves, pseudo-elastic design methodology, time and temperature dependant modulus, limiting strain. - Mathematical modelling of viscoelasticity; equations for creep, recovery, relaxation, Maxwell and Voigt models, 4element model, standard linear model. - Boltzmann superposition principle and its use with complex stress histories. - Strength and fracture of polymers; energy approach, toughness, ductile / brittle transitions, yield strength, ductility factor. - Creep failure of plastics; fracture mechanics approach, fatigue failure, effects of cycle frequency, waveform, fracture mechanics approach to fatigue Intended Learning Outcomes: After completing this module you should be able to demonstrate: A thorough knowledge of mechanical design considerations with polymer-based materials. A knowledge of mathematical models for viscoelasticity and complex stress histories. A knowledge of failure modes in polymers. The application of mathematical models to mechanical behaviour of materials. How to interpret and use design data for polymer-based materials How to undertake materials design with polymers to t o avoid failure. The application of mathematical skills in real engineering applications. The application of fundamental materials knowledge across different materials classes. Reading List: A W Birley, B Haworth and J Batchelor, (R) Physics of Plastics, Hanser.ISBN: 0195207823 R J Crawford, (R) Plastics Engineering, Pergamon Press.ISBN: 9780750637640 and 9780080524108 (e-book) This website stores data such as ZERO TOLERANCE FOR LATE SUBMISSION PENALTY: Additional Notes: cookies to enable essential site functionality, as well as marketing, Available to visiting and exchange students. personalization, and analytics. You may change your settings at any time orAdditional accept the notes: defaultDetailed settings. course notes provided.

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