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Evaluating the Effects of E-readers in Libraries in Kenya

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Evaluating the Effects of E-readers in Libraries in Kenya

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Content

Project
L E A P
Libraries

E-Reading

Activities

Partnership

Evaluating the Effects of E-readers in
Libraries in Kenya.

Final Report
April 2015

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

1

This report is based on research funded in part by the Bill & Melinda Gates
Foundation. The findings and conclusions contained within are those of the
authors and do not necessarily reflect positions or policies of the funders.

Table
of Contents
Foreword …3
Executive Summary ...4
Introduction ...7
Background ...7
The Kenyan context ...8
Project description ...9
Pilot libraries…10
Research design…11
Limitations…12

Results & lessons learned…13
Relevant content…13
Appropriate technology…15
Low e-reader breakage and loss rates…16
Device challenges…16
Library patronage…17
Patron demographic shifts…18
E-reader trainings…20
E-reading outreach…20
Librarian habits & attitudes…22
Patron habits & attitudes…23

Cost effectiveness…23
Operational learnings: policies and procedures…26
Borrowing…26
Time management…26
Record-keeping…26
Device charging and the solar pilot…27

Recommendations…28
Librarians…28
Implementing organizations…30
Policymakers…31

Opportunities for further research…32
Conclusions ...33
Acknowledgements …34
Works Cited ...35
Appendices ...37

Foreword
Dear Reader,
Kenya National Library Service (knls) was established in 1965
by an Act of Parliament to promote, establish, equip, manage,
maintain and develop libraries in Kenya. Since then, the role of
libraries in society has changed radically all over the world, and
Kenya has been no exception. Last year knls collaborated with
Worldreader to launch an exciting new initiative called Project
Libraries, E-Reading, Activities and Partnership (Project LEAP) in
Western Kenya. In a knowledge economy, libraries play a key role
as drivers of the widespread dissemination and consumption of
knowledge. Project LEAP has indeed helped participating libraries
take a big LEAP forward into the knowledge economy.
Through the use of portable devices like e-readers, which consume
little power and can hold thousands of books, Project LEAP brought
library services beyond the physical walls of the library, increased the
number of visitors to the library threefold, and fostered not just basic
literacy, but also technological literacy, helping the people of Kenya
participate fully in the nation’s development.
We at knls have embarked upon a number of partnerships to
increase access to Information Communications Technology (ICT)
in its libraries. However, Project LEAP is the first ICT project that
has successfully incorporated a wide variety of Kenyan, African,
and international books, that has been rigorously evaluated for
effectiveness, and has widened knls’ access and brought libraries
to the center of communities.
In accordance with the knls 5-year strategic plan for 2012 - 2017
and with the vision of becoming the hub for information and
knowledge for empowerment, we look forward to continuing our
partnership with Worldreader in order to bring digital reading into
every public library in Kenya. The rapid nationwide scale-up of
Project LEAP will serve to further improve the reading culture in
Kenya and enhance availability of materials, ultimately positioning
libraries as major contributors to Kenya’s development, as defined
in Vision 2030 and in the 2010 Constitution of Kenya.

Richard Atuti
Director, Kenya National Library Service

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

4

Executive
Summary

Project at a glance

LOCATION

Western Kenya
PROJECT SITES

8 libraries

(4 public & 4 community)
NUMBER OF E-READERS

200

(25 per library)
TOTAL BOOKS DISTRIBUTED

44,000

(225 per e-reader)
DURATION OF PROJECT

March – December 2014

Project LEAP— “Libraries, E-reading,
Activities and Partnership” – was a groundbreaking pilot program implemented by
Worldreader in partnership with eight
public and community libraries in Western
Kenya, and funded by the Bill & Melinda
Gates Foundation. The LEAP pilot aimed to
increase the availability of reading materials
in Kenya’s libraries with the provision of
e-readers filled with relevant books.
The one-year pilot tested the use, function
and adoption of e-readers in selected
libraries to determine how e-readers affect
library patronage, communities, staff,
policies and procedures. Ultimately, these
learnings will serve to inform the expansion
of digital reading programs in libraries
across Kenya and sub-Saharan Africa.
200 e-readers were deployed to the eight
public libraries (25 each), preloaded with
100 African and 100 international book
titles for a total of 40,000 books initially
distributed. Additionally, in September
each library selected 25 titles to upload,
for a final total of 44,000 books (about half
coming from African publishers and another
half from US and European publishers). For
children, the titles primarily include storybooks and some school curriculum, and for
adults, pleasure reading and informational
books. Overnight borrowing of e-readers
was allowed selectively at the individual
libraries’ discretion, however e-readers
were used mainly in official outreach and
training activities, and by individual patrons
within the walls of the libraries.
This paper constitutes a final report for the
yearlong LEAP pilot. The primary impacts
of the program included an almost
threefold increase in library visits, from
10,442 to 29,023 patrons per month, 254
library-initiated community events, and
Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

5

over 20,000 patrons trained on e-reader
usage.

Impact

2.78x

the number of monthly library
visits

20,000+
patrons reached through
e-reader training

254

library-initiated community
events held

Additionally, both patrons and librarians
reported frequent use of the e-readers and
positive feelings towards the e-readers,
with 90% of patrons surveyed reporting
that they found the e-readers easy to use
or very easy to use, and 86% reporting
that they had recommended the e-reader
to family and friends. The LEAP e-readers
also showed a low breakage and loss
rate of just 2.5%. Notably, 84% of patrons
surveyed reported reading more since the
e-reader program began.
The findings presented in this report show
that digital reading programs may help
libraries increase overall patronage and
patron interest in the library, attract a wider
age range of patrons, and increase the
amount patrons are reading, in addition
to rapidly expanding the collections of
libraries to suit patron needs.
Moreover, the results show e-readers are
cost-effective: conservative estimates
suggest that e-reader programs cost
between $8-$15 per person impacted
over a three-year period.
The program, however, was not without
its challenges, including the heavy
workload associated with managing
the program, additional electricity costs
for e-reader charging, and developing
policies and procedures that work for
diverse library settings.

84%

This report poses recommendations to
address these challenges and maximize
the impact of future library-based digital
reading programs. These recommendations are tailored to specific audiences,
including librarians, implementing organizations and policymakers. However

…at a cost of $8-$15 per
person impacted

three over-arching keys to program
success emerge from the report. These
are: 1) Dedicated staff at each library
for managing the program; 2) Relevant
content on the e-readers; 3) Frequent

of patrons reported
reading more.

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

6

community outreach to raise awareness of the library.
By bridging the traditional role of the library as a place for
reading and books with the increasing presence of technology,
the findings presented in this report indicate that digital reading
programs may be a good first step for libraries just beginning to
implement technology programs. They are relatively low cost,
easy to set up, easy to train on, and allow libraries room to get
their feet wet before implementing more cost and time intensive
technology interventions.
In short, these findings show that digital reading programs have
significant potential when it comes to helping African libraries
meet the needs of a 21st century patron base.

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

7

Introduction
Background
In much of Africa, access to books and information is extremely
limited– UNESCO reports that 50% of schools in Africa have few
or no books at all.1 Furthermore, according to UNESCO, “Africa
produces a mere 2% of the world’s books, despite having 12%
of the world’s population. It is estimated that sub-Saharan Africa
imports close to 70% of its books. The majority are university
textbooks and vocational training books and cost an average of
US$25 per copy.”2 Transportation, logistics, and financial constraints contribute to this dearth of paper books and other written
materials on the African continent and in developing countries.
Africa’s libraries play a critical role in addressing this shortage by
serving as repositories of books open to all. And yet, libraries are
so much more than collections of books. UNESCO states that
they are key to “finding, using and interpreting appropriate information that opens up opportunities for lifelong learning, literacy enhancement, informed citizenship, recreation, creative imagination,
individual research, critical thinking, and ultimately, empowerment
in an increasingly complex world.”3
Libraries must continue to expand their roles in their local communities in order to thrive. As a recent report from the Aspen Institute
put so well, “as more information moves to digital formats, public
libraries will hold less material locally in their physical collections
(…) The physical library must undergo a transition that embraces
the openness and flexibility needed to thrive in a world of constant
change.”4
Sub-Saharan Africa’s libraries are no exception to this trend as
the region undergoes rapid change, particularly on the technological front. For example, Africa experienced the fastest growth
in internet access and mobile phone penetration over recent
years, with a 2000-2014 internet penetration growth rate of nearly
6,500%. For the sake of comparison, the next fastest growth rate
is held by Asia, at over 1,100%.5

1

SAQMEQ III (2011).

2

Makotsi, Ruth (2004), cited in Krolak, L (2005).

3

Krolak (2005).

4

Aspen Institute (2014).

5

Internet World Stats, Accessed on February 11, 2015.

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

8

Digital reading programs can make the most of the expansion of
technology on the African continent and at the same time, help
extend and expand the role of local libraries to fit the 21st century.
By making a wide array of books available at the click of a button
and increasing the portability of books, e-readers and mobile
reading programs harness the power of technology to bring the
riches of libraries to the communities they serve.

The Kenyan Context
There are 58 public libraries in Kenya, managed by the Kenya
National Library Service (knls). A smaller network of community
and independent libraries exist, which are run by foundations,
NGOs and schools. Many of these are supported by knls libraries,
which lend out books to more rural facilities.
An average public library in Kenya (which is generally better-resourced than a community library) has around 5,000 books in its
collection. While knls has reported an upward trend in number of
books purchased over the past decade, the number of new books
acquired has been only one book per registered member per year.7
Common challenges faced by libraries across sub-Saharan Africa
include: “poor infrastructure, low levels of digital resource access,
lack of funding and the absence of professional development,
and training to re-skill public librarians for the 21st century.”8 In
Kenya specifically, knls stated the following concerns regarding its
technological capacity in its 2013-2017 Strategic Plan (knls (n.d.),
“Strategic Plan 2013 – 2017”:
•• Obsolescence due to rapidly changing technologies
•• Increased demand for automation and virtual access
•• Increased shift towards e-commerce and telecommunication
technologies
•• Increasing need to build, preserve and provide digital content 9

6

Kinya, (2011).

7

Kinya, Ibid.

8

African Public Libraries Summit (n.d).

9

knls (n.d.)

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

9

Worldreader developed LEAP, which stands for “Libraries,
e-Reading, Activities and Partnership,” in response to these
challenges, believing that e-reader programs have the potential
to effectively address both technological concerns and the need
for expanded and more diverse library collections. LEAP builds
upon Worldreader’s successes addressing the shortage of books
in school settings throughout sub-Saharan Africa, and attempts to
modify this model to fit the diverse library setting.

Project Description

Worldreader is a global
non-profit that uses
technology to bring
digital books to every
child and her family,
so they can improve
their lives. Worldreader
reaches over 185,000
readers in 50 countries
every month through
e-readers and mobile
phones, with a digital
library of 15,000 local
and international e-books
in 44 languages

Project LEAP was a groundbreaking pilot program implemented
by Worldreader in partnership with eight public and community
libraries in Western Kenya, and funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates
Foundation. The project, which was implemented in libraries from
March through December 2014 (9 months), aimed to expand
the availability of relevant content through these libraries with the
provision of e-readers filled with hundreds of relevant books each.
The project tested the use, functionality and adoption of e-readers
in the pilot libraries in an effort to investigate the scalability of library-based digital reading programs across Kenya and sub-Saharan Africa. Getting library patrons reading more was a primary goal
of the project because of the clear link between time spent reading
and the development of literacy skills, and the subsequent positive
impacts of these literacy skills on poverty, health, gender equality
and social mobility.
In early 2014 Worldreader deployed 200 e-readers—each
preloaded with 200 digital book titles—to the pilot libraries. 4,000
additional books were pushed to the e-readers in September 2014
based on requests from individual libraries, so that by the end of
the project 44,000 books were deployed in total.
At the start of the program LEAP project managers were trained on
e-reader operation, project management, and monitoring and evaluation, and organized community sensitization and training events
in their libraries. Worldreader convened quarterly librarian meetings
to encourage knowledge exchange and networking between staff
at the pilot libraries, and to address issues as they arose.
The project also included ongoing monitoring and research in
order to understand the impacts of e-readers on library patronage,
library infrastructure, and librarian habits, attitudes and practices.
Monitoring efforts included a focus on operational learnings with
applicability for scaling the program beyond the pilot sites.

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

10

Pilot Libraries
Table 1 outlines the final set of pilot libraries, their geographic
settings and their affiliations. Libraries were asked to participate
after a thorough selection process, the details of which and can be
found in the appendix of the report.
Diversity and size of library collections, and the need for more
technology programs were key concerns for both librarians and
patrons prior to the commencement of the e-reader program.
The collections of project libraries before Project LEAP ranged
from 900 books (serving an average of 200 users monthly) to
50,000 books (serving an average of 100,000 users monthly).
In terms of technology at the pilot libraries, five out of eight had
at least one functioning computer, and three of the eight libraries
had internet access. Those librarians who had access to function-

TABLE 1
Libraries by Location and Affiliation
LIBRARY

LOCATION
Urban

AFFILIATION

Rural

Public

Busia Public Library

X

JF Omange Community Library

X

Kakamega Area Library

X

X

Kisumu Public Library

X

X

X

X

SAIDE Community Library

X

Shikalakala Library

X

Siaya Community Library

X
4

Reference 10

X

Nyilima Community Library

Total

Independent

4

X
X
X
X
4

3

1

Reference libraries are school libraries that are open to the public outside of school hours. During initial project selection
Worldreader learned these libraries were a vital part of the library ecosystem, particularly in more rural communities. As such,
wanted to include at least one of these libraries in the pilot.

10

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

11

ing computers reported regularly using them for record keeping
and other administrative tasks. However there was less access to
computers for patrons; only three libraries (all in urban communities) used technology in patron programs. These three libraries’
programs included computer classes, video presentations, and
assistance with computer-based research.

Research Design
The LEAP pilot aimed to answer the following research questions:
•• How can e-readers be effectively utilized in the library
environment?
•• What are the operational challenges of library e-reading
programs?
•• To what extent are devices used in library e-reader programs?
•• What impacts could digital books have on library users?

This report outlines answers to these and other questions, building
off of LEAP’s baseline and midterm reports, which can be found
on Worldreader’s website at http://www.worldreader.org/learnings.
This report also aims to capture qualitative and quantitative
impacts of the program and operational learnings.
These findings were collected primarily through self-reported data
from the pilot library project managers. Data were collected via:
•• Patron surveys (n=126)
•• Library staff surveys (baseline and endline) (n= 14)
•• Monthly project monitoring reports (one per month, per library)
•• Site visit observations by Worldreader staff
•• Quarterly librarian meetings

All monitoring tools can be found in the appendices of this
report. November was the last full month where data was
collected, as most libraries close for part of December for the
Christmas holidays.
The conclusions drawn from the data will further inform recommendations for e-reading and digital reading programs throughout
sub-Saharan African libraries, as outlined in the Recommendations
section of this report.

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

12

Limitations
Most of the data were collected through self-reporting mechanisms, and as such are subject to inherent biases. These data
should be placed within the larger context of the report rather than
stand on their own, and will be triangulated with additional sources
of data and feedback where applicable.
Where exact records were difficult to collect, librarians were asked
to estimate. Additionally, some libraries did not complete regular
monthly reporting, and where incomplete data had significant
effects on the data set, these records were eliminated. Such
instances will be called out in the narrative of the report.
In the case of the patron surveys, it’s important to note that the
endline sample size was larger than the baseline (n =125 vs. n = 38).
While this means the endline sample was more representative of
the overall patron population, considering that the patron population grew over the course of the pilot this should not present major
methodological issues.
To protect the anonymity of the individual libraries, data from
project sites will generally be presented in groups and sub-groups,
except where individual case studies and examples are relevant.

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

13

Results & Lessons Learned
The following sections present the main findings from nine months of project implementation, along with lessons learned around these findings. They serve as the basis for the
subsequent Recommendations section.

Relevant content
A key factor in the success of Project LEAP was that the e-readers provided a wealth of
relevant content that excited patrons. At the time of the baseline survey, 26% of patrons
surveyed requested more content or more varied content, and five of eight LEAP project
managers reported that increasing the variety of books available at their libraries was a
primary motivation for applying for the e-reader program. Table 2 shows the initial collection size along with additional content requested by librarians at the time of the baseline.

TABLE 2
Baseline Library Collections and Librarian Content Requests11
LIBRARY NAME

COLLECTION SIZE

CONTENT WANTED

N/A

Textbooks, teachers guides and study aids

8,000

Textbooks, teachers guides and study aids

Kakamega Area Library

31,448

Fiction/ Literary works, Textbooks, teachers guides
and study aids

Kisumu Public Library

50,000

Fiction/ Literary works, Textbooks, teachers guides
and study aids

Nyilima Community Library

24,000

Fiction/ Literary Works

900

Textbooks, teachers guides and study aids

4,500

Textbooks, teachers guides and study aids, Literary
works/ fiction, Reference

Busia Community Library
JF Omange Community Library

SAIDE Community Library
Shikalakala Primary School Library

This information was not collected from Siaya Community Library, which served as a replacement library for an initially
selected library that did not meet program requirements after two months into project implementation.

11

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

14

TABLE 3
Books by publisher location, language & genre
PUBLISHER
AFRICAN

51%

Kenya

32%

Ghana

7%

Nigeria

1%

South Africa

10%

Tanzania

1%

INTERNATIONAL

49%

Australia

3%

US

36%

UK

7%

Poland

0%

Canada

2%

France

1%

Spain

<1%

LANGUAGE
English

90%

Swahili

9%

GENRE
Literary Works
Textbooks & Teacher
Guides
Reference

75%
16%
6%

LEAP libraries were provisioned with 25
e-readers, each initially containing 200
books for a total of 5,000 additional books
per library. Books were selected from
Worldreader’s content library in collaboration with LEAP librarians to ensure the
relevance of the content provided.
4,000 additional books (20 titles per
library) were added to the e-reader in
September, with the choice of these titles
being left to the project managers, based
on patron requests. In addition, patrons
were able to download other free content
at their discretion.12 Thus, by the time the
pilot concluded, each e-reader contained
at least 225 titles. This resulted in a significant increase in the libraries’ collection
size, considering that the median collection size prior to Project LEAP was 8,000.
Roughly half of the titles came from
African publishers and the half from North
America and Europe. See Table 3 for a
breakdown of e-reader content. The full
LEAP book list can be found in Appendices of this report.
Worldreader works diligently to curate its
content library to the needs of people in
the developing world, and Africa in particular. All library book selection was done
in collaboration with the project managers
to ensure the most relevant content
was selected.
This relevancy has been identified by
Project Managers as one of the main
reasons patrons were drawn to the
e-readers. Increased use of digital books
in the library (as reported in later sections)
is at least partially due to the age-appropriate and culturally relevant content on
the e-readers.

Because this was done on an ad hoc basis, no exact data on patron downloads is available, however based on librarian
review of the e-readers the overall impact on the books available to patrons appears to be negligible).

12

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

15

TABLE 4
Additional Materials Requested by Patrons
Science and biology
Biographies
Psychology
Specific textbooks and revision materials
(physics, geography)
Drawing and design topics
Music and art books
Novels
Journals
Accounting books
Hotel management and hospitality
Criminology
Philosophy
Bible commentaries
Journalism books

Busia Community Library, for example, has
offered e-readers to patrons in the past.
However, the content on these devices
was not appealing to enough of the
library’s patrons and as such, the devices
went largely unused. Patrons who utilized
the e-readers made sure to specify that
they wanted the “new” e-readers when
borrowing them, specifically because of
the featured content. Content, indeed,
drove patron adoption.
83.3% of patrons surveyed at the conclusion of the pilot reported that they found
the content they were looking for on the
e-readers. For those users who did not
find what they were looking for, the top
books requested were curricular or vocational. See Table 4 for additional books
requested by patrons.
In terms of downloading new content,
patrons at all libraries were encouraged
to ask the librarians for permission to
download books; however no written
policies exist at any of the libraries.
Occasionally, inappropriate content was
downloaded onto the e-readers, and the
librarians conducted regular monitoring of the devices, checking for explicit
keywords, in order to address this.

Appropriate technology
When evaluated based on ease of use and
patron satisfaction, e-readers proved to
be appropriate for the context of Project
LEAP. 61% of patrons surveyed at the
conclusion of the pilot reported they found
the e-reader “very easy” to use, 29%
found it “easy” to use, 6% reported it was
“neither easy or hard,” and 2% reported
the device to be difficult to operate.
In terms of patron attitudes towards the
e-readers, 67% of patron survey respondents reported they “strongly liked” using
the e-reader, and another 32% reported
they “liked” using the e-reader. Less than

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

16

one percent of those surveyed reported they “neither liked or disliked” the e-reader and no
respondents reported disliking the e-reader.
Perhaps most telling, 86% of respondents reported recommending the e-reader to a friend
or family member.
Such findings indicate that patrons on the whole find the e-readers easy to use, enjoy
using them, and are recommending them to friends and family. This points to the appropriateness of e-reader technology for library patrons.

Low e-reader breakage and loss rates
Four e-readers (across four of the pilot libraries) were stolen and one was broken over the
course of nine months, for a total breakage and loss rate of 2.5% (five out of 200). This
is indicative of a downward trend across all Worldreader projects, with breakage rates
dropping significantly over the last four years. The breakage rate is also slightly lower than
failure rates for Amazon Kindles overall, as reported by Consumer Reports (which cites a
13
3% failure rate).
This is particularly striking given that LEAP devices are being put into the hands of many
more people than a typical school project. Worldreader attributes this low failure rate to
a newer, more durable Kindle Paperwhite model being used, along with an emphasis on
device handling during training sessions.

Device Challenges
The most common challenge associated with the devices themselves was not having
enough to meet patron demand, particularly when some e-readers were outside of the
library for outreach sessions. This was particularly true for larger libraries that might see
hundreds of patrons in a day.
A second challenge was keeping the devices charged, particularly in rural libraries with
intermittent access to electricity, along with additional costs associated with charging
(particularly when libraries were located in a rural setting). Two LEAP libraries participated
in Worldreader’s brief study designed to identify a solar charging solution for rural schools
and libraries. The results of this and potential for addressing challenges associated with
charging are presented in the Solar Pilot section.
Worldreader conducted trouble shooting with the project managers on site visits and at
quarterly meetings to address to these and other challenges. Additionally, solutions are
proposed in the Recommendations section.

13

Consumer Reports (2013).

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

17

Library Patronage
Technology is an important tool, not only for opening up access
to information, but also for attracting new patrons to the libraries
(particularly youth). Accordingly, all eight pilot libraries reported
increases in monthly library visits (herein referred to as “patronage”)
that far surpassed initial expectations. See Table 5 for a
breakdown of January to November 2014 patron visits by library.
Overall the libraries experienced a 178% increase in library visits
from the time of the baseline (before the program started) to the
final full month of the pilot (November). Put another way, monthly
library visits increased almost three-fold. This increase was
generally steady (for example, a 133% increase was observed from
the first month of implementation until the last) though there were
some spikes and drops in conjunction with the school calendar.14
These numbers do not include patrons attending outreach or
training activities outside of the library, as these will be discussed in
subsequent sections. It should also be noted these are not unique
patrons, as patrons who entered the library more than once were
double counted; many individual patrons visited the library multiple
times in a given month. Counting unique patrons where library
cards and other identification measures are scarce is difficult and

TABLE 5
Monthly Library Patrons
LIBRARY

JANUARY

NOVEMBER

CHANGE

% CHANGE

Public Libraries

8,684

22,815

14,131

162%

Community Libraries

1,758

7,108

5,350

304%

Urban/Peri-Urban

5,788

15,732

9,944

172%

Rural

4,654

14,191

9,537

204%

Total

10,442

29,023

18,581

178%

Data for one public library were removed due to inconsistent reporting. This library showed a high number of monthly
patrons, meaning the numbers presented here may underestimate average growth in patronage. This means data reported
here are not consistent with the baseline and midterm reports as a different methodology was used. Additionally, one library
started the program in May, and as such, June numbers were used for their baseline. In the case of Shikalakala, October data
were used for final reporting, as November data were not available.

14

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

18

resource-intensive.

Responding to increased
demand by expanding
library schedules

Prior to the start of
the e-reader program,
SAIDE Community
Library did not have
enough patron traffic
on weekends to stay
open to the community.
Since the start of the
e-reader program, the
library has been racing to
keep up with increased
demand (from less than
30 patrons in the month
of January to over 500
in June), and has started
opening on weekends.
Siaya Community
Library has also started
holding a reading club
every Saturday morning
using the e-readers,
and Busia Library now
holds teacher e-reader
and computer training
every Friday and student
training all-day Saturday

15

Goethe-Institut, Kenya (2011).

16

UNFPA (2013).

Regardless, the findings presented here indicate that the e-readers
lead to large increases in the number of patrons coming through
the doors of the libraries.
The following factors were identified by project managers as contributing to these changes in membership and patronage:
•• The influx of new, appropriate reading material brought on by
the addition of the e-readers.
•• Excitement about new technology.
•• The increase in outreach programs being conducted in the
communities as a result of Project LEAP, thus “getting the word
out” about the libraries (see Outreach for more information
on this).

Patron demographic shifts
Young people are the most active users of libraries across Kenya.
While an exact age breakdown of registered knls-facility users
was unavailable, the Goethe-Institut found in 2011-2012 62% of
patrons were aged 21-30 years, whereas 4.7 million adults (62%)
and 2.9 million children (38%) were registered as library users.15
At the time of the LEAP baseline, an estimated 84% of patrons
using the library were under the age of 25. This means that
children and youth were overrepresented among LEAP library
users, as 63.5% of Kenya’s population was under the age of 25
in 2009 according to Kenya’s national census.16,17 The tendency
for the library to attract young users held true regardless of library
type, size or location. A common reason for this skewing of demographics is the widespread perception that libraries are more
suited to children than adults.
Young people were also more likely to be “power users” of the
libraries. As the LEAP baseline indicated, those aged 24 and under
were 2.5 times more likely to visit the library at multiple times per
week. While this pointed to an undeniable need to engage young
people in library contexts, it also highlighted the need for outreach
to the adult patron population. Diversifying community using the
library was a secondary priority for LEAP.

Note, this data is different from that reported in the original LEAP baseline report, as one library that was included in that
analysis was replaced. The data points presented here are reflective of the final set of pilot libraries. One large public library was
eliminated from this analysis due to inconsistent reporting.

17

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By the time of the final assessment, the estimated percentage
of patrons under the age of 25 went down from 84% to 75%,
indicating an increase in the number of adult patrons visiting the
library. Put another way, at the baseline, for every ten patrons who
entered the library, 8 were under the age of 24. Now 7 are under
the age of 24, and three are older. This shift happened gradually
over the course of the nine-month pilot.
It’s also important to note that these are estimated numbers.
However, this shift in demographics is consistent with observations by pilot librarians and Worldreader staff. See Table 6 for a
breakdown of patrons by age.18

TABLE 6
Distribution of Patrons by Age Group
0-12

13-18

19-24

25-34

35-44

45-54

55 and above

25%

31%

19%

10%

9%

5%

1%

A number of hypotheses may explain this shift. As mentioned,
Worldreader encouraged library staff to broaden the scope of their
outreach activities to include more adults. Second, even though
much of this outreach was targeted at children many parents and
teachers came to the library to see “what the fuss was about,”
with the new e-reader technology.
The gender balance at the library stayed the same over the course
of the project. At the time of the baseline, librarians estimated 53%
of patrons were female, and this remained unchanged over the
course of the program.19
Additional demographic information on patrons (how far away they
lived from the libraries, means of transport used to arrive at the
libraries, etc) can be found in the appendices of this report.

18

Exact records of patron ages are not kept by most of the pilot libraries. As such, project managers estimate these numbers.

Data on one library was excluded because it was incomplete. In the case of the library that started late, data from the first
month of implementation was used.

19

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E-reader trainings
Librarians reported a total of 691 training sessions – An average
of just under 11 sessions per month per library, or 2.5 per week. A
whopping 21,191 people were reported trained inside and outside
of the library. 56% were women and girls. Most of this training
occurred outside of the library within schools.20
Two of the libraries devised systems by which library staff trained
teachers in neighboring schools, and these teachers managed
the e-readers when they are on school premises. This allowed the
librarians to focus on the trainings, and such decentralization helps
to lessen the workload placed on the project managers.

E-reading outreach
Training and outreach into the communities were the main drivers
behind the large increases in patronage observed over the course
of the program. Because e-readers are more portable than paper
books, this makes them an ideal tool for librarians looking to
go out into their communities to engage students and others
in reading activities. Indeed, many librarians indicated that the
e-readers spent more time outside of the libraries than in them.
Librarians reported leading 254 events in total, or an average of
3.5 events per month, per library. Outreach was most commonly
conducted in schools, as libraries were already conducting school
outreach before the start of the program, and because of the
common perception of libraries being places for children. Schoolbased e-reader training, specifically, is reported in the Training
section, whereas additional community outreach sessions are
reported here.
Many libraries incorporated e-readers into their existing to
programs to improve the effectiveness of these programs. As an
example, Kisumu Public Library incorporated e-readers into its US
Embassy-sponsored American Corner project that aims to bring
ICT initiatives to rural communities by working with local beauty
pageant winners to lead e-reader reading activities in slum communities among diverse groups including adults and children.

The split between people trained inside and outside of the libraries was reported inconsistently and as such, exact numbers
are not available. However, this is confirmed by librarians and Worldreader staff.

20

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Using the additional reading materials provided through
e-readers, LEAP libraries also developed new outreach activities.
Examples include:
•• SAIDE Community Library held popular inter-school debate
competitions utilizing materials from the e-readers,
which involved six schools and was coordinated by volunteering teachers
•• Nyilima and JF Omange initiated book clubs, and Siaya started
a weekend reading club headed by a reputed author who
writes a column in the Saturday Nation newspaper
•• JF Omange had a radio program “Wanafunzi na maktaba”
(“students and libraries:) on a Kenyan local radio station Radio
Sahara that they were featured for 6 weeks every Saturday
•• Busia Library led library sessions in schools, and partnered with
an NGO that conducts outreach activities with e-readers once
a week. The library also pitched a tent as part of a four-day
Agricultural Show to expose the community to e-readers.
•• Busia and Kisumu shared e-readers with six community
libraries in Uganda
•• Kisumu and Kakamega Libraries used e-readers among
special needs communities, such as children who are blind and
hearing impaired
•• Kisumu Library conducted online e-reader training for the Dar
es Salam American Corner program and Nakuru Library

The most common formats for school-based outreach were to
train and/or provide e-reader activities for one class per school
visit, or to organize book clubs of 10-12 students. Other types of
outreach activities included:
•• Reading tents at community events
•• Library marketing and membership campaigns at local events
•• Reading clubs
•• Debates
•• Lectures and book talks
•• Community literacy campaigns
•• Reading competitions
•• Computer/ICT training
•• Health awareness sessions using materials on the e-readers
•• Outreach to local businesses
•• Attending county scouts camp with e-readers

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Anecdotal feedback from outreach activities suggests they are
effective in creating a culture of reading and improved reading
skills. For example, teachers at Shikalakala Primary School
observed gains in literacy, reading comprehension, and grammar.
They shared that e-readers have created a school culture that emphasizes reading, motivating non-readers to work hard to improve
their skills. Teachers encourage strong students to share e-readers
with weaker students so that they can provide help to their peers
who are struggling. Similarly, head teachers from different schools
receiving outreach from Nyilima Community Library say that
students requested visiting the library in the afternoons and during
recess, suggesting a new enthusiasm for reading during free time.

Librarian Habits & Attitudes
In terms of general feelings towards the e-reader, by the end of the
program, 69% of librarians reported that the e-reader was “very
easy” to use, 23% said it was easy and 8% said neither easy nor
hard. 68% reported “strongly liking” the e-reader and 38% “liked”
the e-reader.
54% said they felt “very comfortable” training patrons on the
e-reader, 38% felt comfortable and 8% felt only a little comfortable.
None felt uncomfortable or neutral. 92% of staff surveyed reported
training patrons on the e-readers.
At the time of the baseline, all of the librarians who had access
to technology in their libraries reported using it, however for 75%
this was only for record-keeping purposes and they did not use
technology in patron programs. This shifted significantly by the end
of the program, and 77% of the staff using technology (other than
e-readers) reported doing so for patron programs.
Librarian comfort with technology, along with the increased
interest in technology generated from outreach and training, lead
to the development of new technology programs for patrons. For
example, SAIDE Community Library started free computer training
for teachers in response to increased interest around technology. As another example, JF Omange created a website after the
start of Project LEAP, and started a new project called “ELearning
Global Chat” that facilitates peer learning among pupils through
platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and email. Siaya Library has
made plans to relocate to a new building in order to secure more
space for technology use.
Such evidence again points to the potential for digital reading
programs to serve as a pathway towards increasing technology
usage at libraries.

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23

Patron Habits & Attitudes
46% of the patrons surveyed reported finding out about the library through librarian staff,
again indicating the benefit of librarians being out in their communities more through
outreach activities. The second-most common way for patrons to find out about the
libraries was through a friend or another patron, with 18% of patrons reporting finding out
about the e-reader program this way.
At the baseline, the majority of the patrons surveyed were “power users”, with 71%
coming into the library more than once per week. That percentage dropped slightly to 57%
at the endline. While it does appear patrons are using the library less frequently this could
also show that a greater variety of people with different habits and visit patterns are now
using the e-readers, as opposed to only those who are already frequenting the library.
The percentage of patrons reporting attending events at the library in the last 12 months
increased from 42% at the baseline to 52% at the final survey. Such data indicate that
more patrons are attending events, and that more events are being held since the start of
the e-reader program.
Finally, 84% of patrons surveyed reported reading more since the e-readers were introduced to their libraries. Considering that this was a primary goal of the program, it is
exciting to see such positive results.
Additional data on patron demographics, attitudes and habits can be found in the appendices of this report.

Cost Effectiveness
The impacts presented above, combined with the diminishing costs of technology, indicate
that e-readers are a sustainable, cost-effective mechanism for increasing the reach and
impact of libraries in Africa. As a standalone project, Worldreader currently makes available
its BLUEBox (Building Literacy Using E-Readers) for Libraries package for $6,500. This
package includes 35 e-readers each with 200 books, a mobile phone with Worldreader Mobile pre-installed, an e-reader carrying case, training materials and Worldreader
technical support. A library could launch a digital reading project with this package within a
few months’ time.21
When these direct costs are combined with additional costs to the libraries, including
Project Manager salary, travel expenses for outreach, building a charging station and more,

For more information, see: http://www.worldreader.org/involved/bring-ereaders-to-school/ Note, these costs do not include a
Worldreader trainer at project launch.

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this comes out to less than $15 per person impacted (over 3 years
of project implementation). See Table 7 for a summary of these
costs. A detailed breakdown of these costs can be found in the
appendices of the report. It should be noted that these figures
represent averages and estimations based on current project data,
and are subject to fluctuation and change.
It should be noted that the estimated retail value of the content
alone exceeds the total project cost. This is due to hefty costshare in the form of discounts from Worldreader’s publishing

TABLE 7
Individual Library BLUEBox Costs
YEAR

COST

DEVICES

BOOKS /
DEVICE

PEOPLE
IMPACTED

NOTES
Includes hardware and accessories, books, launch and
training costs, Worldreader technical support, project

1

$10,325

35

100

805

manager salary, construction of a charging station
and miscellaneous program costs; does not include a
Worldreader trainer at launch; "People Impacted" figure
assumes 23 people impacted per device
Includes replacement devices, 50 additional titles per
device (25 per year), Worldreader technical support,

2&3

$7,402

35

150

402

project manager salary, and miscellaneous program
costs; the "People Impacted" figure assumes a
25% patron turnover rate and is in addition to the
Y1 people impacted

Total

17,727

70

250

1,20722

Cost per person impacted (3 years)

$14.69

Cost per person impacted (annual average)

$4.90

Value of content per device

$600.00

Assumes average retail value of $4 per book

Value of content in library

$21,000

Across 35 e-readers

Worldreader assumes 23 people impacted per e-reader deployed, based on data from Project LEAP that shows 70 people
trained per e-reader. Worldreader makes a conservative estimate that 2/3 of these people are either repeat trainees or do not
become active users of the library after training, to arrive at the multiplier of 23 people impacted per device deployed.

22

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25

and device partners, that contribute towards keeping the cost of
BLUEBoxes low.
When we apply the model to a larger scale (20,000 devices
deployed), we see the cost per person impacted drop considerably, to less than $8. See Table 8 for a cost breakdown, and this
report’s appendices for a more detailed analysis. At scale, the unit
costs cost for books, shipping and customs are significantly lower,
which leads to significant cost savings.

TABLE 8
Costs for Library Model at Scale (20,000 devices)
YEAR

COST

DEVICES

BOOKS /
DEVICE

PEOPLE
IMPACTED

NOTES
Includes hardware and accessories, books, launch
and training costs, Worldreader technical support,
project manager salary, construction of a charging

1

$3,058,000

20,000

100

460,000

station and miscellaneous program costs; does not
include a Worldreader trainer at launch; "People
Impacted" figure assumes 23 people impacted
per device;
Includes replacement devices, 100 additional titles
per device (50 per year), Worldreader technical

2&3

$2,152,000

20,000

200

230,000

support, project manager salary, and miscellaneous program costs; the “People Impacted” figure
assumes a 25% patron turnover rate and is in
addition to the Y1 people impacted

Total

$5.21 million

40,000

300

690,000

Cost per person impacted (3 years)

$7.55

Cost per person impacted (annual average)

$2.52

Value of content per device

$800.00

Value of content in library

$16 million

Assumes average retail value of $4 per book
Across 20,000 e-readers

Such data point to the potential for e-readers to be an efficient
and cost effective way to rapidly increase the collections of Africa’s
libraries, both on an individual library basis, and at national or
multi-national scale.

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26

Operational Learnings:
Policies and Procedures
Borrowing
By the end of the project, three of the eight libraries allowed
overnight borrowing of the e-readers by patrons and one additional library allowed staff to take the e-readers home. Criteria to
allow overnight borrowing was generally that patrons be registered
and frequent library users (at least 2x per week). Borrowing was
generally only allowed for one night. This criterion has been incorporated into the Recommendations section.

Time management
The amount of time required to implement the program was at
least 20 hours per month, depending on the amount of outreach
conducted. While this was a pilot program that included a heavy
amount of reporting for research purposes, it is still important to
note that these programs cannot run on their own. Amount of time
required to implement the program was one of the most common
complaints from project librarians. Worldreader worked with librarians to discuss options for volunteers, school teachers, and other
librarians to take ownership over parts of LEAP. However, this was
somewhat difficult given the fact that the program was already
underway, and other library stakeholders already saw the project
managers as owning the project. As outlined in the Recommendations section, Worldreader recommends that a decentralized
model of management be implemented from the start of the
program, as to minimize burden on project managers.

Record-keeping
The program highlighted the fact that record keeping varies across
libraries. In libraries already overburdened and understaffed, record
keeping can be too time consuming. The program highlighted the
need for record keeping to be in line with existing mechanisms.
For example, knls libraries report to headquarters using Excel. As
such, it makes the most sense for the e-reader reporting to sync
up with these existing methods.

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Device Charging and the Solar Pilot
Two of the LEAP libraries participated in Worldreader’s solar pilot
initiative, aimed at identifying a solar charging solution for rural
schools and libraries. After research and internal product testing,
which involved discussions with industry experts and nearly a
dozen companies as well as testing at our San Francisco, CA
office and in Kisumu, Kenya, a field test was conducted of two
separate products with eight school and library partners. The
project sites had either no electricity at all or very unreliable grid
connections. Baseline and endline assessments were conducted,
and each site also kept a daily log of the how the solar solution
was used. After collecting all of the feedback and making several
follow-up visits to each location, the BBOXX BB17 was selected
as the solar solution that will be rolled out to partners.
The two libraries that participated in the study reported significant
additional effort to charge their devices, before the solar charging
solution was incorporated. At one site, the project manager would
use her own money to charge e-readers at the local market, and
long periods of blackouts making e-readers impossible to charge
for days on end at the other project site. Having access to a solar
charging solution significantly changed the ease of implementing
the program for these two libraries. It also provided them with
charging options for mobile phones and lights for readers to use
at night.

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Recommendations
The recommendations outlined here are drawn directly from feedback from LEAP librarians and Worldreader staff, along with observations from the field. They apply to the three
primary target audiences, all of which have decision-making power when it comes to implementing digital reading programs through libraries. These audiences are: librarians (who
are responsible for the daily implementation of such program); implementing organizations
(who may coordinate the implementation of multiple digital reading programs); and policy
makers (who are responsible for scale-up of these programs through national institutions,
and the authorship of policies that support scale-up).
Three success factors emerge from the results and lessons presented in the preceding
sections, each of which are key to the scale-up of digital reading programs in Africa’s
libraries. These are worth mentioning for all audiences of the report:
•• A dedicated project manager who has an ongoing commitment to support the digital
reading program is key for both logistical coordination and ensuring a strategic direction
for the e-reader program.
•• Content that is appropriate for the target patron population is key for ensuring the
e-readers’ utilization. Content that patrons want to read is essential for drawing them
to the devices and sustaining their use. As such, special attention should be paid to
content selection, with each library’s patron population in mind.
•• A benefit of the e-reader is its portability, which allows for frequent outreach into
communities. This outreach is a necessary part of the program and prioritized, given
its potential for extending the reach of libraries into local communities, raising libraries’
profiles, and attracting new patrons who may not have known about the library before.
Other, audience-specific recommendations are outlined below.

Librarians
These recommendations and more have been incorporated into Worldreader’s library
program handbook, which can be found at: www.worldreader.org/BLUEBox. Most of
these recommendations come directly from LEAP pilot librarians.
Link your project goals to the content you put on the e-readers: Set a goal before the start
of the program to determine what kind of content your project will need. For example, if
you’d like to use the e-reader project to bring more adolescent girls into the library, then
you need more content appropriate for this population.
Engage and train other library staff early on: While one staff member should be in charge
of the project, engage other staff early on, training them and getting their buy-in into the
program. Delegate program management among staff and volunteers to lessen the burden
on any one individual.
Engage teachers for school-based outreach and trainings: consider engaging teachers
early on. Empowering teachers to own the project, train students, and manage e-reader
inventory will help lesson your workload.

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Encourage digital reading beyond e-readers: Consider other tools for reading when
demand is high and e-readers are scarce. This includes Worldreader Mobile, and a
pre-loaded Worldreader Mobile mobile phone is now a standard part of the library
BLUEBox package.
Schedule outreach around school holidays: More e-readers are needed for in-library
training and usage during school holidays, as many students flock to the libraries during
these times. Do not do as many outreach activities during holidays, in order to ensure
e-readers are available at the library facility.
Remember these tips for conserving device power: turn off advertisements to conserve
energy; turn down screen brightness when using in well- lit areas; make-sure device wi-fi
is turned off unless new content is being downloaded. With regular use and these power-saving measures, devices should stay charged for at least two weeks.
Develop a regular schedule of in-library trainings: As opposed to conducting ad-hoc oneon-one trainings with new e-reader users, consider a regularly scheduled training program
(for example, once or twice a week). This will allow you to train more participants at once,
thus saving your time and energy.
Students and patrons are the best publicity for the program: Encourage them to share
their experiences and get others excited.
Daily record keeping (during training and outreach) makes regular reporting easier: Make
sure to keep records throughout to prevent a lot of work at the end of the month.

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Use trainings and outreach for building collective responsibility for the devices: Continually
emphasize proper e-reader handling during trainings and outreach, even for those patrons
who have handled the devices before.
Collect regular feedback from patrons: This will ensure the program is having its intended
impacts on patrons, and allow you to trouble shoot any issues that may arise.
Develop written guidelines for overnight e-reader borrowing: These depend on each
library environment, however they may include amount of time as a member (for example,
minimum one year), no current late fees, and valid ID and contact information on file. It’s
recommended that e-readers not be borrowed overnight for longer than two nights (or
a weekend).

Implementing Organizations
Most of the recommendations for librarians are also relevant to implementing organizations. Additionally, the following should be considered:
Engage local education officials early on: This is key, particularly for sourcing content, in
order to ensure that appropriate curriculum is included on the e-readers.
Deploy more e-readers for larger libraries: the number of e-readers distributed should be
based on current patronage, at a ratio of approximately one e-reader per 20 patrons.
Think creatively about how digital reading can increase access to specific information:
explore the possibility for the e-reader to provide specific content and information that is
relevant to the community, beyond content to encourage literacy and reading: such as
sexual and reproductive health information for women and adolescents, etc.

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Provide opportunities for project manager networking: Regular
points of contact between project managers will allow them to
troubleshoot issues as they arise, and will encourage creativity
through the exchange of ideas.
Ensure reliable power for smooth project implementation:
Ensuring that a reliable power source is available within the library
compound will guarantee maximum device availability, and will
also ensure efficient use of project managers’ time. This may
mean connecting to the existing power grid or using an alternative
energy source.

Policymakers
In addition to the above recommendations for librarians and implementing organizations, policymakers should also consider the
following:
Guarantee the allocation of sufficient funds for program expenses:
In addition to the obvious hardware, content and personnel
costs, this includes charging stations, electricity for charging, and
funds for travel for program managers. See Cost-Effectiveness to
estimate the amount of funds needed per program.
Develop partnerships with local publishers early on: Begin discussing content licensing with local publishers particularly for larger
scale projects where thousands of copies of a particular title may
be distributed. It’s important to have buy-in from publishers early
on to ensure appropriate content is available to libraries.
Support professional development for project managers and librarians: As the LEAP pilot demonstrated, digital reading programs
often open up more areas of interest for librarians, including the
implementation of further technology programs. As such, professional development opportunities should be made available for
librarians to build the skills necessary to successfully implement
expanded programs.
Plan for the expansion of technology in libraries: As digital reading
programs have been shown to increase patrons’ enthusiasm for
technology in general, long-term planning for incorporating more
technology programs into libraries is key for ensuring sustained
gains in patronage over the next five to ten years.

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Opportunities
for further research
While the findings presented here are extensive, they also bring
up a number of questions for further research into digital reading
through libraries.
First, follow-up is needed to understand whether gains in
patronage as a result of the program are sustained in the long run.
Follow-up is also needed to assess the ongoing functionality and
operation of the devices after more months of implementation.
Second, while this report outlines many of the outputs related to
project LEAP, there are a number of potential outcomes that merit
further investigation, including effects of the program on literacy
skills, academic success, and more. More research into these
outcomes will serve researchers and implementers in better understanding the full impact of library-based digital reading programs.
Finally, developing a sustainable pricing model for content licensing
that works for both libraries and publishers is key to the future of
digital reading in libraries. While content licensing had few implications for the LEAP pilot program, the growth of digital reading
programs in Kenya will eventually require a systematic approach
to acquiring content that can be borrowed. With existing partnerships with the publishing industry in Kenya and other developing
countries, Worldreader is already exploring this area in preparation
for LEAP scale-up.

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The results presented in this report show that e-readers are a cost-effective, appropriate technology for use in libraries in sub-Saharan Africa. They are easy to operate and
well liked by patrons and librarians alike. Compared to other types of technology, they
are energy-efficient and the addition of solar charging solutions makes them even more
accessible for
rural libraries.
Moreover, their portability makes them the perfect tool for expanding the reach of the
library into local communities through outreach. In the case of LEAP, e-readers allowed
librarians to think creatively about outreach, particularly into more rural communities,
because they weren’t constrained by the logistics of transporting paper books.
However, we know technology alone isn’t enough to drive the impressive gains in
patronage seen through project LEAP. Appealing and relevant content tailored to the
libraries’ needs was vital in ensuring program success.
The increase in the libraries’ collections, excitement around new technology, and ability
to conduct frequent outreach into communities raised the profile of the libraries within
their communities, drawing thousands more patrons into the libraries’ physical spaces.
These patrons are reading more and accessing more of the library’s services as a
result.
LEAP has shown that digital reading programs can in fact open up libraries to other
technology programs, helping them look towards a future that meets the needs of a
growing patron population.
Library-based e-reader programs are not without challenges: they require a significant investment in staff time and library infrastructure. And with high levels of patron
demand, there never seem to be enough e-readers for everyone who wants to
use them.
But overall these findings bring us to an important conclusion: By bridging the traditional notion of a library as a repository of books with the modern day need for the
library to extend its reach beyond its walls, digital reading programs can play a key role
in driving the development of sub-Saharan African libraries. Such programs may be
key for transforming libraries and meeting the needs of patrons looking to expand their
horizons in the 21st century.

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Acknowledgements
This report is the result of a yearlong partnership between eight
Kenyan libraries, Worldreader and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The report’s principal author was Sarah Jaffe, Senior
Manager of Research at Worldreader. Martine James Omondi
conducted data analysis and provided other significant inputs to
the authorship of the report.

Additional input was provided by Tina Tam, Zev Lowe, Joan Mwachi-Amolo and David Risher. The report-writing team would like to
thank Rachel Mai Tran for her assistance, and Darren Hoerner for
his ever-valuable input.

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Works Cited
African Public Libraries Summit, n.d., “Communique: African Public Libraries
Summit: ‘Informing Africa, Developing Africa.’”
Accessed at: http://www.african-public-libraries-summit.org/ressources/
APLS2012/div/Communique_Framework_African_Public_Libraries_Summit.
pdf.

Aspen Institute (2015), “Rising to the Challenge: Re-envisioning public
libraries.”
Accessed at: http://www.aspeninstitute.org/sites/default/files/content/docs/
pubs/AspenLibrariesReport.pdf

Consumer Reports (2013), “E-reader failure rates.”
Accessed at: http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/electronics-computers/
phones-mobile-devices/e-book-readers/e-book-reader-ratings/brand-reliability.htm

Goethe-Institut Kenya (2012), “The Library Landscape in Kenya. An
Overview.”
Accessed at: http://www.goethe.de/ins/ke/nai/kul/mag/bib/bil/en9853827.
htm

Internet World Stats.
Accessed at: http://www.internetworldstats.com/stats.htm on February 11,
2015.

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Works Cited
Kinya, Dr. Henry DS (2011), “Public Libraries in Kenya: Collection Development.”
Accessed at: http://www.ijhssnet.com/journals/Vol._1_No._9_Special_
Issue_July_2011/31.pdf.

Knls (n.d.), “Strategic Plan 2013 – 2017.”
Accessed at: http://www.knls.ac.ke/about-us/strategic-plan

Krolak, L (2005) for UNESCO, “The Role of Libraries in the creation of
literate environments.”
Accessed at: http://www.ifla.org/files/assets/literacy-and-reading/publications/role-of-libraries-in-creation-of-literate-environments.pdf

Makotsi, Ruth (2004), “Sharing Resources - how library networks can help
reach education goals,” cited in Krolak, L (2005).

SACMEQ III (2011)
Accessed at: http://www.sacmeq.org/sacmeq-projects/sacmeq-iii/reports

UNFPA (2013), “Kenya Population Situational Analysis.”
Accessed at: http://countryoffice.unfpa.org/kenya/drive/FINALPSAREPORT.pdf

Project LEAP

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Appendix 1
Library Selection Criteria and Process
Library selection was conducted by The LEAP project team
conducted the library selection process in October and November
2013. Given Worldreader’s existing presence and expertise in
Western Kenya, libraries were selected from Kisumu, Kakamega
and Busia counties.
The process used to select libraries for Project LEAP was
designed to identify the most motivated librarians to manage the
pilot and to elevate the sense of accountability on the librarian’s
part. The process involved a thorough application form combined
with on-site interviews of shortlisted candidates. Finalists were
subsequently required to sign a Memorandum of Understanding
(MOU) detailing financial and operational commitments on both
ends. The selection criteria included:
•• Fulfillment of research design requirements (i.e. location, affiliation, etc.)
•• Accessibility of the library to the general community
•• Thoroughness of application and alignment of application short
answers with Project LEAP priorities

Demonstrated interest and passion on the part of the librarian/
project manager
Commitment to a set of project requirements, both operational
and financial: engagement of at least one full-time staff member;
execution of requirements such as reporting and reading activities;
and construction of charging station and purchase of power strips
Upon completing the selection process, the project managers, on
behalf of their libraries, were already invested in the project and
had a full understand the commitments required. At the start of the
project, the one library that did not demonstrate the expected level
of commitment was quickly replaced.

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Appendix 2. M&E Tools

Libraries, E-reading, Activities, Partnership (LEAP)
1.1 BASELINE TOOL
Library Name: _______________________________
Name of person completing report: ______________________
Date of report submission: ______
I. PATRONAGE AND READERSHIP
1. Number of unique patrons who visited the library in January 2014: ______
*Count each patron only once
2. Number female: ____
3. Number in each age group:
0 – 12: ___

19—24: ____

35—44: ___

13—18: ___

25 – 34: ____

45—54: ___

55 and above: ___

4. Number of library visits in January 2014: ______
*Individual patrons may be double counted here. Each visit to the library should be counted once.

5. Number of books borrowed in January 2014: _______
*Individual books may be double counted here. Each time a book was borrowed counts once.

4. Number of books returned in January 2014: _____
*Individual books may be double counted here. Each time a book was returned counts once.

II. LIBRARY ACTIVITIES
1. Number of library activities held in January 2014: _____
“Library activities” are defined as activities focused on engaging patrons in reading
and utilization of library services, such as book clubs, study groups, storytelling
sessions, etc.

2. Types of library activities carried out in January (list all that apply):
_______________
______________________________________________________________________
3. Total number of people who attended library activities in January :
______________

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Libraries, E-reading, Activities, Partnership (LEAP)
1.1 BASELINE TOOL
Library Name: _______________________________
Name of person completing report: ______________________
4. Target age groups:
Date
of report submission: ______
____________________________________________________
I. PATRONAGE
AND READERSHIP
5. Approximate
% female: _____
1. Number of unique patrons who visited the library in January 2014: ______
*Count each
patron only once
III. COMMUNITY
OUTREACH
2.
Number
female: ____
Number
of community
outreach/public relations activities carried out by the library in
the last month: ______
3. Number in each age group:
“Community outreach/ Public Relations Activities” include any activities focused on bringing
patrons
the library and19—24:
making the
surrounding35—44:
community
and the ___
0
– 12: to___
____
___aware of the
55library
and above:
services it offers. This may include passing out pamphlets or attending community events to
publicize the
library.
13—18:
___
25 – 34: ____
45—54: ___

4. Number of library visits in January 2014: ______
*Individual patrons may be double counted here. Each visit to the library should be counted once.

5. Number of books borrowed in January 2014: _______
*Individual books may be double counted here. Each time a book was borrowed counts once.

4. Number of books returned in January 2014: _____
*Individual books may be double counted here. Each time a book was returned counts once.

II. LIBRARY ACTIVITIES
1. Number of library activities held in January 2014: _____
“Library activities” are defined as activities focused on engaging patrons in reading
and utilization of library services, such as book clubs, study groups, storytelling
sessions, etc.

2. Types of library activities carried out in January (list all that apply):
_______________
______________________________________________________________________
3. Total number of people who attended library activities in January :
______________

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Libraries, E-reading, Activities, Partnership (LEAP)
1.2
BASELINE LIBRARY PATRON SURVEY
Date: ______________
Library Name: __________________
1. Where do you reside? ________________________________
2.

What is your gender? (tick only one)
Male
Female

3.

In which age group do you belong? (tick only one)
0 – 12
35—44
13—18
45—54
19—24
55 and above
25 – 34

4.

What is the highest level of education you have completed? (tick only one)
None completed
Diploma/certificate
Primary or lower
University or higher
Secondary

5.

Approximately how frequently do you use the library? (tick only one)
More than once per week
About once every six months
About once per week
About once per month
About once every 3 months

6.

About once per year or less often
This is my first visit
I don’t know

Have you visited the library in the last week? (Tick only one)
Yes
No

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7.
I have engaged in the following activities at a public library in the last 12 months:
(Please
select all that apply)
Browsed/ read books or newspapers (paper)
Browsed/ read books or newspapers (e-books)
Borrowed/ returned/ renewed books or other material such as DVDs,
CDs, Videos, CD-ROMS
Used a computer (e.g. to use word processing/ database/
spreadsheet packages etc)
Accessed the Internet on a library computer or on my own mobile
device or laptop using library WiFi (this includes using the Internet for
Facebook or Skype)
Used photocopier/ fax
Used other facilities for example, café, toilet, shop
Received one-to-one advice on how to find information on the Internet
or use a computer
Participated in an in-person course or training session
Attended an event/exhibition/meeting
Done voluntary work at a library
Something else
Don’t know
8.

Do you use any other technology available at the library? Tick only one:
Yes
No

9.

If you answered yes to 8, please list the technologies you use: __________________
______________________________________________________________________

10.

Approximately how often do you use technology at the library?
Multiple times per week
Once a month
Once per week
A few times per year
A few times per month
Once a year

11.

During the last month, have any of you or your family members attended any events
at the library? Tick only one:
Yes
No

12.
If you answered yes to question 10, which events did you attend?
_________________
______________________________________________________________________

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13.

How satisfied were you with the content and material offered in the program?
Tick only one:

Very unsatisfied
Unsatisfied
Neither satisfied nor unsatisfied
Satisfied
Very satisfied

14.

What types of programs would you be interested in seeing at the library in the future?
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________

15.

Please write down any other feedback you would like to provide: _______________
____________________________________________________________________

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Libraries, E-reading, Activities, Partnership (LEAP)
1.5 BASELINE LIBRARY STAFF SURVEY
Please complete the following survey and return to Worldreader staff, sealed in the provided
envelope. Mark and “X” on the seal of the envelope. All answers provided will remain anonymous.
Worldreader will not share any individual responses with library staff or publically.
Date of survey: __________________________
1.

How long have you worked at the library? ___________________________

2.

Approximately how many hours did you work in the library in the last week? ______

3.

During the last week, how often did you recommend specific library materials to
patrons?

4.

Do you use any other technology available at the library? Tick only one:
Yes
No

5.

If you answered yes to 4, please list the technologies you use: __________________
______________________________________________________________________

6.

Approximately how often do you use technology at the library?
Multiple times per week
Once a month
Once per week
A few times per year
A few times per month
Once a year

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Libraries, E-reading, Activities, Partnership (LEAP)
1.4 MONTHLY MONITORING REPORT
LIBRARY NAME: __________________________________________________________________
PROJECT MANAGER NAME: ________________________________________________________
DATE OF REPORT: _______
DATES COVERED IN THIS REPORT: ______
*Information included in this report should only cover the dates you list above. Do not include information from
previous reporting periods.

I. PATRONAGE
1.

Total number of library patrons this month: ________
*Count each patron only once

2.

Number female: _____

3.

Approximate percentage in each age group:
0 – 12: ___

19—24: ____

35—44: ___

13—18: ___

25 – 34: ____

45—54: ___

55 and above: ___

II. OVERALL COLLECTION:
1.

Total number of books borrowed: ______
*Do not include e-books

2.

Total number of books returned: ______
*Do not include e-books

III. E-READER COLLECTION:
1.

Total number of times e-readers were borrowed: _______

2.

Total number of individual patrons who borrowed e-readers: ______
*Count each patron only once

3.

Total number female: _______

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4.

Approximate percentage in each age group:
0 – 12: ___

19—24: ____

35—44: ___

13—18: ___

25 – 34: ____

45—54: ___

55 and above: ___

5.

Number of e-readers that are broken: _____

6.

Please describe the breakage and how it happened: __________________________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________

7.

Have the broken e-readers been repaired? Tick one:
Yes
No

8.

Number of e-readers that have been stolen: _____

9.
____

Please describe the measures you have taken or will take to prevent future theft:
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________

IV.

E-READER TRAINING IN LIBRARIES:
1.

Total number of e-reader training sessions held in the library: _____

2.

Total number of patrons who participated in e-reader training: ______
*Count each individual patron only once

3.

Total number female: _____

4.

Approximate percentage in each age group:

5.

0 – 12: ___

19—24: ____

35—44: ___

13—18: ___

25 – 34: ____

45—54: ___

55 and above: ___

Please share any lessons learned or insights from trainings. What went well? What
didn’t go well? What advice would you give to other library staff?

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5.

0 – 12: ___

19—24: ____

35—44: ___

13—18: ___

25 – 34: ____

45—54: ___

55 and above: ___

Please share any lessons learned or insights from trainings. What went well? What
didn’t go well? What advice would you give to other library staff?
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________

V.

E-READER TRAINING OUTSIDE OF LIBRARIES:
1.

Total number of e-reader training sessions held outside of the library: _____

2.

Total number of participants in e-reader training: ______
*Count each individual only once

VI.

3.

Total number female: _____

4.

Approximate percentage in each age group:
0 – 12: ___

19—24: ____

35—44: ___

13—18: ___

25 – 34: ____

45—54: ___

55 and above: ___

ADDITIONAL COMMUNITY OUTREACH/EVENTS:
*This should include community activities and events NOT focused on training. Training may be a
small component, but the main focus should be something other than training.

1.

Number of community outreach/ PR activities/campaigns on e-reader program
conducted: ______
*“Community outreach/ Public Relations Activities” include any activities focused on bringing patrons to
the library and making the surrounding community aware of the library and the services it offers. This
may include passing out pamphlets or attending community events to publicize the library.

2.

Types of activities held: ________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________

3.

What would you repeat the next time you hold activities? What was successful?
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________

4.

What would you do differently next time? ____________________________________
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_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
4.

What would you do differently next time? ____________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________

VI.

OPERATIONS
1.

How well is the current system for patrons to borrow e-readers functioning? (Tick one)
Very poorly
Poorly
Neither poorly nor well
Well
Very Well

2.

Please describe the current system being used for borrowing e-readers (if this is the
same as the last monthly report, put “Same” and move to Question 4.):
____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________

3.

If the borrowing system has changed, why did you decide to implement these
changes to the borrowing system?
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________

4.

Can patrons take the e-readers home? Tick one:
Yes
No

5.

If you answered yes to question 4, please describe the criteria you are using to
decide who can take the e-readers home:
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________

VII.

LESSONS LEARNED
1.

Name 3 successes you experienced implementing the e-reader program this month:
1.

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______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
VII.

LESSONS LEARNED
1.

Name 3 successes you experienced implementing the e-reader program this month:
1.
2.
3.

2.

Name 3 challenges you experience implementing the e-reader program this month:
1.
2.
3.

3.

Is there anything else you would like to share with the Worldreader team on how the
e-reader program is going?
_____________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________

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49

Libraries, E-Reading, Activities, Partnership (LEAP)
1.5 DEVICE SURVEY REPORT
Use the device survey worksheet to complete surveys of each device and record your findings. Using these
worksheets, please complete this report, listing the 10 most popular books (books most recently opened).
Please conduct this activity 3x per year, according to the schedule: First report April 15, 2014.

1. Total number of books opened (across all e-readers): ______
2. Number of books completed (90% or more read, total, across all e-readers): ____
3. Number of books with 50 – 90% read (total, across all e-readers): ____
4. Number of books with 25 – 49% read (total, across all e-readers): ____
Using individual e-reader data, please list the 10 most common recently opened books:
#

Title

Number of devices

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

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Libraries, E-reading, Activities, Partnership (LEAP)
1.6 PATRON SURVEY
COVER SHEET
Please fill out this cover sheet to report overall findings from patron survey. Use individual surveys
below, printing out one survey per person.
Please administer this survey to 25% of e-reader users. To randomly select survey participants, see
the worksheet: “LEAP e-Reader Borrowing Record.” e-Reader users should sign- in chronologically
on the register (do not skip lines). Some lines on the sheet will be market with asterisks (**). When a
user signs in on a numbered line with an asterisk, administer the survey to that participant.
Surveys for adults should be administered in writing. Surveys for children should be administered
orally, and you should record the results on the survey form. All survey results are to remain
anonymous. Remind patrons that their results will not be shared and that there are no right or
wrong answers. Submit completed survey forms, along with this cover page, to Worldreader by the
specified deadline.
Library name: _________________________
Date of report submission: _______
Number of users surveyed: ______
Dates covered: _____________________
Summary of main findings (3-5 sentences): _____________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________

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Libraries, E-reading, Activities, Partnership (LEAP)
LIBRARY PATRON SURVEY
Date: ______________
Library name: ______________________________
1. Where do you reside? ________________________________
2. How do you arrive at the library?
On foot
Bicycle
Car

Matatu
Motorcycle

3.

What is your gender? (tick only one)
Male
Female

4.

In which age group do you belong? (tick only one)
0 – 12
35—44
13—18
45—54
19—24
55 and above
25 – 34

5.

What is the highest level of education you have completed? (tick only one)
None completed
Diploma/certificate
Primary or lower
University or higher
Secondary

6.

Approximately how frequently do you use the library? (tick only one)
More than once per week
About once every six months
About once per week
About once per month
About once every 3 months

7.

About once per year or less often
This is my first visit
I don’t know

Have you visited the library in the last week? (Tick only one)
Yes
No

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8.
I have engaged in the following activities at a public library in the last 12 months:
(Please
select all that apply)
Browsed/ read books or newspapers (paper)
Browsed/ read books or newspapers (e-books)
Borrowed/ returned/ renewed books or other material such as DVDs,
CDs, Videos, CD-ROMS
Used a computer (e.g. to use word processing/ database/
spreadsheet packages etc)
Accessed the Internet on a library computer or on my own mobile
device or laptop using library WiFi (this includes using the Internet for
Facebook or Skype)
Used photocopier/ fax
Used other facilities for example, café, toilet, shop
Received one-to-one advice on how to find information on the Internet
or use a computer
Participated in an in-person course or training session
Attended an event/exhibition/meeting
Done voluntary work at a library
Something else
Don’t know
9.

When was the last time you used the e-reader?
Tick only one option, choosing the most recent:

Today
Yesterday
Within the past week
Within the past two weeks
Within the last month
Don’t know
Other (please describe): ______________________________
10.

If you answered “today,” “yesterday,” or “within the past week” to question 9,
approximately how many times have you used an e-reader in the last 7 days? (If you
answered something else, please skip to question 12)
__________

11.

Please tick your reasons for using the e-reader in the last week: (tick all that apply)
To revise
To read for pleasure
To read to a child
To help a child with homework
To get practical information for my daily life (health, agriculture, etc)
To research a specific topic of interest
Work-related
To improve my reading skills
Other (please describe):_________________________________________

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________________________________________________________________
12.

How did you first hear about the e-reader program? Tick only one:
Library staff
Public event
Friend or family member
Poster or flyer
Library patron
Other (please describe): ____________

13.

Are you able to find the books/materials you were looking for on the e-reader?
Tick only one:
Yes
No
Sometimes

14.

If you answered “no” or “sometimes”, what materials are you looking for that you
cannot find?
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________

15.
What is your favorite book on the e-reader?
___________________________________
16.

How have your reading habits changed since you started using the e-reader?
They have not changed
I read less
I read the same
I read more

17.

How easy or difficult do you find the e-reader to use? (tick only one)
Very difficult
Difficult
Neither easy nor hard
Easy
Very easy

18.

Generally, what are your feelings towards using the e-reader? Tick only one:
Strongly dislike
Dislike
Neither like nor dislike
Like
Strongly Like

19.

Have you recommended the e-reader to a friend or family member? Tick only one:
Yes
No

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20.

If you answered yes to question 19, approximately how many? _________

21.

Do you use any other technology available at the library? Tick only one:
Yes
No

22.
If you answered yes to 19, please list the technologies you use:
__________________
______________________________________________________________________
23.

Approximately how often do you use technology at the library?
More than once per week
About once every six months
About once per week
About once per month
About once every 3 months

24.

About once per year or less often
This is my first visit
I don’t know

During the last month, have any of you or your family members attended any events
at the library? Tick only one:
Yes
No

25.
If you answered yes, which events did you attend?
_____________________________
______________________________________________________________________
26.

How satisfied were you with the content and material offered in the program?
Tick only one:

Very unsatisfied
Unsatisfied
Neither satisfied nor unsatisfied
Satisfied
Very satisfied

27.

What types of programs would you be interested in seeing at the library in the future?
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________

28.

Please write down any other feedback you would like to provide: ______________
____________________________________________________________________

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Libraries, E-reading, Activities, Partnership (LEAP)
1.7 LIBRARY STAFF SURVEY
Please complete the following survey and return to Worldreader staff, sealed in the provided
envelope. Mark and “X” on the seal of the envelope. All answers provided will remain anonymous.
Worldreader will not share any individual responses with library staff or publically.
Date of survey: __________________________
1.

How long have you worked at the library? ___________________________

2.

When was the last time you used the e-reader?
Tick only one option, choosing the most recent:

Today
Yesterday
Within the past week
Within the past two weeks
Within the last month
Other (please describe): ______________________________

3.

If you answered “today,” “yesterday,” or “within the past week,” approximately how
many times have you used an e-reader in the last 7 days? ____________________

4.

How easy or difficult do you find the e-reader to use? (tick only one)
Very difficult
Difficult
Neither easy nor hard
Easy
Very easy

5.

Generally, what are your feelings towards using the e-reader? (tick only one)
Strongly dislike
Dislike
Neither like nor dislike
Like
Strongly Like

6.

Complete the following statement: “Using the e-reader makes me feel: ___________
_____________________________________________________________________.”

7.

Have you trained library patrons on e-reader usage? (tick only one)
Yes
No

8.

If you answered yes, approximately how many times have you trained library patrons?
_______

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9.

How comfortable do you feel training library patrons on the e-reader? (Tick only one)
Not at all comfortable
Only a little comfortable
Neutral
Comfortable
Very comfortable

10.

Please list any additional training resources you would like Worldreader to provide:
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________

11.

How often do you recommend material on the e-reader to patrons? (Tick only one)
Never
Rarely
Occasionally
Regularly

12.

For what purposes do you recommend the e-reader to patrons? (Tick all that apply)
To study
To read for pleasure
To read to a child
To help a child with homework
To get practical information for daily life (health, agriculture, etc)
To research a specific topic of interest
Work-related
To improve their reading skills
Other:_____________________________________________________

13.

What age group do you feel the e-reader is most relevant for? (Tick all that apply)
0 – 12
13—18
19—24
25 – 34

14.

35—44
45—54
55 and above

Were you able to find the books/materials you were looking for on the e-reader? (Tick
only one)

Yes
No

15.
If you answered no, what materials were you looking for?
_______________________
16.

Do you use the e-reader to read for pleasure? (Tick only one)
Yes
No

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17.

What is your favorite book on the e-reader? _________________________________

18.

Do you use any other technology available at the library? If yes, please list: _______
_____________________________________________________________________

19.

Please use this space to provide any additional feedback to Worldreader: ________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________

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Libraries, E-reading, Activities, Partnership (LEAP)
1.9 ACTIVITY PRE-AND POST-REPORT
Please keep a copy of the pre-report for your own records, and to aid in completing the post-report. If you
completing pre-report by hand and you are unable to make a photocopy for your own records, please alert
Worldreader staff who will make a copy for you. In the case of repeating activities, multiple post-report
activities may be submitted, however it is recommended that one post-activity report be submitted after the
first occurrence.
As there is a limited budget for activities, not all will be provided with WILL funds. However, projects not
awarded funds may still be carried out and reported on by libraries. If a planned activity is not carried out, a
post-activity report should still be submitted, stating that the activity was cancelled. The most successful
projects will be shared.

Library Name: _____________________________________________________
Project Manager Name: _______________________________________________
Date pre-report submitted: _____________

Date post-report submitted: __________

Activity name: ___________________________________________
Activity description: ________________________________________
Name of institution where activity will happen: _________________________________________
Distance of institution from library: ___________________
Frequency (i.e. once, once per month, etc): _______________
Supplies needed: _________________________________
Pre-Activity
Date pre-report submitted:

Post-Activity
Date post-report submitted:

Proposed Activity Date:

Actual Activity Date:

Anticipated attendance:

Actual attendance (total number of attendees):

Target audience (i.e. mothers, secondary
school students, etc):

Number of women:

Approximate percentage in each age group:
0 – 12: ___
13—18: ___
19—24: ____
25 – 34: ____

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35—44: ___
45—54: ___
55 and above: ____
Estimated cost:

Actual cost:

Funds requested from LEAP?

Ratio of e-readers to participants:

Yes
Objectives:

No

Expected outcomes:

Were the objectives achieved? Please
describe:

Actual outcomes:

What was your biggest success?

What would you do differently or change
next time?

Any additional comments or information you would like to provide on this activity:

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2.3 DEVICE SURVEY WORKSHEET
Copy this worksheet to help you review devices for the device survey. Device surveys should be
conducted on each device. Make as many copies as you need (one worksheet per device). Sort the
books by “most recently read” and first write the top 10 book titles, then open each book to see
percentage complete. Then use this worksheet to fill out the Device Survey Report. List each book
opened on the device and the percentage complete. If you need more lines, print additional tables
DEVICE NAME/NUMBER:
DATE OF SURVEY:
#

Title

% Complete

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

61

PROJECT LEAP REPORTING TOOLS
1. Reporting Tools
1.1 Baseline Data Collection Tool
1.2 Baseline Patron Survey
1.3 Baseline Library Staff Survey

1.4 Monthly Monitoring Report

1.5 Device Survey Report

Submission Deadline
March 15, 2014
April 15, 2014
To be carried out by Worldreader staff in MarchApril. Library staff will participate, but no form
submission required.
Submit to Worldreader by the 15th of every month,
beginning in April 2014, reporting on the previous
month’s achievements and activities (for example:
submit a report for March 1 – 31st on April 15th).
Submit 2 times per year by the following deadlines:
• July 15 2014
• February 15, 2014

1.6 Patron Survey

Submit 2 times per year by the following deadlines:
• July 15, 2014
• February 15, 2014

1.7 Library Staff Survey

To be conduced 2 times per year by Worldreader
staff. Timing will vary by project site, but surveys will
be carried out in the months of:
• July
• January

1.8 Activity Proposal Report

Pre-Activity proposals and funding requests should
be submitted according to the following deadlines:
• March 15, 2014
• July 15, 2014
Post-activity reports should be submitted in one
package for the specified time periods by:
• August 15, 2014 (March 15 – July 30)
• February 15, 2014 (August 1 –February 1)

2. Additional Worksheets: Worldreader strongly recommends the use of these tools to help you
collect data and prepare the official reports required above. However, they are for your own use and
should not be submitted to Worldreader unless requested.

Worksheet
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5

Training attendance record
E-reader borrowing record
Device survey worksheet
Training Summary
Weekly Monitoring Worksheet

Corresponding Report
Activity and monthly monitoring reports
Monthly monitoring reports and Patron Survey
Device survey report
Monthly Monitoring Report
Monthly Monitoring Report

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

62

LIBRARIES, E-READING, ACTIVITIES AND
PARTNERSHIP (LEAP)
ADDITIONAL WORKSHEETS

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

63

2.1
Surname

LEAP TRAINIG ATTENDANCE RECORD
First name

Library User ID #

Age

Gender (M/F)

1.

___________________________________________________________________

2.

___________________________________________________________________

3.

___________________________________________________________________

4. **

___________________________________________________________________

5.

___________________________________________________________________

6.

___________________________________________________________________

7. **

___________________________________________________________________

8.

___________________________________________________________________

9.

___________________________________________________________________

10.

__________________________________________________________________

11.

__________________________________________________________________

12.

__________________________________________________________________

13.

__________________________________________________________________

14.

__________________________________________________________________

15.

__________________________________________________________________

16.

__________________________________________________________________

17.**

__________________________________________________________________

18.

__________________________________________________________________

19.**

___________________________________________________________________

20.**

____________________________________________________________________
2.2

LEAP E-READER BORROWING RECORD (page 1 of 2)

Surname
1.

First name

Library User ID #

Age

Project LEAP
Gender (M/F)

Final Report - February 2015

___________________________________________________________________

64

20.**

____________________________________________________________________
2.2

LEAP E-READER BORROWING RECORD (page 1 of 2)

Surname

First name

Library User ID #

Age

Gender (M/F)

1.

___________________________________________________________________

2.

___________________________________________________________________

3.

___________________________________________________________________

4.

___________________________________________________________________

5.

___________________________________________________________________

6. **

___________________________________________________________________

7.

___________________________________________________________________

8. **

___________________________________________________________________

9.

___________________________________________________________________

10.

__________________________________________________________________

11.**

__________________________________________________________________

12.**

__________________________________________________________________

13.

__________________________________________________________________

14.

__________________________________________________________________

15.

__________________________________________________________________

16.

__________________________________________________________________

17.**

__________________________________________________________________

18.

__________________________________________________________________

19.

___________________________________________________________________

20.

____________________________________________________________________
2.3

LEAP E-READER BORROWING RECORD (page 2 of 2)

Surname
1.

First name

Library User ID #

Age

Project LEAP
Gender
(M/F)
Final Report - February 2015

___________________________________________________________________

65

20.

____________________________________________________________________
2.3

LEAP E-READER BORROWING RECORD (page 2 of 2)

Surname

First name

Library User ID #

Age

Gender (M/F)

1.

___________________________________________________________________

2.

___________________________________________________________________

3.

___________________________________________________________________

4. **

___________________________________________________________________

5.

___________________________________________________________________

6.

___________________________________________________________________

7. **

___________________________________________________________________

8.

___________________________________________________________________

9.

___________________________________________________________________

10.

__________________________________________________________________

11.

__________________________________________________________________

12.

__________________________________________________________________

13.

__________________________________________________________________

14.

__________________________________________________________________

15.

__________________________________________________________________

16.

__________________________________________________________________

17.**

__________________________________________________________________

18.

__________________________________________________________________

19.**

___________________________________________________________________

20.**

____________________________________________________________________
2.3 DEVICE SURVEY WORKSHEET

Copy this worksheet to help you review devices for the device survey. Device surveys should
be
Project LEAP
Final Report - February 2015
conducted on each device. Make as many copies as you need (one worksheet per device). Sort
the books by “most recently read” and first write the book titles, then open each to see percentage

66

19.**

___________________________________________________________________

20.**

____________________________________________________________________
2.3 DEVICE SURVEY WORKSHEET

Copy this worksheet to help you review devices for the device survey. Device surveys should be
conducted on each device. Make as many copies as you need (one worksheet per device). Sort
the books by “most recently read” and first write the book titles, then open each to see percentage
complete. Then use this worksheet to fill out the Device Survey Report. List each book opened on
the device and the percentage complete. If you need more lines, print additional tables
DEVICE NAME:
DATE OF SURVEY:
#

Title

% Complete

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

67

2.4 LEAP TRAINING SUMMARY
Completing this form after every e-reader training will help you collect necessary data for the monthly
monitoring report.
Date of training: ___________

Facilitator Name: _______________________________

Facilitator Title: _________________

Facilitator Gender:

Male
Female

Number of attendees: ___________
Number of attendees in each age group:
0 – 12: ____

19—24: ____

35—44: ____

13—18: ___

25 – 34: ____

45—54: ___

Number of women: _________

55 and above: ____

Average pre-training test score:

________

Average post-training test score:
________
(make sure to save the actual pre- and posttraining tests)
What went well during this
training?________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
What can be improved next
time?_________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

68

Suggestions to Worldreader staff on training materials, format,
etc:_______________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

69

2.5 LEAP WEEKLY MONITORING WORKSHEET
Worldreader recommends completing this sheet once per week to assist with compiling data for
monthly monitoring reports. Collecting data on a weekly basis will help ensure a more manageable
workflow (less work for you the week before monthly reports are due!) and more reliable data.
Weekly reports should not be submitted to Worldreader unless requested.
All numbers should be reported for the reporting period only (that is, for the dates specified).
LIBRARY NAME: __________________________________________________________________
PROJECT MANAGER NAME: ________________________________________________________
DATE OF REPORT: _______
DATES COVERED IN THIS REPORT: ______
*Information included in this report should only cover the dates you list above. Do not include information from
previous reporting periods.

I. PATRONAGE
1.

Total number of unique library patrons this month: ________
*Count each patron only once

2.

Number female: _____

3.

Number in each age group:

4.

0 – 12: ___

19—24: ____

35—44: ___

13—18: ___

25 – 34: ____

45—54: ___

55 and above: ___

Total number of library visits this month: ____________
*Individual patrons may be double counted here. Each visit to the library should be counted once.

II. OVERALL COLLECTION:
1.

Total number of books borrowed: ______
*Do not include e-books

2.

Total number of books returned: ______
*Do not include e-books

III. E-READER COLLECTION:
1.

Total number of e-reader check-outs: _______
*Number of times e-readers have been borrowed

2.

Total number of unique patrons who borrowed e-readers: ______
*Count each patron only once

3.

Total number female: _______

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

4.

Number in each age group:

70

*Count each patron only once
3.

Total number female: _______

4.

Number in each age group:
0 – 12: ___

19—24: ____

35—44: ___

13—18: ___

25 – 34: ____

45—54: ___

55 and above: ___

5.

Number of e-readers that are broken: _____

6.

Please describe the breakage and how it happened: __________________________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________

7.

Have the broken e-readers been repaired? Tick one:
Yes
No

8.

Number of e-readers that have been stolen: _____

9.
____

Please describe the measures you have taken or will take to prevent future theft:
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________

IV.

E-READER TRAINING:
Refer to data recorded on worksheet 2.4: “LEAP Training Summary” for completing
this section of the monthly monitoring report.

V.

COMMUNITY OUTREACH:
1.

Number of community outreach/ PR activities/campaigns on e-reader program
conducted: ______
*“Community outreach/ Public Relations Activities” include any activities focused on bringing patrons to
the library and making the surrounding community aware of the library and the services it offers. This
may include passing out pamphlets or attending community events to publicize the library.

2.

Types of activities held: ________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

71

VI.

3.

What was successful?

4.

What would you do differently next time?

OPERATIONS
1.

How well is the current system for patrons to borrow e-readers functioning? (Tick one)
Very poorly
Poorly
Neither poorly nor well
Well
Very Well

2.

VII.

Please list any successes or challenges you experienced with the borrowing system
this week:

LESSONS LEARNED
1.

List any successes you experienced implementing the e-reader program this week:

2.

List any challenges you experience implementing the e-reader program this week:

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

72

LIBRARIES, E-READING, ACTIVITIES AND PARTNERSHIP (LEAP)
ADDITIONAL WORKSHEETS

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

73

Final Report - February 2015

Project LEAP

74

16**

15

14

13

12

11

10

9

8**

7**

6

5

4**

3

2

1

Surname

First name

Training Date: _______________

2.1

Library User ID

Age

Gender
(M/F)

How many books (ebooks and paper books)
have you read in the last
24 hours?

How many books (ebooks and paper books)
have you read in the last
30 days?

Library Name: _________________________________________________

LEAP TRAINIG ATTENDANCE RECORD

Final Report - February 2015

Project LEAP

75

16**

15

14

13

12**

11**

10

9

8**

7

6**

5

4

3

2

1

Date

Surname

First name
Library User ID

Age

Gender
(M/F)

How many books (ebooks and paper
books) have you read
in the last 24 hours?

LEAP E-READER BORROWING RECORD (page 1 of 2)

Library Name: _________________________________________________

2.2

How many books (ebooks and paper
books) have you read
in the last 30 days?

2.3 DEVICE SURVEY WORKSHEET
Copy this worksheet to help you review devices for the device survey. Device surveys should be
conducted on each device. Make as many copies as you need (one worksheet per device). Sort the
books by “most recently read” and first write the book titles, then open each to see percentage complete.
Then use this worksheet to fill out the Device Survey Report. List each book opened on the device and
the percentage complete. If you need more lines, print additional tables
DEVICE NAME:
DATE OF SURVEY:
#

Title

% Complete

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

76

2.4 LEAP TRAINING SUMMARY
Completing this form after every e-reader training will help you collect necessary data for the monthly
monitoring report.
Date of training: ___________

Facilitator Name: _______________________________

Facilitator Title: _________________

Male
Female

Facilitator Gender:

Number of attendees: ___________
Number of attendees in each age group:
0 – 12: ____

19—24: ____

35—44: ____

13—18: ___

25 – 34: ____

45—54: ___

Number of women: _________

55 and above: ____

Average pre-training test score:

________

Average post-training test score:
________
(make sure to save the actual pre- and post- training
tests)
What went well during this training?________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
What can be improved next time?_________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
Suggestions to Worldreader staff on training materials, format, etc:_______________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

77

2.5 LEAP WEEKLY MONITORING WORKSHEET
Worldreader recommends completing this sheet once per week to assist with compiling data for monthly
monitoring reports. Collecting data on a weekly basis will help ensure a more manageable workflow (less
work for you the week before monthly reports are due!) and more reliable data. Weekly reports should not
be submitted to Worldreader unless requested.
All numbers should be reported for the reporting period only (that is, for the dates specified).
LIBRARY NAME: __________________________________________________________________
PROJECT MANAGER NAME: ________________________________________________________
DATE OF REPORT: _______
DATES COVERED IN THIS REPORT: ______
*Information included in this report should only cover the dates you list above. Do not include information from previous
reporting periods.

I. PATRONAGE
1.

Total number of unique library patrons this month: ________
*Count each patron only once

2.

Number female: _____

3.

Number in each age group:

4.

0 – 12: ___

19—24: ____

35—44: ___

13—18: ___

25 – 34: ____

45—54: ___

55 and above: ___

Total number of library visits this month: ____________
*Individual patrons may be double counted here. Each visit to the library should be counted once.

II. OVERALL COLLECTION:
1.

Total number of books borrowed: ______
*Do not include e-books

2.

Total number of books returned: ______
*Do not include e-books

III. E-READER COLLECTION:
1.

Total number of e-reader check-outs: _______
*Number of times e-readers have been borrowed

2.

Total number of unique patrons who borrowed e-readers: ______
*Count each patron only once

3.

Total number female: _______

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

4.

Number in each age group:

78

*Count each patron only once
3.

Total number female: _______

4.

Number in each age group:
0 – 12: ___

19—24: ____

35—44: ___

13—18: ___

25 – 34: ____

45—54: ___

55 and above: ___

5.

Number of e-readers that are broken: _____

6.

Please describe the breakage and how it happened: __________________________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________

7.

Have the broken e-readers been repaired? Tick one:
Yes
No

8.

Number of e-readers that have been stolen: _____

9.

Please describe the measures you have taken or will take to prevent future theft: ____
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________

IV.

E-READER TRAINING:
Refer to data recorded on worksheet 2.4: “LEAP Training Summary” for completing this
section of the monthly monitoring report.

V.

COMMUNITY OUTREACH:
1.

Number of community outreach/ PR activities/campaigns on e-reader program conducted:
______
*“Community outreach/ Public Relations Activities” include any activities focused on bringing patrons to the
library and making the surrounding community aware of the library and the services it offers. This may include
passing out pamphlets or attending community events to publicize the library.

2.

Types of activities held: ________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

79

VI.

3.

What was successful?

4.

What would you do differently next time?

OPERATIONS
1.

How well is the current system for patrons to borrow e-readers functioning? (Tick one)
Very poorly
Poorly
Neither poorly nor well
Well
Very Well

2.

VII.

Please list any successes or challenges you experienced with the borrowing system this
week:

LESSONS LEARNED
1.

List any successes you experienced implementing the e-reader program this week:

2.

List any challenges you experience implementing the e-reader program this week:

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

80

Appendix 3
Final LEAP Book list

Count Title

Author

Publisher

Country

1

101 English Idioms Explained - Volume 1

Standford, George

Praski Publishing

UK

English

Reference

2

101 English Idioms Explained - Volume 2

Standford, George

Praski Publishing

UK

English

Reference

3

A Fancy Dinner Party

Various

Grey Gecko Press, LLC

US

F

English

Literary Works

4

A Friend for Sam

Labatt, Mary

Canada

A

English

Literary Works

5

A Ghost Tale for Christmas Time (Magic Tree House #44)

Osborne, Mary Pope

Random House Inc.

US

D

English

Literary Works

6

A Good Night For Ghosts (Magic Tree House #42)

Osborne, Mary Pope

Random House Inc.

US

D

English

Literary Works

7

A is for?

Raubenheimer, Paula

Big Bug Books

South Africa A

English

Literary Works

8

A Journey to the Centre of the Earth

Public Domain

US

English

Literary Works

9

A Man of Two Faces

Owino, Henry

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

F

English

Literary Works

10

A Midsummer Night's Dream

Shakespeare, William

Public Domain

US

F

English

Literary Works

11

A Parade for Sam

Labatt, Mary

Canada

Canada

A

English

Literary Works

12

A Passage to India

Forster, E.M.

RosettaBooks

US

F

English

Literary Works

13

A Puppy named Trep

Mpesha, Nyambura

Phoenix Publishers

Kenya

B

English

Literary Works

14

A Short History of the World

Crux Publishing

US

English

Reference

15

A Woman in Her Prime

Konadu, Asare S.

Adaex

Ghana

D

English

Literary Works

16

A Zebra Tale

Kraus, Harry

WordAlive Publishers

Kenya

D

English

Literary Works

17

Abaka's Story

Yamoah, Asare Konadu

Adaex

Ghana

B

English

Literary Works

18

Abiba's Journey

Darmani, Lawrence

Step Publishers

Ghana

B

English

Literary Works

19

Abu Goes to School

Agbalenyo, McClean C. Step Publishers

Ghana

C

English

Literary Works

20

ACT Verbal

BrainMatrix Inc

BrainMatriX, Inc.

US

F

English

Reference

21

ACT Words

BrainMatrix Inc

BrainMatriX, Inc.

US

F

English

Reference

22

African Designs

Kyerewaa, Amma

Amma Kyerewaa

Ghana

F

English

Literary Works

23

After the Rains

Kenya

English

Literary Works

24

Age of Innocence, The

Random House Inc.

US

English

Fiction

25

Aimee and The Witch

Grey Gecko Press, LLC

US

English

Literary Works

26

All About Me

Woode, Pamela Aba

Sam-Woode Ltd.

Ghana

B

English

Literary Works

27

All About Water

Ngure, Jane

The Jomo Kenyatta
Foundation

Kenya

B

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

28

All Squawk, No Talk

Bush, John

Storytime Africa

South Africa B

English

Literary Works

29

Amazingly Easy Phrasal Verbs

Standford, George

Praski Publishing

UK

English

Reference

30

An Enemy Called Average

Mason, John L.

WordAlive Publishers

Kenya

F

English

Literary Works

31

Angel of Light and other stories

Adjekpagbon, Blessed
Mudiaga

Bulkybon Publications

Ghana

E

English

Literary Works

32

Anna Karenina

Tolstoy, Leo

Public Domain

US

F

English

Literary Works

33

At The Crossroads

Wambakha, O

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

F

English

Literary Works

34

Attack of the Shidas: AKAs Save Planet Earth!

Muchemi, Muthoni

Storymoja

Kenya

D

English

Literary Works

35

Bata wa Ajabu

Bakari, Ndugu Atibu W.

Single Education and
Publishers

Kenya

B

Swahili

Literary Works

36

BB Books 1.08 Mbwa mwitu, Mbwa mwitu (Swahili)

Big Bug Books

South Africa

Swahili

Literary Works

37

BB Books 1.09 Panya mweeupe (Swahili)

Big Bug Books

South Africa

Swahili

Literary Works

38

BB Books 1.11 Jogoo mwekundu wa babu (Swahili)

Big Bug Books

South Africa

Swahili

Literary Works

39

BB Books 1.12 Sungura na kizimba (Swahili)

Big Bug Books

South Africa

Swahili

Literary Works

40

BB Books 2.01 Sanduku (Swahili)

Big Bug Books

South Africa

Swahili

Literary Works

41

BB Books 2.02 Tazama, Kierie, tazama! (Swahili)

Big Bug Books

South Africa

Swahili

Literary Works

42

Bed Making Blues (Accepting Responsibility)

De Beezenac, Salem

icharacter

France

B

English

Literary Works

43

Beem Explores Africa

Dosekun, Simidele

Kachifo Limited (Farafina)

Kenya

C

English

Literary Works

44

Beneath Hallowed Ground

Grey Gecko Press, LLC

US

English

Literary Works

45

Beyond the Darkness

Moran Publishers

Kenya

English

Literary Works

46

Beyond the Smoke

JourneyForth Books

US

English

Literary Works

47

Beyond Violence: A True Story of Hurt, Hate and Hope

Leakey Hofmeyr, Agnes The Jomo Kenyatta
Foundation

Kenya

E

English

Literary Works

48

Birago and Grandmother

Hylton-Lartey, Mandy

Step Publishers

Ghana

C

English

Literary Works

49

Blind Voices

Moolman, Kobus

Botsotso Publishing

South Africa F

English

Literary Works

50

Blue Wings

Horwitz, Allan Kolski

Botsotso Publishing

South Africa D

English

Literary Works

51

Bom Boy

Omotoso, Yewande

Modjaji Books

South Africa F

English

Literary Works

52

Boom Boom Bus

Kabugu, Joan Mwihaki

Storymoja

Kenya

English

Literary Works

Kibera, Ngumi

Reading
Level

F

B

Language Genre

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

81

Count Title

Author

Publisher

Country

Reading
Level

Language Genre

53

Brave New World

Huxley, Aldous

RosettaBooks

US

F

English

Literary Works

54

Budding Reader Book Set 1: Cat and Rat (10 books)

Various

Devonhall Publishing LLC

US

A

English

Literary Works

55

Budding Reader Book Set 2: Wit and Kit (10 books)

Various

Devonhall Publishing LLC

US

A

English

Literary Works

56

Budding Reader Book Set 3: Bugs (10 books)

Various

Devonhall Publishing LLC

US

A

English

Literary Works

57

Budding Reader Set 4: Hop! (10 books)

Various

Devonhall Publishing LLC

US

A

English

Literary Works

58

Business English Discussions

Standford, George

Praski Publishing

UK

English

Reference

59

Business English Phrasebook

Standford, George

Praski Publishing

UK

English

Reference

60

Business Management for Senior High Schools

Attieku, Ben

Smartline Publishing

Kenya

SHS

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

61

Cat's Cradle

Vonnegut, Kurt

RosettaBooks

US

F

English

Literary Works

62

Champion: Win the fight, Live your Life

Waweru, David

WordAlive Publishers

Kenya

F

English

Literary Works

63

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Dahl, Roald.

Puffin

UK

D

English

Literary Works

64

Chemistry: SHS; Form 3

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

65

Chura Mcheza Ngoma

Nandwa, Rebecca

Phoenix Publishers

Kenya

C

Swahili

Literary Works

66

Common Reasons Why Start-Up Business Fail and What We
Can Do About It

Kiunga, Murori

Queenex Publishers Limited Kenya

F

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

67

Complete Short Stories of Mark Twain

Random House Inc.

US

English

Literary Works

68

Comprehensive Social Studies Pupil's Book for Standard 1 Kenyan Textbook

Various

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

69

Cookie Rookie (Asking Before Taking)

De Beezenac, Salem

icharacter

France

B

English

Literary Works

70

Courtesy for Boys and Girls

Hagan, Hannah

Adaex

Ghana

B

English

Literary Works

71

Courting Khethiwe

Kyerewaa, Amma

Amma Kyerewaa

Ghana

F

English

Literary Works

72

Crazy English 2 - Intermediate - Upper-intermediate

Standford, George

Praski Publishing

UK

Engli

Reference

73

Crazy English! Advanced - Proficiency

Standford, George

Praski Publishing

UK

English

Reference

74

Crazy English! Intermediate-Upper-intermediate

Standford, George

Praski Publishing

UK

English

Reference

75

Crazy English! Pre-intermediate-Intermediate

Standford, George

Praski Publishing

UK

English

Reference

76

Dare to Dream Again!

Geke, Fred

WordAlive Publishers

Kenya

F

English

Literary Works

77

Diwani ya Akilimali

Akilimali Snow-White,
DHA

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

E

Swahili

Literary Works

78

Dog-Heart

McCaulay, Diana

Peepal Tree Press

UK

F

English

Literary Works

79

Don't Touch that Toad and other Strange Things Adults Tell
You

Rondina, Catherine

Kids Can Press

Canada

B

English

Literary Works

80

Dracula

Stoker, Bram

Random House Inc.

US

F

English

Literary Works

81

Dressing

Raubenheimer, Paula

Big Bug Books

South Africa A

English

Literary Works

82

Dynamics of Business Studies: Form 1

Nasio, J. Abrose

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

SHS

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

83

Dynamics of Business Studies: Form 2

Nasio, J. Abrose

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

SHS

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

84

Echoes of Two Worlds

Kiyeng, S

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

F

English

Literary Works

85

Eddie and Lulu

Atkinson, Hilary

Kidza Books

South Africa C

English

Literary Works

86

Emma

Austen, Jane

Public Domain

US

English

Literary Works

87

End Malaria

Kenya

English

Literary Works

88

English for Interviews

Standford, George

Praski Publishing

UK

English

Reference

89

English for Time Management

Standford, George

Praski Publishing

UK

English

Reference

90

Every Word (A Free Game for Kindle)

Amazon Digital
Services

Amazon Digital Services

US

English

Games

91

Every Word: Crossings (A Free Word Game for Kindle)

Amazon Digital
Services

Amazon Digital Services

US

English

Games

92

Excel and Succeed Malawi: Junior Secondary Agriculture;
Form 2

Ngomwa, Anthony M.

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

SHS

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

93

Excel and Succeed Malawi: Senior Secondary Agriculture;
Form 3

Ngomwa, Anthony M.

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

SHS

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

94

Excel and Succeed Malawi: Senior Secondary Agriculture;
Form 4

Ngomwa, Anthony M.

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

SHS

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

95

Excel and Succeed Malawi: Senior Secondary Biology; Form 4

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

96

Excel and Succeed Malawi: Senior Secondary Computer
Studies; Form 3

Nasalangwa, Andrew

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

SHS

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

97

Excel and Succeed Malawi: Senior Secondary Computer
Studies; Form 4

Nasalangwa, Andrew

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

SHS

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

98

Excel and Succeed Malawi: Senior Secondary English; Form 3 Kadyoma, Fritz

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

SHS

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

99

Excel and Succeed Malawi: Senior Secondary English; Form 4 Kadyoma, Fritz

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

SHS

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

100

Excel and Succeed Malawi: Senior Secondary Life Skills;
Form 3

Nsasa, Herbert R.

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

SHS

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

101

Excel and Succeed Malawi: Senior Secondary Life Skills;
Form 4

Kadyoma, Fritz

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

SHS

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

F

B

102

Faceless

Darko, Amma

Sub Saharan

Ghana

D

English

Literary Works

103

Fading Flowers (Positiveness and cheerfulness)

De Beezenac, Salem

icharacter

France

B

English

Literary Works

104

Fahali Mtoboa Siri

Matandura, Bitugi

Focus Publishers Ltd.

Kenya

D

Swahili

Literary Works

105

Familiar Quotations

Public Domain

US

F

English

Reference

106

Fantastic Mr. Fox

Puffin

UK

D

English

Literary Works

107

Far from the Maddening Crowd

Public Domain

US

English

Literary Works

Dahl, Roald.

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

82

Count Title

Author

Publisher

Country

Reading
Level

Language Genre

108

Fine Boys

Imasuen, Eghosa

Kachifo Limited (Farafina)

Nigeria

E

English

Literary Works

109

Flash Cards: Animals for Kids

Digi Ronin Games
(Editor)

Digi Ronin Games

US

A

English

Literary Works

110

Flash Cards: Foods for Kids

Digi Ronin Games
(Editor)

Digi Ronin Games

US

A

English

Literary Works

111

Flipside

Jeynes, Karen

New Africa Books

South Africa D

English

Literary Works

112

Fractured Lives

Strasburg, Toni

Modjaji Books

South Africa F

English

Literary Works

113

Frankenstein

Shelley, Mary

Random House Inc.

US

F

English

Literary Works

114

Freshers' Welcome

Osei, Samelia

EPP Books Services

Ghana

D

English

Literary Works

115

General Knowledge in Art for Senior High Schools

Effah-Sakyi, Emmanuel Smartline Publishing

Kenya

SHS

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

116

Ghost Town at Sundown (Magic Tree House #10)

Osborne, Mary Pope

Random House Inc.

US

D

English

Literary Works

117

Ghostboy and the Nameless Grave (An Interactive Children's
Book for Kindle)

Robot Media

Robot Media

Spain

D

English

Literary Works

118

GMAT Math

BrainMatrix Inc

BrainMatriX, Inc.

US

F

English

Reference

119

GMAT Verbal

BrainMatrix Inc

BrainMatriX, Inc.

US

F

English

Reference

120

Go Girl: Surf's Up

Hardie Grant Egmont

Australia

English

Fiction

121

Go Tell the Sun

Molefhe, Wame

Modjaji Books

South Africa F

English

Literary Works

122

Good Morning, Gorillas (Magic Tree House #26)

Osborne, Mary Pope

Random House Inc.

US

D

English

Literary Works

123

Grandmother's Winning Smile

Gazemba, Stanley

Imbada Publishers

Kenya

D

English

Literary Works

124

Grandpa Goes to Hospital

Raubenheimer, Paula

Big Bug Books

South Africa C

English

Literary Works

125

GRE Math

BrainMatrix Inc

BrainMatriX, Inc.

US

F

English

Reference

126

GRE Verbal

BrainMatrix Inc

BrainMatriX, Inc.

US

F

English

Reference

127

GRE WORDS

BrainMatrix Inc

BrainMatriX, Inc.

US

F

English

Reference

128

Great Expectations

Dickens, Charles

Random House Inc.

US

F

English

Literary Works

129

Gulliver's Travels

Swift, Jonathan

Public Domain

US

F

English

Literary Works

130

Hands of Destiny

Chikeluba, Anaduaka
Christopher

Bulkybon Publications

Ghana

F

English

Literary Works

131

He Man

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

English

Literary Works

132

Hello Tortoise

Bush, John

Storytime Africa

South Africa B

English

Literary Works

133

Hemispheres: Inside a Stroke

Wharton, Edith

Modjaji Books

South Africa F

English

Literary Works

134

Higher Lessons in English A Work on English Grammar and
Composition

Reed, Alonzo

Public Domain

US

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

135

How the Children Became Stars

Aaron Zerah

Kenya

English

Literary Works

136

How to Get Along With Others

Adaex

Ghana

English

Literary Works

137

How to Remember Names and Numbers

Praski Publishing

Poland

English

Reference

138

How to Speak and Write Correctly

Public Domain

US

English

Reference

139

Humanity: A Short Story Collection

English

Literary Works

140

Huracan

McCaulay, Diana

Peepal Tree Press

UK

F

English

Literary Works

141

Hyena's Wedding Day and Other Stories

Ndirangu, Eutychus

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

C

English

Literary Works

142

I Am Legend

Matheson, Richard

RosettaBooks

US

F

English

Literary Works

143

I Can Read: Fruits We Eat

Mwisho, Faith

Mountain Top Publishers
Ltd.

Kenya

B

English

Literary Works

144

I Know: My Family

Mwisho, Faith

Mountain Top Publishers
Ltd.

Kenya

B

English

Literary Works

145

Ikasi and other plays

Diniso, Gha-Makhulu

Botsotso Publishing

South Africa F

English

Literary Works

146

iLead: Five Insights for Building Sustainable Organizations

Blooming Twig Books LLC

Kenya

English

Reference

147

In Pain We Trust: A Conversation Between Mother and Son on
the Journey from Sickness to Health

Blooming Twig Books LLC

US

English

Literary Works

148

Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl Written by Herself

Public Domain

US

English

Fiction

149

Inventor Secondary Business Studies Form Four Students'
Book

Nyaga, Michael K.

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

SHS

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

150

Inventor Secondary Business Studies Form One Students'
Book

Kenya Literature
Bureau (Editor)

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

SHS

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

151

Inventor Secondary Business Studies Form Three Students'
Book

Nyaga, Michael K.

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

SHS

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

152

Inventor Secondary Business Studies Form Two Students'
Book

Kenya Literature
Bureau (Editor)

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

SHS

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

153

Invisible Man, The

Wells, H.G.

Random House Inc.

US

F

English

Literary Works

154

It Happened in Ghana: A Historical Romance 1824 - 1971

Smith, Noel

Sub Saharan

Ghana

F

English

Literary Works

155

It's Moving Day!

Hickman, Pamela

Canada

Canada

B

English

Literary Works

156

Ivy and Bean (Book 10)

Barrows, Annie

Chronicle Books

Canada

B

English

Literary Works

157

Ivy and Bean and the Ghost That Had to Go: Book 2 (Ivy &
Bean)

Barrows, Annie

Chronicle Books

Canada

B

English

Literary Works

158

Ivy and Bean Bound to Be Bad: Book 5

Barrows, Annie

Chronicle Books

US

B

English

Literary Works

159

Ivy and Bean Break the Fossil Record: Book 3 (Ivy & Bean)

Chronicle Books

US

B

English

Literary Works

160

Ivy and Bean Doomed to Dance: Book 6

Barrows, Annie

Chronicle Books

US

B

English

Literary Works

161

Ivy and Bean Make the Rules (Book 9)

Barrows, Annie

Chronicle Books

US

B

English

Literary Works

162

Ivy and Bean No News Is Good News (Book 8) (Ivy & Bean)

Barrows, Annie

Chronicle Books

US

B

English

Literary Works

Abedi, K. A.
Devlin, Joseph

B
F

Australian LIterature Review Australia

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

83

Count Title

Author

Publisher

Country

Reading
Level

Language Genre

163

Ivy and Bean Take Care of the Babysitter: Book 4 (Ivy & Bean)

Barrows, Annie

Chronicle Books

US

B

English

Literary Works

164

Ivy and Bean What's the Big Idea? (Book 7)

Barrows, Annie

Chronicle Books

US

B

English

Literary Works

165

Ivy and Bean: Book 1 (Ivy & Bean)

Barrows, Annie

Chronicle Books

US

B

English

Literary Works

166

James and the Giant Peach

Dahl, Roald.

Puffin

UK

D

English

Literary Works

167

Jane Eyre

Bronte, Charlotte

Random House Inc.

US

F

English

Literary Works

168

Jigsaw Words (A Free Word Game for Kindle)

Amazon Digital
Services

Amazon Digital Services

US

B

English

Games

169

Just a moment, God! An Anthology of Verse and Prose from
East Africa

Green, Robert (editor)

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

F

English

Literary Works

170

K.C.S.E. Golden Tips: History and Government

Moran Publishers

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

171

K.C.S.E. Golden Tips: Skills in Composition Writing

Moran Publishers

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

172

KCPE Golden Tips Science

Moran Publishers

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

173

KCPE Golden Tips Social Studies

Moran Publishers

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

174

KCPE Golden Tips: Mathematics

Moran Publishers

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

175

KCPE Golden Tips: Skills in Composition Writing

Moran Publishers

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

176

KCPE Golden Tips: Stadi za Uandishi wa Insha

Moran Publishers

Kenya

SHS

Swahili

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

177

Keynote English Pupil's Book 1

Various

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

Standard 1 English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

178

Keynote English Pupil's Book 2

Various

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

Standard 1 English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

179

Keynote English Pupil's Book 3

Various

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

Standard 1 English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

180

Kidnapped

Stevenson, Robert
Louis

HarperCollins UK

UK

181

Kids on Bikes

Atkinson, Hilary

Kidza Books

182

Kisa cha Mkulima, Mwanawe na Punda

Unspecified

Longhorn Publishers

183

Kisumu County Comprehensive Social Studies: Form 4

Longhorn Publishers

184

Kiswahili Mufti (Kenyan Kiswahili Textbook) Grade 2 (Swahili
Edition)

Wallah, Bin Wallah

185

Kiswahili Mufti (Kenyan Kiswahili Textbook) Grade 3 (Swahili
Edition)

186

Ndirangu, Joseph
Sanya, Abigail

SHS

English

Literary Works

South Africa A

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

Kenya

Swahili

Literary Works

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

Swahili

Literary Works

Wallah, Bin Wallah

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

Swahili

Literary Works

Kiswahili Reader 1: Vokali

Mwisho, Faith

Mountain Top Publishers
Ltd.

Kenya

A

English

Literary Works

187

Kiswahili Reader 10: Matunda

Mwisho, Faith

Mountain Top Publishers
Ltd.

Kenya

A

Swahili

Literary Works

188

Kiswahili Reader 11: Siku Yangu Shuleni

Mwisho, Faith

Mountain Top Publishers
Ltd.

Kenya

A

Swahili

Literary Works

189

Kiswahili Reader 3: Siku za Wiki

Mwisho, Faith

Mountain Top Publishers
Ltd.

Kenya

A

Swahili

Literary Works

190

Kiswahili Reader 4: Usafiri

Mwisho, Faith

Mountain Top Publishers
Ltd.

Kenya

A

Swahili

Literary Works

191

Kiswahili Reader 9: Familia

Mwisho, Faith

Mountain Top Publishers
Ltd.

Kenya

A

Swahili

Literary Works

192

Kitabu Changu Cha 123 Paka Rangi na Ujifunze

Imbeah, Paa Kwesi

Kasahorow Foundation

Kenya

A

Swahili

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

193

KLB Biology: SHS; Form 2

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

194

KLB Biology: SHS; Form 4

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

195

KLB Mathematics: SHS; Form 1

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

196

KLB Mathematics: SHS; Form 3

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

197

KLB Physics: SHS; Form 2

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

198

KLB Physics: SHS; Form 3

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

199

Knight at Dawn, The (Magic Tree House #2)

Random House Inc.

US

English

Literary Works

200

KSCE Revision: CRE

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

201

Kuwa Kijana: To Become a Young Man

Sommer, Marni

Grow and Know, Inc.

US

D

English

Reference

202

Leprechaun in Late Winter (Magic Tree House #43)

Osborne, Mary Pope

Random House Inc.

US

D

English

Literary Works

203

Let Me Tell You

Forde, Sarah

Storymoja

Kenya

F

English

Literary Works

204

Lion, Dog and Cat

Gathumbi, Agnes W.

Phoenix Publishers

Kenya

B

English

Literary Works

205

Lions at Lunchtime (Magic Tree House #11)

Osborne, Mary Pope

Random House Inc.

US

D

English

Literary Works

206

Little Thithinda and the Wind Game

Gatimi, Karimi

Storymoja

Kenya

A

English

Literary Works

207

Little Women

Alcott, Louisa May

Random House Inc.

US

F

English

Literary Works

208

Living Memories: Kenya's Untold Stories

Kags, Al

Storymoja

Kenya

F

English

Literary Works

209

Longhorn Secondary Agriculture: Form 2

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

210

Longhorn Secondary Biology: Form 1

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

211

Longhorn Secondary Biology: Form 2

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

212

Longhorn Secondary Chemistry: Form 2

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

213

Longhorn Secondary Physics: Form 1

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

214

Longhorn Secondary Physics: Form 2

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

215

Looking for Trouble

Higgs, Colleen

Modjaji Books

South Africa F

English

Literary Works

216

Lord Teach Us to Pray

US

English

Literary Works

217

Love and Friendship

Austen, Jane

Public Domain

US

F

English

Literary Works

218

Lunch with Charlotte

Berger, Leon

Grey Gecko Press, LLC

US

F

English

Nonfiction

Osborne, Mary Pope

B

D

Kenya

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

84

Count Title

Author

Publisher

Country

Reading
Level

Language Genre

219

Maafa Kijijini

Mwango, Mary

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

B

Swahili

Literary Works

220

Mansfield Park

Austen, Jane

Random House Inc.

US

F

English

Literary Works

221

Mapambano

Tanzania Educational
Publishers Ltd

Tanzania

Swahili

Literary Works

222

Mars

Bova, Ben

RosettaBooks

US

F

English

Literary Works

223

Mashairi ya Watoto Marobo tandarobo na nyinginezo

Buliva, Arthur

Kasahorow Foundation

Kenya

C

Swahili

Literary Works

224

Math Blender (A Free Puzzle Game for Kindle)

Amazon Digital
Services

Amazon Digital Services

US

B

English

Games

225

Mathematics: SHS; Form 4

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

226

Matilda

Dahl, Roald.

Puffin

UK

227

Maximising on your Retirement

Kiunga, Murori

Queenex Publishers Limited Kenya

228

Men of the Bible

229

Midnight on the Moon (Magic Tree House #8)

230

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

D

English

Literary Works

F

English

Literary Works

English

Literary Works

English

Literary Works

Public Domain

US

Random House Inc.

US

Milestones in History and Government: Form 1

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

231

Milestones in History and Government: Form 2

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

232

Moby Dick

Melville, Herman

Random House Inc.

US

F

English

Literary Works

233

Molly Moccasins -- Apples Are Awesome (Molly Moccasins
Adventure Story and Activity Books)

O'Toole, Victoria Ryan

Urban Fox Studios

US

B

English

Literary Works

234

Molly Moccasins -- Berry Delicious Day (Molly Moccasins
Adventure Story and Activity Books)

O'Toole, Victoria Ryan

Urban Fox Studios

US

B

English

Literary Works

235

Molly Moccasins -- Body Language (Molly Moccasins
Adventure Story and Activity Books)

O'Toole, Victoria Ryan

Urban Fox Studios

US

B

English

Literary Works

236

Molly Moccasins -- Cousin Kate (Molly Moccasins Adventure
Story and Activity Books)

O'Toole, Victoria Ryan

Urban Fox Studios

US

B

English

Literary Works

237

Molly Moccasins -- Favorite Word (Molly Moccasins Adventure O'Toole, Victoria Ryan
Story and Activity Books)

Urban Fox Studios

US

B

English

Literary Works

238

Molly Moccasins -- Hand-Me-Down Sweater (Molly
Moccasins Adventure Story and Activity Books)

O'Toole, Victoria Ryan

Urban Fox Studios

US

B

English

Literary Works

239

Monday with a Mad Genius (Magic Tree House #38)

Osborne, Mary Pope

Random House Inc.

US

D

English

Literary Works

240

Moonlight on the Magic Flute (Magic Tree House #41)

Osborne, Mary Pope

Random House Inc.

US

D

English

Literary Works

241

Moran Primary CRE: Pupil's Book 7

Wanaswa, Rosemary

Moran Publishers

Kenya

Standard 7 English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

242

Moran Primary Science: Pupil's Book 1

Muguti, Christopher

Moran Publishers

Kenya

Standard 1 English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

243

Moran Primary Science: Pupil's Book 6

Muguti, Christopher

Moran Publishers

Kenya

Standard 6 English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

244

Moran Primary Science: Pupil's Book 7

Muguti, Christopher

Moran Publishers

Kenya

Standard 7 English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

245

Moran Primary Science: Pupil's Book 8

Muguti, Christopher

Moran Publishers

Kenya

Standard 8 English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

246

Moran Social Studies 7

Sanya, Abigail 

Moran Publishers

Kenya

Standard 7 English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

247

Moran Social Studies 8

Sanya, Abigail

Moran Publishers

Kenya

Standard 8 English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

248

Mother Earth

Raubenheimer, Paula

Big Bug Books

South Africa B

English

Literary Works

249

Mothers & Other Monsters: Stories

Small Beer Press

US

English

Fiction

250

Mr Skip

HarperCollins UK

UK

English

Literary Works

251

Mti wa Ajabu

Moran Publishers

Kenya

Swahili

Literary Works

252

Mummies in the Morning (Magic Tree House #3)

Random House Inc.

US

English

Literary Works

253

Musiimbi's Shadow and other stories

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

English

Literary Works

254

Mutunga Na Ngewa Yake

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

Swahili

Literary Works

255

Mwanamke na Mawele: Kitabu cha 7

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

Swahili

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

256

My body parts

Ngure, Jane

The Jomo Kenyatta
Foundation

Kenya

B

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

257

My First Time: Stories of Sex and Sexuality from Women like
You

Thorpe, Jen (editor)

Modjaji Books

South Africa E

English

Literary Works

258

My Hat

Atkinson, Hilary

Kidza Books

South Africa A

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

259

Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome

Berens, E.M

Public Domain

US

English

Literary Works

260

Mzee Alfabeti

Tanzania Educational
Publishers Ltd

Tanzania

Swahili

Literary Works

261

Nala's Great Escape

Nyambura Kariuki,
Mary

The Jomo Kenyatta
Foundation

Kenya

C

English

Literary Works

262

Naomi in Her New School

Mzee Muleka, Joseph

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

D

English

Literary Works

263

Naughty Stories: The Bravest Kid I've Ever Known and Other
Naughty Stories for Good Boys and Girls

Hardie Grant Egmont

Australia

English

Fiction

264

Naughty Stories: The Girl With Death Breath and Other
Naughty Stories for Good Boys and Girls

Hardie Grant Egmont

UK

English

Literary Works

265

Never Say Never

Mugo, Anthony

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

E

English

Literary Works

266

New Integrated English: Students' Book 3

Gathumbi, Agnes W.

The Jomo Kenyatta
Foundation

Kenya

C

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

267

Night of the New Magicians (Magic Tree House #35)

Osborne, Mary Pope

Random House Inc.

US

D

English

Literary Works

268

Night of the Ninjas (Magic Tree House #5)

Osborne, Mary Pope

Random House Inc.

US

D

English

Literary Works

269

No Need to Lie

Schmid, Rolf Rainer

Moran Publishers

Kenya

E

English

Literary Works

270

Noma's Sand: A Tale from Lesotho

Asare, Meshack

Sub Saharan Publishers

Ghana

C

English

Literary Works

271

Of Human Bondage

Random House Inc.

US

English

Literary Works

Osborne, Mary Pope

Morpurgo, Michael
Osborne, Mary Pope

D

C
D

E

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

85

Count Title

Author

Publisher

Country

Reading
Level

Language Genre

272

Old Vulture and the Rainbow

Borboryoe, Joel

Step Publishers

Ghana

B

English

Literary Works

273

Oliver Twist

Dickens, Charles

Random House Inc.

US

F

English

Literary Works

274

On Safari

Raubenheimer, Paula

Big Bug Books

South Africa A

English

Literary Works

275

Operation Kamaliza

Katui, Munro

Phoenix Publishers

Kenya

E

English

Literary Works

276

Oral Literature in Africa

Finnegan, Ruth

Public Domain

US

E

English

Literary Works

277

Out and About (Shyness)

De Beezenac, Salem

icharacter

France

B

English

Literary Works

278

Palm Tree Parables: Inspirational stories and heart-warming
ideas for personal growth

Darmani, Lawrence

Step Publishers

Ghana

C

English

Literary Works

279

Pepela na Mto

Walibora, Ken

Phoenix Publishers

Kenya

D

Swahili

Literary Works

280

Persuasion

Austen, Jane

Random House Inc.

US

F

English

Literary Works

281

Peter and Wendy

Barrie, J.M.

Public Domain

US

E

English

Literary Works

282

Peter Pan

Barrie, J.M.

Random House Inc.

US

E

English

Literary Works

283

Pigo la Ujana

Muthusi, Bob

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

E

Swahili

Literary Works

284

Pili Pilipili

Phoenix Publishers

Kenya

Swahili

Literary Works

285

Pinocchio

Collodi, Carlo

HarperCollins UK

UK

English

Literary Works

286

Pirates Past Noon (Magic Tree House #4)

Osborne, Mary Pope

Random House Inc.

US

D

English

Literary Works

287

Pizza for Sam

Labatt, Mary

Canada

Canada

A

English

Literary Works

288

Poachers Beware!

Arensen, Shel

WordAlive Publishers

Kenya

D

English

Literary Works

289

Polar Bears Past Bedtime (Magic Tree House #12)

Osborne, Mary Pope

Random House Inc.

US

D

English

Literary Works

290

Pole Mzee Bonga

Nandwa, Rebecca

Single Education and
Publishers

Kenya

C

Swahili

Literary Works

291

Practical Grammar and Composition

Public Domain

US

English

Reference

292

Practical Tips for New Writers

Standford, Jan

Praski Publishing

UK

English

Reference

293

Pride and Prejudice

Austen, Jane

Random House Inc.

US

F

English

Literary Works

294

Primary CRE: Pupil's Book 8

Wanaswa, Rosemary

Moran Publishers

Kenya

Standard 8 English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

295

Prince and the Pauper, The

Twain, Mark

Random House Inc.

US

F

English

Literary Works

296

Professor Van Dusen: The Thinking Machine

JourneyForth Books

US

English

Literary Works

297

RBI Volume 2: Dragon's Triangle

Ripley's

Ripley's

US

E

English

Literary Works

298

RBI Volume 3: Running Wild

Ripley's

Ripley's

US

E

English

Literary Works

299

RBI Volume 4: Secrets Of The Deep

Ripley's

Ripley's

US

E

English

Literary Works

300

RBI Volume 5: Wings Of Fear

Ripley's

Ripley's

US

E

English

Literary Works

301

RBI Volume 6: Sub-Zero Survival

Ripley's

Ripley's

US

E

English

Literary Works

302

RBI Volume 7: Shock Horror

Ripley's

Ripley's

US

E

English

Literary Works

303

RBI Volume 8: The Lost Island

Ripley's

Ripley's

US

E

English

Literary Works

304

Reclaiming the L-Word: Sappho's Daughters Out in Africa

Diesel, Alleyn

Modjaji Books

South Africa F

English

Literary Works

305

Responsible Living: A Life Skills Education for Secondary
Schools; Students Book for Form 2

Wasike, Flora

The Jomo Kenyatta
Foundation

Kenya

SHS

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

306

Responsible Living: A Life Skills Education for Secondary
Schools; Students' Book for Form 1

The Jomo Kenyatta
Foundation

Kenya

SHS

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

307

Ripley's Believe It or Not!

Leroy, Robert

Ripley's

US

E

English

Literary Works

308

Ripley's Unbelievable Stories For Guys (USFG)

Ripley's

Ripley's

US

E

English

Literary Works

309

Ripleys RBI 01: A Scaly Tale

Ripley's

Ripley's

US

E

English

Literary Works

310

Sam's Snowy Day

Labatt, Mary

Canada

Canada

A

English

Literary Works

311

SAT Math

BrainMatrix Inc

BrainMatriX, Inc.

US

F

English

Reference

312

SAT Verbal

BrainMatrix Inc

BrainMatriX, Inc.

US

F

English

Reference

313

SAT Words

BrainMatrix Inc

BrainMatriX, Inc.

US

F

English

Reference

314

Scarlet Letter, The

Hawthorne, Nathaniel

Random House Inc.

US

F

English

Literary Works

315

Season of the Sandstorms (Magic Tree House #34)

Osborne, Mary Pope

Random House Inc.

US

D

English

Literary Works

316

Secondary Breakthrough Workbook Biology 2

Moran Publishers

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

317

Secondary Breakthrough Workbook Chemistry Form 3

Moran Publishers

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

318

Secondary CRE Students' Book Four

Gichaga, Shiprah N.

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

319

Secondary CRE Students' Book One

Gichaga, Shiprah N.

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

320

Secondary CRE Students' Book Three

Gichaga, Shiprah N.

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

321

Secondary CRE Students' Book Two

Gichaga, Shiprah N.

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

322

Secret Garden, The

Burnett, Frances
Hodgson

Random House Inc.

US

F

English

Literary Works

323

Sense and Sensibility

Austen, Jane

Random House Inc.

US

F

English

Literary Works

324

Shadow of wealth

Konadu, Asare S.

Adaex

Ghana

E

English

Literary Works

325

Shapes

Raubenheimer, Paula

Big Bug Books

South Africa A

English

Literary Works

326

Shark Wars

Altbacker, EJ

Penguin

US

D

English

Literary Works

327

Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Novels and Stories: Volumes
I and II: 1

Doyle, Arthur Conan

Random House Inc.

US

F

English

Literary Works

328

Shoeless Joe

Kinsella, W.P.

RosettaBooks

US

E

English

Literary Works

329

Shooting Snakes

Bodenstein, Maren

Modjaji Books

South Africa F

English

Literary Works

330

Shuffled Row (A Free Word Game for Kindle)

Amazon Digital
Services

Amazon Digital Services

US

English

Games

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

86

Count Title

Author

Publisher

Country

Tanzania Educational
Publishers Ltd

Tanzania

Reading
Level

331

Shughuli Za Kila Siku Za Anna

332

Sing Babylon

Botsotso Publishing

Kenya

333

Siri ya Sala

Kimunyi, Njiru

Phoenix Publishers

Kenya

B

334

Sitaki Iwe Siri

Matandura, Bitugi

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

C

335

Sitaki Nife!

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

336

Slaughterhouse Five

Vonnegut, Kurt

RosettaBooks

US

337

Sober Again: How I Beat Alcoholism after 20 Years of
Persistent Drinking

Njeri Mathu, Ann

The Jomo Kenyatta
Foundation

Kenya

338

Someday You'll Write

JourneyForth Books

US

339

Songs of Paradise

Ogoola, James

WordAlive Publishers

Kenya

F

340

Sophie and the Shadow Woods: The Bat Sprites (Book 6)

Chapman, Linda

HarperCollins UK

UK

341

Sophie and the Shadow Woods: The Goblin King (Book 1)

Chapman, Linda

HarperCollins UK

342

Sophie and the Shadow Woods: The Icicle Imps (Book 5)

Chapman, Linda

343

Sophie and the Shadow Woods: The Spider Gnomes (Book 3)

344

Language Genre
Swahili

Literary Works

English

Literary Works

Swahili

Literary Works

Swahili

Literary Works

Swahili

Literary Works

F

English

Literary Works

E

English

Literary Works

English

Literary Works

English

Literary Works

C

English

Literary Works

UK

C

English

Literary Works

HarperCollins UK

UK

C

English

Literary Works

Chapman, Linda

HarperCollins UK

UK

C

English

Literary Works

Sophie and the Shadow Woods:The Fog Bogarts (Book 4)

Chapman, Linda

HarperCollins UK

UK

C

English

Literary Works

345

Sophie and the Shadow Woods:The Swamp Boggles (Book 2)

Chapman, Linda

HarperCollins UK

UK

C

English

Literary Works

346

Sosu's Call

Asare, Meshack

Sub Saharan Publishers

Ghana

C

English

Literary Works

347

Space Scout: Gas Giant

Hardie Grant Egmont

Australia

D

English

Literary Works

348

Space Scout: The Brainiacs

Badger, H.

Hardie Grant Egmont

Australia

C

English

Literary Works

349

Space Scout: The Dark World

Badger, H.

Hardie Grant Egmont

Australia

C

English

Literary Works

350

Space Scout: The Kid Kingdom

Badger, H.

Hardie Grant Egmont

Australia

C

English

Literary Works

351

Splish Splosh

Atkinson, Hilary

Kidza Books

South Africa B

English

Literary Works

352

Stage Fright on a Summer Night (Magic Tree House #25)

Osborne, Mary Pope

Random House Inc.

US

D

English

Literary Works

353

Stop!

Raubenheimer, Paula

Big Bug Books

South Africa B

English

Literary Works

354

Streetwise

Chater, Patricia

Weaver

Ghana

D

English

Literary Works

355

Summer of the Sea Serpent (Magic Tree House #31)

Osborne, Mary Pope

Random House Inc.

US

D

English

Literary Works

356

Sungura ni mbaya

Various

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

B

Swahili

Literary Works

357

Sungura yuko Hapa

Various

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

B

Swahili

Literary Works

358

Sunset of the Sabertooth (Magic Tree House #7)

Osborne, Mary Pope

Random House Inc.

US

D

English

Literary Works

359

Swahili Idioms

Farsi, Shaaban Saleh

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

F

English
Literary Works
+ Swahili
(Bilingual)

360

Swahili Sayings

Farsi, Shaaban Saleh

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

F

English
Literary Works
+ Swahili
(Bilingual)

361

Swimming with Cobras

Smith, Rosemary

Modjaji Books

South Africa F

English

Literary Works

362

Swiss Family Robinson, The

Wyss, Johann David

Random House Inc.

US

E

English

Literary Works

363

Tale of Tamari

Chinodya, Shimmer

Weaver

Ghana

D

English

Literary Works

364

Tale of Two Cities, A

Dickens, Charles

Random House Inc.

US

F

English

Literary Works

365

Tales from My Motherland

Wasamba, Peter
(Editor)

The Jomo Kenyatta
Foundation

Kenya

E

English

Literary Works

366

Tales of Hope and Dreams - Countin' on a Miracle

Standford, George

Praski Publishing

UK

F

English

Literary Works

367

Tales of Hopes and Dreams - She's the One

Standford, George

Praski Publishing

UK

F

English

Literary Works

368

Tamaa Mbele Mauti Nyuma

Charo, Japhet

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

F

Swahili

Literary Works

369

Tata Mtukutu

Bakari, Ndugu Atibu W.

Single Education and
Publishers

Kenya

B

Swahili

Literary Works

370

Tawia Goes to Sea

Asare, Meshack

Sub Saharan Publishers

Ghana

B

English

Literary Works

371

Teaching of African Literature in Schools

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

372

Team Trinity

Snyckers, Fiona

Modjaji Books

South Africa E

English

Literary Works

373

Tell-Tale Heart, The

Poe, Edgar Allan

Random House Inc.

US

F

English

Literary Works

374

Thanksgiving on Thursday (Magic Tree House #27)

Osborne, Mary Pope

Random House Inc.

US

D

English

Literary Works

375

That Worked (Problem Solving)

De Beezenac, Salem

icharacter

France

B

English

Literary Works

376

The Accident

Raubenheimer, Paula

Big Bug Books

South Africa B

English

Literary Works

377

The Adventures of Jack Lime

Leck, James

Kids Can Press

Canada

C

English

Literary Works

378

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

Twain, Mark

Random House Inc.

US

F

English

Literary Works

379

The Africats

Rivers, Sue

Kidza Books

South Africa C

English

Literary Works

380

The Ant King: and Other Stories

Small Beer Press

US

English

Fiction

381

The Baboon Who Went to the Moon

Bush, John

Storytime Africa

South Africa B

English

Literary Works

382

The Ball on the Roof

Atkinson, Hilary

Kidza Books

South Africa A

English

Literary Works

383

The Baobabs of Tete

Unspecified

Sub Saharan

Ghana

E

English

Literary Works

384

The Big Rock

Baddoo, Barbara

Sam-Woode Ltd.

Ghana

C

English

Literary Works

385

The Bully

Raubenheimer, Paula

Big Bug Books

South Africa B

English

Literary Works

386

The Bungle in the Jungle

Storytime Africa

South Africa B

English

Literary Works

387

The Chittering Horror of the Ley House

Lackey, Lee

Grey Gecko Press, LLC

US

F

English

Literary Works

388

The Coldest Winter

Kristopher, Jason

Grey Gecko Press, LLC

US

F

English

Literary Works

389

The Coup Makers

Konadu, Asare S.

Adaex

Ghana

D

English

Literary Works

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

87

Count Title

Author

Publisher

Country

390

The Cruel King

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

391

The Dying of the Light: Interval

Kristopher, Jason

Grey Gecko Press, LLC

US

392

The Entrepreneurial Journey from Employment to Business

Kiunga, Murori

Queenex Publishers Limited Kenya

393

The Fish

Raubenheimer, Paula

394

The Food We Eat

395
396
397

Reading
Level

Language Genre
English

Literary Works

F

English

Literary Works

F

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

Big Bug Books

South Africa A

English

Literary Works

Ngure, Jane

The Jomo Kenyatta
Foundation

Kenya

B

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

The Further Adventures of Jack Lime

Leck, James

Kids Can Press

Canada

D

English

Literary Works

The Giraffe Who Got in a Knot

Bush, John

Storytime Africa

South Africa B

English

Literary Works

The Girl with the Magic Hands

Worldreader

US

English

Literary Works

398

The Golden Principles: Life and Leadership Lessons from a
Rescued Dog

Blooming Twig Books LLC

US

English

Literary Works

399

The Holy Bible - English Standard Version

Public Domain

US

English

Literary Works

400

The Holy Bible, English Standard Version

Crossway

US

English

Literary Works

401

The Horse and his Boy: The Chronicles of Narnia (3)

English

Literary Works

402

The Hunchback of Notre Dame

English

Literary Works

403

The Idiot

English

Fiction

404

The Incredible Adventures of Pisho Pencil

English

Literary Works

405

The Jungle Book

English

Literary Works

406

The Last Ginger

English

Literary Works

407

The Legend of Lightning Larry

English

Literary Works

408

The Lightbringers

Ritz, H.C.H

Grey Gecko Press, LLC

US

F

English

Literary Works

409

The Little Pink Frog

Raubenheimer, Paula

Big Bug Books

South Africa B

English

Literary Works

410

The Magic Goat

Asare, Meshack

Sub Saharan Publishers

Ghana

English

Literary Works

411

The Mysterious Island

Public Domain

US

English

Literary Works

412

The Narrow Path

Selormey, Francis

Adaex

Ghana

E

English

Literary Works

413

The Path of the Eagle

Matau, Lemi J.

The Jomo Kenyatta
Foundation

Kenya

F

English

Literary Works

414

The Peculiar Kenyan

Bindra, Sunny

Storymoja

Kenya

F

English

Literary Works

415

The Police in Our Life

Adaex Educational Publications

Ghana

English

Literary Works

416

The Pursuit of God

417

The Red Badge of Courage

Crane, Stephen

418

The Reunion

419

Crossway Bibles

F

US
Hugo, Victor
Mohan, Vaishnavi Ram
Kristopher, Jason

Random House Inc.

US

Random House Inc.

US

Storymoja

Kenya

Public Domain

US

Grey Gecko Press, LLC

US

F
C
F

US

B

US

English

Literary Works

US

F

English

Literary Works

Kibera Njanga, Leonard Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

F

English

Literary Works

The River and The Source

Ogola, Margaret A

Focus Publishers Ltd.

Kenya

E

English

Literary Works

420

The Seeds of Greatness

Kiunga, Murori

Queenex Publishers Limited Kenya

F

English

Literary Works

421

The Sign of the Four

Doyle, Arthur Conan

Public Domain

US

E

English

Literary Works

422

The Silver Chair: The Chronicles of Narnia (6)

HarperCollins UK

UK

English

Literary Works

423

The Souls of Black Folk

Du Bois, W.E.B.

Public Domain

US

F

English

Literary Works

424

The Tale of a Whale

Atkinson, Hilary

Kidza Books

South Africa C

English

Literary Works

425

The Tangi Bridge - Common Core Standards Lesson Plan

Zafari, KM

Zwoodle Books

US

E

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

426

The Tangi Bridge (a very short story)

Zafari, KM

Zwoodle Books

US

E

English

Literary Works

427

The Tears You'll Never Cry

Zafari, KM

Zwoodle Books

US

E

English

Literary Works

428

The Thin Line

Salafranca, Arja

Modjaji Books

South Africa F

English

Literary Works

429

The Warthog's Tail

Bush, John

Storytime Africa

South Africa B

English

Literary Works

430

The White Rat

Raubenheimer, Paula

Big Bug Books

South Africa A

English

Literary Works

431

The Winning Character: Succeeding Where Others Fail

Kiunga, Murori

Queenex Publishers Limited Kenya

F

English

Literary Works

432

The Winning Habits: Succeeding Where Others Fail

Kiunga, Murori

Queenex Publishers Limited Kenya

F

English

Literary Works

433

There's a Mouse in the House

English

Fiction

434

This is My Home

435

Random House Inc.

Self

US

Konadu, Asare S.

Adaex

Ghana

B

English

Literary Works

This Place I Call Home

Vandermerwe, Meg

Modjaji Books

South Africa F

English

Literary Works

436

Thread Words (A Free Word Game for Kindle)

Amazon Digital
Services

Amazon Digital Services

US

B

English

Games

437

Three Musketeers, The

Dumas, Alexandre

Random House Inc.

US

F

English

Literary Works

438

Tigers at Twilight (Magic Tree House #19)

Osborne, Mary Pope

Random House Inc.

US

D

English

Literary Works

439

To Build a Fire

London, Jack

Random House Inc.

US

F

English

Literary Works

440

To Saint Patrick

Imasuen, Eghosa

Kachifo Limited (Farafina)

Nigeria

E

English

Literary Works

441

TOEFL Words

BrainMatrix Inc

BrainMatriX, Inc.

US

F

English

Reference

442

Tomatoes for a Birthday

Kenya Literature Bureau

Kenya

English

Literary Works

443

Tonight on the Titanic (Magic Tree House #17)

Osborne, Mary Pope

Random House Inc.

US

D

English

Literary Works

444

Treasure Island

Stevenson, Robert
Louis

Random House Inc.

US

E

English

Literary Works

445

Turn Away Wrath: Meditations to Control Anger and Bitterness

JourneyForth Books

US

English

Literary Works

446

Turtle Trouble (Learning Honesty)

De Beezenac, Salem

icharacter

France

B

English

Literary Works

447

Twister on Tuesday (Magic Tree House #23)

Osborne, Mary Pope

Random House Inc.

US

D

English

Literary Works

448

Uhalifu Haulipi

Odera Omolo, Leo

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

E

Swahili

Literary Works

449

Undisciplined Heart

Katjavivi, Jane

Modjaji Books

South Africa F

English

Literary Works

450

Unyielding Hope: The Life and Times of Koitaleel Somoei

Phoenix

Kenya

English

Literary Works

E

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

88

Count Title

Author

Publisher

Country

Reading
Level

Language Genre

451

Vacation Under the Volcano (MTH #13)

Osborne, Mary Pope

Random House Inc.

US

D

English

Literary Works

452

Vangavanga Mpgia Hadithi

Mcharazo, Alli

Longhorn Publishers

Kenya

C

Swahili

Literary Works

453

Victims of circumstance

Konadu, Asare S.

Adaex

Ghana

D

English

Literary Works

454

Viking Ships at Sunrise (MTH #15)

Osborne, Mary Pope

Random House Inc.

US

D

English

Literary Works

455

Vipindi vya Maisha (Growth and Changes)

Sommer, Marni

Grow and Know, Inc.

US

B

English
Reference
+ Swahili
(Bilingual)

456

Vitendo vya Kihesabu kwa Shule za Awali

Tanzania Educational
Publishers Ltd

Tanzania

457

Wake Up!

Sam-Woode Ltd.

Ghana

458

Water is Life

Konadu, Asare S.

Adaex

Ghana

B

459

Wave, Wind and Blade (Tales from the Old Kingdom)

Kristopher, Jason

Grey Gecko Press, LLC

US

460

Weaverbird: Collection

Akin Adesokan

Kachifo Limited

Nigeria

461

West African Folk Tales

Worldreader

462

What Do I Know About My God?

463

What Do I See That Flies?

464

Swahili

Literary Works

English

Literary Works

English

Literary Works

F

English

Literary Works

F

English

Literary Works

Kenya

English

Literary Works

JourneyForth Books

US

English

Literary Works

Schermbrucker, Reviva

New Africa Books

South Africa A

English

Literary Works

What is Love? (Love and selflessness)

De Beezenac, Salem

icharacter

France

English

Literary Works

465

What Katie Did Next

Coolidge, Susan

HarperCollins UK

UK

English

Literary Works

466

Whatever Happened to Thomas J. Reynolds?

Kristopher, Jason

Grey Gecko Press, LLC

US

F

English

Literary Works

467

Where Do Light and Sound Come From?

Ngure, Jane

The Jomo Kenyatta
Foundation

Kenya

B

English

Textbooks and Teacher Guides

468

Where There Is No Doctor

Hesperian Health Guides

US

English

Reference

469

Whisper

Keighery, Chrissie

Hardie Grant Egmont

UK

E

English

Literary Works

470

Who Is Barack Obama?

Edwards, Roberta

Penguin

US

B

English

Literary Works

471

Who is Frances Rain?

Buffie, Margaret

Kids Can Press

US

D

English

Literary Works

472

Who Is Jane Goodall?

Edwards, Roberta

Penguin

US

C

English

Literary Works

473

Who Was Albert Einstein?

Brallier, Jess

Penguin

US

C

English

Literary Works

474

Who Was Ferdinand Magellan?

Kramer, S.A.

Penguin

US

C

English

Literary Works

475

Who Was Harriet Tubman?

Mcdonough, Zeldis

Penguin

US

C

English

Literary Works

476

Who Was King Tut?

Edwards, Roberta

Penguin

US

B

English

Literary Works

477

Who was Pablo Picasso?

Kelley, True

Penguin

US

B

English

Literary Works

478

Who was William Shakespeare?

Mannis, Celeste

Penguin

US

B

English

Literary Works

479

Who Will Cry When You Die?: Life Lessons From The Monk
Who Sold His Ferrari

HarperCollins Publishers
Ltd

US

English

Literary Works

480

Wimbo Wa Matatu The Matatu Song

Muchemi, Muthoni

Storymoja

Kenya

B

Swahili

Literary Works

481

Wolf, Wolf

Raubenheimer, Paula

Big Bug Books

South Africa A

English

Literary Works

482

Workplace

Muhoho, Njoki

Moran Publishers

Kenya

F

English

Literary Works

483

Writing Still

Staunton, Irene [ed.]

Weaver

Ghana

E

English

Literary Works

484

Wuthering Heights

Bronte, Emily

Random House Inc.

US

F

English

Literary Works

485

You're a bad man, Mr Gum

Stanton, Andy

Egmont UK Limited

UK

D

English

Literary Works

486

You're Born an Original: Don't Die a Copy!

Mason, John L.

WordAlive Publishers

Kenya

F

English

Literary Works

487

Zac Power Extreme Mission #1: Sand Storm

Morphew, Chris

Hardie Grant Egmont

Australia

C

English

Literary Works

488

Zac Power Extreme Mission #2: Dark Tower

Morphew, Chris

Hardie Grant Egmont

Australia

C

English

Literary Works

489

Zac Power Extreme Mission #3: Ice Patrol

Morphew, Chris

Hardie Grant Egmont

Australia

C

English

Literary Works

490

Zac Power Extreme Mission #4: Water Blaster

Morphew, Chris

Hardie Grant Egmont

Australia

C

English

Literary Works

491

Zac Power Extreme Missions: 4 Books in 1

Morphew, Chris

Hardie Grant Egmont

Australia

C

English

Literary Works

492

Zac Power Test Drive: Zac's Bank Bust

Hardie Grant Egmont

Australia

English

Fiction

493

Zac Power: Ultimate Mission

Miles, Chris

Hardie Grant Egmont

Australia

C

English

Literary Works

494

Zac Power: Volcanic Panic

Morphew, Chris

Hardie Grant Egmont

Australia

C

English

Literary Works

B

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

89

Appendix 4. Additional Patron Survey Data

Ease of using an e-reader

Ease of using an e-reader

70%

61%

60%
50%
40%
29%

30%

Percentage

20%
10%
0%

2%

0%

Blank

Very
Difficult

6%

2%
Difficult

Neither
easy nor
hard

Easy

Very easy

Did you find the content you were looking for?

Did you find the content you were
looking
•• Homescience and biology
•• Biographies
for ?
•• psychology, philosophy and music ralated

If NO, What material were you looking for?

90%

material

•• klb bioloogy book 4, klb homescience book 4
•• Geography book 1-4, Physics book 3 and 4
•• Drawing and design topics
•• Form 4 and 3 revision and course books
•• Novels
•• Ben carson books
•• High school revision text books
•• Journals
•• Accounting books
•• Hotel management and hospitality
•• Books on criminology and psychlogy
•• Braille books
•• KLB Secondary Physics andpercentage
Geography Book 1
•• Bible commentaries and other religion books
•• Journalism books

83%

80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%

14%

10%
0%

Yes

Sometimes

2%

1%

Blanks

No
Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

90

Patron feelings towards e-readers
Patron

feelings towards e-
readers

80%
67%

70%
60%
50%
40%

33%

Percentage

30%
20%
10%
0%

0%

0%

1%

Strongly
dislike

Dislike

neither like nor
dislike

Like

Strongly like

Have you recommended the ereader to a
Have youfriend
recommended
the ereader
to a friend or relative?
or relative?

13,49%

Yes
86,51%

No

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

91

Appendix 5. Additional Cost Information
It should be noted, these are average costs based on data from Project LEAP and other Worldreader projects.
They are subject to change and fluctuation based on the market and project approaches. The purpose of this
exercise is to show a) the full costs of different versions of our programs in a 3-year implementation period, and
b) the full range of cost per impacted (upper limit and lower limit). Here, full costs include all costs incurred by a
program, including costs to maintain the program in the field, regardless who’s the funder.
Assumptions
Number of libraries

1

Breakage/loss rate

Number of devices

35

Project managers per library

1

Number of titles per e-reader (Y1)

100

Number of people impacted per device

23

Number of additional titles per year, per e-reader (Y2 & Y3)

25

Stand alone project

Amount

0,03

Notes

Y1
1 BLUEBox

Customs clearance (Estimate, amount varies by country)
Lunch for librarian training (5 librarians/volunteers, 2 days)
Refreshments for community launch (100 people)
Charging station
Project Manager Salary
Misc costs (transport for outreach, phone credit, additional power for
charging devices)
Start-up Costs (Y1)
People Impacted

$6.500

Includes 35 Kindle Paperwhite Wifi with 100
ebooks per device (3,500 books total), all
hardware, chargers, cases & accessories

$350
$50,00
$100,00
$125
$3.000
$200
$10.325
805

Y2
Additional Content
Project Manager
Replacement Devices
Misc costs (transport for outreach, phone credit, additional power for
charging devices)
Y2 Cost
Additional People Impacted

$438

Assumes 25 additional titles per e-reader at .$50
per copy

$3.000
$63
$200
$3.701
201

Assumes a patron turnover rate of 25%

Y3
Additional Content
Project Manager
Replacement Devices
Misc costs (transport for outreach, phone credit, additional power for
charging devices)

Y3 Cost
Additional People Impacted
Total Cost
Total people impacted
Cost per person impacted
Value of content (per e-reader):
Value of content (across all devices)

$438

Assumes 25 additional titles per e-reader at .$50
per copy

$3.000
$63

Assumes an annual breakage/loss rate of 3.0%

$200

$3.501
201

Assumes a patron turnover rate of 25%

$17.526
1.208
$14,51

Across three years of implementation

$600
$21.000

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

92

Assumptions
Hardware+Case+Shipping (per device)
Customs at scale (per device)

$60 Number of libraries

200

$3 Devices per library

100

100 books (cost at scale)

$40 Program managers/ library

Service Fee (at scale)

$15 Replacement rate

Program manager salary

1
3%

$3.000 Number of libraries

Launch clusters
Annual patron turnover rate

200

5 People impacted/ device

23

25% Additional content (Y2 & Y3)

100

Total Cost: 20,000 devices
Devices

20.000,00

H/W

$1.260.000

Content

$800.000

Service Fee

$300.000

Partner Costs (Y1)

$678.000

Y2&Y3

$2.152.000

Subtotal

$5.210.000

Total Impacted

3.058.000,00

690.000

Cost per person Impacted

$8 Across 3 years of implementation

Cost per device

$261

Value of Content/Device

$800 Assumes retail value average of $4 per book

Total value of content

$16.000.000 Across 22,000 devices

Annual Breakdown of Costs
Launch
Y1
Y2&Y3

Charging
Station

$8.000 $30.000
$0 $0

Project Mgr Replace-ments

Add'l content

Misc

Total

$600.000

$0

$0

$40.000

$678.000

$1.200.000

$72.000

$800.000

$80.000

$2.152.000

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

93

Appendix 6. LEAP CASE STUDIES
Reading Tent at Sigalagala Market
While Shikalakala Primary School Community Library had great
success implementing e-reader programs among students and
teachers at Shikalakala Primary School, the library realized that
many people in the wider community did not realize that the
library and its services were available to them. Therefore, the
library pitched its first ever reading tent at Sigalagala Market
to spread awareness of the library. The tent attracted students
from more than 8 primary schools, Sigalagala Polytechnic, and
Masinde Muliro University. University students were fascinated by
the e-readers, and downloaded free books related to their fields
of study. The library also showed university students that they
could access digital books without e-readers by downloading the
free Worldreader Mobile application. The library intended that the
reading tent would be a half-day event; however, due to overwhelming interest, the tent was open for the entire day as people
encouraged friends and relatives to experience e-readers for
themselves. Community members recommended that the library
provide a bigger reading tent during school holidays to attract
more students to the library. Parents that with this new knowledge
of all the library had to offer, they certainly planned on taking their
children there more often.

Writing and Debate Program for Youth
in Kisumu Slums
In order to build youth’s language, leadership, problem solving,
and technology skills, Kisumu Public Library launched a
two-month writing and debate program that reached over
25 primary and secondary schools in slum areas. The debate
aspect of the program involved five students from each school
who represented different ministries in a county. Using e-readers
and computers, students researched their assigned counties and
then presented recommendations to “parliament.” The debates
were held at the American Corner, and the library used the VSee
application so that those at the American Embassy and Kenya
could stream the debates. Youth volunteers recruited from a short
course in journalism helped to manage the debates. The writing
aspect of the program provided students with an opportunity to
submit essays and stories, the best of which will be loaded onto
Kisumu Public Library’s e-readers, and possibly uploaded onto
Worldreader’s mobile app, which is available for free to readers
internationally.

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

94

Kakamega National Library Shares Books
with Students and Teachers
Mr. Fabian Lwangu, the head of the children’s section at
Kakamega National Library, estimates that since the launch of
the LEAP program, the number of children who regularly visit
the library has grown by more than 50%, adding, “We now have
regular patrons as young as eight years old who, instead of
staying home in the afternoon, prefer to come [to the library] and
read.” Due to increased interest in reading, schools neighboring the library have requested that the library bring e-readers to
their classes. When school closes at 3:45pm, students choose
to spend their free time at school using e-readers. The project
manager is impressed by how quiet and focused the students are
when they are reading from the e-readers, even after a long day
of school. Since there is a limited number of e-readers, students
don’t mind sharing, and sometimes up to four students share the
same device. Teachers also benefit from accessing the e-readers
alongside their students. An English teacher at Kakamega
Muslim Primary School shared that she had been having challenges teaching specific grammar, until she discovered the book
“Amazingly Easy Phrasal Verbs” on the e-reader, which sparked
new ideas.

Library Outreach: Sharing Books across Borders
Busia Community Library, an urban public library, is dedicated to
sharing the 5,000 digital books it received as part of the LEAP
project with less-resourced communities, including those in
neighboring Uganda. Busia Commuity Library partnered with Six
Community Library, a small library in rural Uganda, to implement a
reading camp serving students from three rural Ugandan primary
schools. Organizers observed that students were quickly absorbed
in reading from the e-readers. Adults in the community also came
to join the reading camp— two men downloaded free business
books to help them in their personal businesses, sharing that the
e-readers have motivated them to enroll in computer classes.

Student Profile: Joyce Scovia Anyango
Joyce Scovia Anyango, a class 8 student at Karapul Primary
School, regularly visits Siaya Community Library. Joyce’s mother,
a widow, cares for Joyce and her six siblings. Joyce says that
her mother is her role model because even when her family is
struggling, her mother always manages to meet their needs and
raise their school fees. Joyce aspires to become a pilot. She is
a top student at school and has qualified to enroll in a national

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

95

secondary school. Joyce shares, “e-readers have helped me,
since I don’t need to carry a large bag of books when I come to
do revision. All I need is a notebook and a pen, because it has a
variety of books essential for my reading.”

Siaya Community Library Starts a Weekend
E-Reading Program
After the launch of Project LEAP, Siaya Community Library experienced an unprecedented increase in the number of students
attending the library on Saturdays. In response, librarians created
the library’s first Saturday reading program, where students read
using the e-readers together with the guidance of trained teachers
who lead reading comprehension and vocabulary-building activities. Some students come as far away as seven kilometers to
attend the free program, encouraging their friends and neighbors
to attend as well. In addition to the weekend program, the library
also brings the e-readers to students’ schools on weekdays.

School Hires Vehicles to Bring Students
to Nyilima Community Library
A local member of parliament requested that Nyilima Community
Library reach all schools in his constituency with e-reader
programs. To facilitate transportation, one school located 15 kilometers away hires vans that drop off students in the morning and
pick them up in the evening, allowing students to spend an entire
day at the library.

Nyilima Community Library
Head teachers from different schools say that the e-readers
have helped build a reading culture in the schools and improve
their reading skills. For example, students ask for permission
to be excused to go to the library in the afternoons and at
game time. The students that visit the library are mainly primary
school students, with a number of secondary school students
also coming to the library almost every day. While before LEAP
students only came to the library during school hours, there is now
so much interest that the library has started conducting outreach
activities for students after school.

Project LEAP

Final Report - February 2015

96

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