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March 2006

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The Kohler Villager

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deeds, and county facilities such as the Old
Plank Road Trail and the Sheboygan Marsh
Park. District 18 covers the Village
of Kohler as well as Wards 5 and 7
of the Town of Sheboygan (see
map below).
Complete biographies of the
candidates appeared in the
February issue of The Kohler
Villager and can also be viewed on
the website at kohlervillager.com.
Sheboygan wards, while Dickert beat
Weeden 70 to 31 in the Village of
Kohler. Seven ballots had to be
photocopied and hand-counted
after Village of Kohler poll-
workers ran out of ballots.
The Sheboygan County
Board is a 34-member body in
charge of a $151 million annual
budget. (Approximately 27 per-
cent of each individual's prop-
erty tax bill in Kohler was allocated to
Sheboygan County in 2005.) Super-
visors are collectively responsible for
26 county departments and agencies,
which include highways, health care
centers, sheriff's department, register of
Published Monthly In Kohler, WI 53044 Volume 1, Number 8
Mar ch, 2006
Kohler
The
Villager
Villager
Kohler
PRSRT STD
U.S.POSTAGE
P A I D
KOHLER, WI 53044
PERMIT NO. 6
FREE
219 Church St., Kohler, WI 53044
Kenneth Conger and Eugene (Pat)
Weeden were the winners of the
February 21 primary election for District
18 county board supervisor. They will
move on to face off in the general elec-
tion to be held April 4.
In the only primary race of the 34
Sheboygan County
Board seats up for
election, residents
of District 18 gave
Conger 240 votes
and Weeden 102
votes. J eff Dickert
received 99 votes
eliminating himby just 3 votes. Weeden
beat Dickert 71 to 29 in the Town of
Conger, Weeden advance to
April ballot for county board
Sheboygan County
District 18 boundary
Kohl er resi dent
decl ares wri t e-
i n candi dacy f or
school board
Kohler resident
J imO’Donnell has
filed his declara-
tion of candidacy
as a write-in can-
didate for the
upcoming Kohler
Schools Board of
Education election
on April 4.
Incumbent J ane
Bishop has announced her candidacy for re-
election, but Tom Schnettler will not be
seeking another termand J imO’Donnell is
hoping to fill that vacancy.
The names of write-in candidates are not
pre-printed on a voter’s ballot. Instead, vot-
ers write the name of the write-in candidate
on a line provided, and mark a correspon-
ding circle.
O’Donnell, 69, moved to Kohler with
his wife J ackie in August of last year. They
relocated fromEllicott City, Maryland to be
closer to their children and grandchildren.
Their son, TomO'Donnell and his wife, J ill,
have lived and worked in Kohler for the last
15 years.
O’Donnell, a 1958 graduate of St.
J oseph's University, Philadelphia, Penn-
sylvania, also attended Graduate Business
Studies at Drexel University. He has held
management positions with companies in
three industries: metal manufacturing,
chemicals, and financial services. Before
retiring in 1996, he spent 25 years as an
executive in the securities industry with the
Midwest Stock Exchange in Chicago and
the NASD (National Association of
Securities Dealers) in Washington DC.
O'Donnell has served a total of 13 years
on two different school boards: three years
in Howard County, MD and 10 years in
Geneva, IL. He served as President of the
Geneva School Board for 4 years. Other
community service includes Maryland
Schools Insurance Funds: Chairman,
Howard County Mental Health Authority
Board; Vice Chairman, University System
of Maryland Chancellor's Advisory
Council; Advisory Board, J ohns Hopkins
University School of Continuing Studies.
O'Donnell currently serves as an
arbitrator for the securities industry (NASD
Dispute Resolution) and the American
Arbitration Association.
J im and his wife, J ackie, live at 335
Phillip Drive, Kohler and have 4 children
and 12 grandchildren.
Ken Conger
Pat Weeden
Katherine Delahunt, a Kohler resident and
practicing attorney, will be the first judge of
the city of Sheboygan and Village of
Kohler joint municipal court. Chosen from
among four candidates, Delahunt was
appointed by the mayor of Sheboygan and
confirmed by the City Council Monday
night. Her termwill run until April 2007,
after which the position will be an elected
K o h le r a tto rn e y/re sid e n t to se rve a s
ju d ge o n n e w m u n icip a l co u rt
one to be decided by Sheboygan and Kohler
voters. Delahunt was unanimously chosen
by the J oint Municipal Court Advisory
Committee, made up of Sheboygan Mayor
J uan Perez, Sheboygan Finance Director
Richard Gebhart and Kohler Police Chief
Bill Rutten. It’s expected that the court will
be ready to begin processing cases in April.
Having received her law degree from
the J ohn Marshall Law School in Chicago,
Delahunt was with the state attorney’s
office in Chicago and worked for a law
firmin Milwaukee. For the past eight years
she has been practicing law off and on, and
currently practices in Mequon and Kohler.
The Delahunts moved to Kohler about
18 months ago and have two children
currently attending Kohler Public Schools.
Kohler resident Donald Hillstrom checks in as the 150th voter at the Village Hall
2

MARCH, 2006

THE KOHL ER VI L L AGER kohlervillager.com
Villager
Kohler Kohler
Published 12 times yearly by
Terra Media, L.L.C.
©2005 The Kohler Villager -- All Rights Reserved
Printed by The Plymouth Review
Editor - Mary Struck
THE KOHLER VILLAGER
Terra Media, L.L.C.
219 Church St.
Kohler, WI 53044.
920-331-4904
Web: www.kohlervillager.com
E-mail: [email protected]
THE KOHLER VILLAGER welcomes contributions of news and photos of civic events
fromreaders. Editorial staff reserves the right to edit as necessary.
Advertising deadline: The 15th of each month (or call or e-mail if more time is need-
ed). Article deadlines: The 20th of each month.
The
Villager
For tickets call 920/459-3779.
All performances at Leslie W. J ohnson Theatre, 2820 Union Ave., Sheboygan
March 24, 25, 28, 29, 30, 31, April 1 at 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, March 26 at 2:00 p.m.
The Stefanie H. Weill Charitable Fund, Inc.
ACUITY and the ARTS
A zest y, ol d f ashi oned f ar ce wi t h out r ageous
char act er s doi ng madl y zany t hi ngs!
L
n
M
n
T
A
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Revisions to fence ordinance adopted by
village board
42 inches remains maximum height
With spring building projects just
around the corner, it’s time for an update
on a Village ordinance that was recently
changed. On December 19, 2005 and
February 20, 2006, the Kohler Village
Board voted to approve recommendations
from the Village Plan Commission to
repeal and recreate Sections 20.12.030, J .,
and 20,12.070, D., of the Municipal Code
of the Village of Kohler Regulating
Fences in residential and planned unit
development (PUD) districts. These
actions followed several months of
discussion by the plan commission and
two public hearings regarding how to
perhaps accommodate some of the
frequent requests fromhomeowners for
approval of fences that exceed the
ordinance’s 42-inch height maximumfor
fences without compromising the
“Garden Community” concept on which
the Village’s character and design is
based.
What did the previous ordinance say?
The previous ordinance, which had
been in effect since 1981, said that no
fence could exceed 42 inches in height
nor approach closer to a street than the
nearest line of a main building. Barbed
wire and electric fences were also
prohibited. There were no exceptions
specified in the ordinance, and although it
was possible to apply for a variance, they
were very rarely, if ever, granted.
What changes have been made to the
ordinance?
The ordinance retains the 42-inch
maximumheight and street approach, as
well as the prohibition against barbed
wire and electric fences, but now
specifies three instances where fences
that exceed 42 inches in height may be
approved by the plan commission: a) for
swimming pool safety and security, b) on
boundaries between a residential district
and a different zoning district, or c) for
agricultural purposes within a Residential
District.
The new ordinance language also
considers a new fence a structure that is
subject to the building permit application,
review, and approval process for
structures under Section 20.24. As such, a
survey “shall be submitted with all
building permit applications for the
construction of new fences. Fence
support posts or structures shall be
located on the owner’s side of the fence
so that the solid or ‘good side’ of the
fence is facing adjacent properties.”
Finally, the new ordinance includes a
clause related to fence maintenance:
“Maintenance of all fences shall be the
continuing obligation of the owner of the
property. Fences shall be painted or
stained neutral colors. Any broken, rotten,
or deteriorating boards or other fence
material shall be repaired or replaced.”
What about existing fences taller than
42 inches?
According to Village officials, fences
exceeding 42 inches in height that were
built prior to 1981 are grandfathered in
and allowed to remain. It has not yet been
made clear whether such fences, when
they deteriorate and need replacing, can
be replaced by an equally tall fence.
Section 20.08.100 of the Village Zoning
Code does, however, provide:
"Since it is the intent of this title to
preserve the past pattern of
development in the village, all lawful
nonconforming uses and structures
existing at the time of adoption or
amendment of the ordinance codified
in this title may be continued,
maintained and/or rebuilt, although
the use or structure does not conform
to the provisions of this title, …"
How does this change affect private
covenants between some homeowners
and Kohler Company?
An owner of a newer residence in the
Village, who may have signed private
covenants with Kohler Company, is
already restricted by these covenants
regarding fence construction. In such
cases, whichever is the more restrictive
of the two - the covenants or the Village
ordinance - will apply.
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APR 21·23 Championship Cup Series-Cycles
MAY 19·21 SVRA Spring Vintage Weekend
MAY 20 Family Tailgate Party
]UN 1·4 Suzuki Superbike Doubleheader (AMA)
]UN 3 AMA SuperMoto Pro Race
]UN 22·25 Kohler J SCCA Chicago Reglon ]une Sprints¹
]UL 7·9 Ferrari Challenge
]UL 13·16 Kohler lnternational Challenge with ßrian Redman
AUC 17·20 Cenerac 500 ALMS Sportscar Event
SEP 15·17 VSCDA Elkhart Lake Vintage Festival¹
SEP 22·24 Champ Car Crand Prix and OktoberFAST|
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the
kohlervillager.com MARCH, 2006

THE KOHL ER VI L L AGER

3
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The Kohler Police Department is currently
staffed by 7 full-time, and 3 part-time law
enforcement officers. Each month, an officer
will be featured in this section.
Officer Jarrod Fenner
Officer J arrod Fenner (also known as
“J .R.”) is a five-year veteran of the Kohler
Police Department. J arrod currently serves
as a part-time officer for the Village of
Kohler – as he is employed full-time as a
deputy sheriff with the Sheboygan County
Sheriff's Department, assigned to the night
shift.
J arrod began his law enforcement career
with KPD and still enjoys working in the
Village when his busy schedule permits.
In addition to being a State of Wisconsin
Certified Law Enforcement Officer, J arrod
is also certified by the State Department of
Health and Family Services as a medical
First Responder.
J arrod likes all type of sports. He is sin-
gle and greatly enjoys socializing with his
co-workers and friends.
J arrod was recently credited with saving
the lives of two young women. While
working as a deputy sheriff, J arrod was dis-
patched to an auto accident where a vehicle
struck several pedestrians in a tavern park-
ing lot. J arrod was the first unit to arrive on
the scene. Due to J arrod's training and
experience as a First Responder with the
KPD, he quickly triaged the victims and
realized the immediate need for specialized
trauma care. J arrod summoned a Flight for
Life helicopter and a ThedaStar helicopter
for two of the victims. J arrod’s quick and
accurate decision making contributed great-
ly to the victim’s survival.
Visit the Kohler Police Department website
at: www.kohlerpolice.com
Meet the officers
of the Kohler
Police Department
Kohler Police Officer Jarrod Fenner
4

MARCH, 2006

THE KOHL ER VI L L AGER kohlervillager.com
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To learn more, stop by our Welcome Center or give us a call.
Cedar Community is proud to team with Hillcrest Builders to bring an exciting new
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painted furniture
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handwoven baskets and rugs
artistic jewelry
bath & body
playful kids’ stuff
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Tre ating Ad ults, Kid s, C o up le s and Familie s-N o t D iagno sis
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Mark Twain Tonight has becomeoneof the
longest-running shows in theater history. To
see Hal Holbrook as Mark Twain is an
experience not be forgotten, and it is an
experienceyou will not want to miss.
Hal Holbrook adds to his Twain material
every year, editing and changing it to fit the
times. Twain trafficked in the absurdity of
human behavior, thedisorder that arises when
a selfish species seeks to advance itself
through well-meaning institutions like demo-
cratic government or religion. As aRapid City
J ournal columnist wrote, “Mark Twain
Tonight! was astudy in detail and someof the
best storytelling I’veever heard. It is amazing
what effect a well-timed pause can create.
Holbrook is amaster at engaging an audience.
Laughter was loud and plentiful but thehigh-
light of the evening was when Holbrook, as
Twain, gave us Huckleberry Finn. Taking on
theroles of Huck and J imin alternatedialogue,
Holbrook captured and translated arichness of
thesecharacters that gavemechills.”
Hal Holbrook performed his first solo as
Mark Twain at theLock Haven StateTeachers
Collegein Pennsylvaniain 1954. Thefollow-
ing year Holbrook performed his Mark Twain
character at anight club in Greenwich Village.
In 1959 Mr. Holbrook opened at atiny theatre
off-Broadway in New York. The State
Department sent him on a tour of Europe,
wherehebecamethefirst American dramatic
attraction to go behind theIron Curtain follow-
ing World War II. In 1966 he won a Tony
Award and a Drama Critics’ Circle Award.
Holbrook’s CBS television special, Mark
Twain Tonight!, was nominated for an Emmy
Award. Sincethen, Holbrook has appeared in
some 50 television movies and mini-series,
been nominated for 12 Emmys and won five.
Watch as Hal Holbrook becomes Mark Twain!
Theperformancewill beheld at theKohler
Memorial Theatre at 260 School Street in
Kohler at 7:00 p.m.
Ticket prices are$45/$35 and student tick-
et pricing at $15. Call for group rates.
Tickets may be ordered by calling 920-
458-1972.
The Kohler Foundation’s Distinguished
Guest Series is oneof thelongest-running per-
forming arts series in thestate.
Hal Holbrook bringing
Mark Twain performance
to Kohler on April 9th
Donate directly to
Hurricane Katrina
victims
The homes of 28 members of Christ
Lutheran Church in Pascagoula, Mississippi
weredestroyed or suffered considerabledam-
age during Hurricane Katrina. The church
itself was filled with 40 inches of water and
sewage.
Grace Lutheran Church of Haven has
arranged to have donations transported and
warehoused locally for thesedevastated fam-
ilies. They areasking fellow LCMS Churches
in Sheboygan County, along with areaorgan-
izations and businesses, to help fulfill alist of
needed, gently used items including kitchen
furniture, utensils and appliances, bed frames
and bedding, nursery furniture and bedroom
and living roomfurniture. Cash donations are
also appreciated to help with thecost of trans-
portation or to purchaseitems. Checks may be
madepayableto: GraceGives Hope.
A completelist of needed items and con-
tact information can be viewed by visiting
www.gracehaven.ws or by calling Leah
Heusterberg at 467-3566.
All items can be brought to The Store at
912 Madison Avenue (Hwy. 42) in Howards
Grove on Wednesday evenings from 6 - 9
p.m., and Saturday mornings from8 a.m. - 12
p.m. Donations will becollected until March
17th, when the truck will depart for
Pascagoula.
kohlervillager.com MARCH, 2006

THE KOHL ER VI L L AGER

5


459-2595 888-528-2595 www.kohlercu.com
5aukvllle · Kohler · Rowards Grove · Plymouth · 5heboygan
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Vi l l age of Kohl er Hi st ori c Phot o
Kohler Ice Carnival in 1927
Each month’s issue of
The Kohler Villager
features a historic
photo taken by Jacob
Kopf (and other
Kohler Company
photographers) as
well as free-lance
photographer Arthur
Schaaf.
Photos taken after
1974 are by Darryl
Gumm. A DVD
featuring all the
photos, accompanied
by piano music by
composer and
performer Vicky
Emerson, can be
purchased by calling
Darryl Gumm at 920-
254-6517, or by
visiting the website
at:
EssenceDVDs.com.
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Sheboygan, Wisconsin 53081

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MARCH, 2006

THE KOHL ER VI L L AGER kohlervillager.com
Now that we’re in the midst of tax season,
you may be anticipating a tax refund, if
you haven’t already received one. Of
course, not everyone receives a refund,
but, among those who do, the amount can
be sizable. In fact, in 2005, the average
tax refund was about $2,125. If you’re
going to get a refund, start planning now
on how to use it. By making the right
moves, you can help speed up your
progress toward your financial goals.
So, what should you do with your refund?
Here are a few ideas:
Put the money i n your IRA. To
achieve a comfortable retirement
lifestyle, you will need to draw on a vari-
ety of financial resources, one of which
may be an IRA. In 2006, you can con-
tribute up to $4,000 - or $5,000 if you
are 50 or older - to a traditional or Roth
IRA. So, if you received a $2,125
refund - last year’s average - you’d be
well on your way toward “maxing out”
on your IRA contribution. If you think
that this amount can’t really make that
much of a difference to your long-term
savings, consider this hypothetical situ-
ation: If you put that $2,125 in an IRA
that earned 7 percent a year, and you
never invested another dime in your
account, your money will still grow to
more than $16,000 in 30 years. Not a
fortune, to be sure, but nothing to scoff
at. And in all likelihood, you would not
just make a one-time contribution to an
IRA. (At the end of 30 years, you’d have
to pay taxes on your earnings, but by
then, you may be in a lower tax brack-
et; even if you’re not, you might be able
to spread the tax burden over several
years. And if you had invested in a Roth
IRA, your earnings will grow tax-free,
Financial Focus
Put Your Tax Refund to Work
provided you’ve had your account for at
least five years and you don’t begin
withdrawals until you are age 59-1/2.)
Keep in mind that these rates are hypo-
thetical only and do not reflect the rates
of any investment currently available.
Contribute to a Section 529 plan.
Many people contribute to Section 529
plans to save money for their children’s
(and grandchildren’s) college educa-
tion. You can put in large amounts each
year to a Section 529 plan, and your
earnings will grow tax-free, provided
withdrawals are used for qualified high-
er education expenses.
Pay down high-rate debt. Short-term
interest rates have been rising over the
past few months. This could mean that
you’ll be paying a higher rate on your
credit cards - which probably carried a
fairly high rate to begin with. If you use
some of your tax refund to whittle down
this debt, you’ll be making a wise
move, as this debt is typically not tax
deductible, and, therefore, of no bene-
fit to you.
Build up your “ rainy day” fund. You
might want to use your tax refund to
build your emergency fund. Generally
speaking, you should set aside six to
12 months’ worth of living expenses to
pay for expenses such as car repairs,
new appliances and unexpected med-
ical bills.
You can’t always count on a tax refund -
but when you get one, make the most out
of it. You’ll be glad you did.
Submitted by Brian Beeck, Edward Jones
Investment representative with offices at 509
Broadway Ave., Sheboygan Falls.
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Angela Fiorini, a freshman at Kohler High School, has been accepted to the Milwaukee
Ballet School’s Pre-Professional Summer Dance Program. On January 7th, Angela audi-
tioned at the Milwaukee Ballet studios, attending the first of twenty nation-wide auditions.
The Summer Intensive Program is a six-week residential course, open by audition only,
to pre-professional dancers
who have achieved an inter-
mediate to advanced level of
ballet technique, as well as
who have intensive pointe
experience. The program cul-
minates with a professionally
choreographed performance,
EMERGENCE, which fea-
tures the dance students.
Locally, Angela receives
her dance instruction from
Sue Darrow, of the Sue Dar-
row School of Dance in Ply-
mouth. She is also a member
of the Dancescape Ballet
Company, with whom she
most recently performed the
role of Clara in The Nut-
cracker, at the Stephanie
Weill Center for Performing
Arts.
kohlervillager.com MARCH, 2006

THE KOHLER VILLAGER

7
Kohler Resident to Attend
Milwaukee Ballet School’s Pre-
Professional Dance Program
Angela Fiorini performs the role of Clara, in The Nutcracker, at the Stephanie Weill Center for
Performing Arts.
Girls “gettin’ down” with their dads at the February “Date with Dad”event at the Village Hall
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Class tours Kohler Company
Mrs. Grossen’s Business Management class took a tour of the Kohler Company on
January 11. The tour consisted of the Pottery, Brass, and Foundry Departments. The
class observed production of toilets, sinks, and faucets and robotics in action!
The Kohler Public Schools Music
Department will be presenting two
concerts in March. The middle school
bands and choir will present a concert on
Tuesday, March 14, and the high school
band and choir will present a concert on
Monday, March 20. Both concerts begin at
7:30 p.m. in the Kohler Memorial Theatre.
The March 14th middle school concert
will begin with the middle school choir
performing a traditional spiritual “Sinner
Man,” and an Irish folk song “Rising of the
Moon.” The sixth grade band will perform
“Fanfare” and “Wyndham March,” and the
concert band will conclude the concert by
performing “Silver Star March,” “Portrait
of a Clown,” “Clouds,” and “Canto.”
There will be a unique twist to the high
Kohler Music Concerts to
be presented in March
school music concert. The theme of the
concert is entitled Inspired Visions. Most of
the music to be performed will create or
inspire some sort of imagery or vision. You
may even see some unexpected visions of
your own. Some of the selections you will
hear include “Neighbor’s Chorus,” “After A
Gentle Rain,” “The Cloths of Heaven,” and
“Masters of the Silent Screen.” There will
be some hidden surprises, so you will not
want to miss this concert.
The choirs are under the direction of
Lori Hucke and accompanist Wendy Kukla.
The bands are under the direction of
Richard Tengowski.
The concert is free and open to the
public.
8

MARCH, 2006

THE KOHLER VILLAGER kohlervillager.com
The Botanical Gardens
of Kohler
February/March
Calendar of Events
Herbs 101
Monday, March 6
7-8:30pm at The American Club
Presented by the Northeastern
Wisconsin Herb Society.
Learn the basics of easy-to-grow
herbs from our area including Mint,
Echinacea, Calendula, Lavender,
Chamomile and Garlic. Cost: $15
“The Welcoming Garden”
Lecture*
Thursday, March 9
6:30-7pm Champagne Reception
7-8pm lecture at The American Club
Garden designer, lecturer and writer
Gordon Hayward visits Kohler for this
lecture where he will discuss his latest
book and how you can develop a
welcoming front garden. Hayward’s
books will be available for purchase
and signing after the lecture.
Cost: $20 or bring a friend for $35
Renew Your Garden
Saturday, March 11
10-11:30am at Kohler
Design Center
Spring is a time of new beginnings,
Landscape Maintenance
Superintendent, Lisa Stubbe of
Landscape Artisans in Green Bay,
Wisconsin, will discuss ways to ensure
a successful growing season. Cost:
Complimentary
Tree Pruning
Friday, March 17
2-3pm at Kohler Gardener
Arborist Craig Kaiser of
Kohler Landscape will discuss
the importance of proper
pruning techniques.
Cost: $17
Gardening to
Attract Wildlife
Tuesday, March 21
6-7pm at The American Club
Kohler Landscape naturalist Deb
Denzer will discuss the needs of
Wisconsin wildlife and how to
attract wildlife to your landscape.
Cost: $20
Retaining Walls
Saturday, March 25
10-11am at Kohler Gardener
Dave Longmeyer of Kohler Landscape
will lead an outdoor workshop
demonstrating how to build retaining
walls using landscape timbers, stone
boulders and interlocking stone.
Cost: $13
We are pleased to present the following
programs and classes brought to you by The Botanical
Gardens of Kohler. Please call 800-344-2838 to register
for any of the programs listed below.
Educational Programs
Kohler Gardener is located at The Shops at Woodlake Kohler
765A Woodlake Rd., Kohler, Wisconsin
Please contact Kelly Boeldt at The Botanical Gardens of Kohler
920.803.3296 for membership information.
THE BOTANICAL GARDENS OF KOHLER
TOURS
Guided Nature Hike
Beginning 2-23-06 thru 3-30-06
Thursdays and Saturdays
10-11:30 or Noon, depending
on group size/questions, at
The American Club
Enjoy a guided nature walk in the Village of Kohler.
Learn to identify trees, birds and plants indigenous to Wisconsin.
Bring your binoculars, and our naturalist Deb Denzer will
assist you in proper usage.
Cost: $5 Botanical Garden Members, The American Club
and Inn on Woodlake guests $7 non-members
FUN-DAMENTALS FOR KIDS
Bird Identification for Kids
Saturday, March 18
1-2pm at Kohler Gardener
Kohler Landscape naturalist Deb Denzer will teach kids basic techniques
for identifying common birds in Wisconsin. Dress for the weather, and
bring binoculars if you have them. Ages 6-10 Cost: $9
Members of The Botanical Gardens of Kohler
receive a 20%-100% savings
on all classes, workshops, tours and lectures.
*Member savings do not apply.
124 Pine St., Sheboygan Falls

Phone 920-467-4011
The Villager
Famous For Friday Fish Frys Since 1968
Classic American Restaurant ~ Casual Atmosphere
~ Real Food For Real People ~
Open For Lunch: 11 a.m., Tue. - Fri.
Dinner: 4 p.m., Tue. - Sat.
Two party rooms available for your special events
Ask about discounts for school/sports related functions
Sunday Sit Down Breakfast Family Style Banquets
Legendary Desserts Great Vegetarian Dining
Kohler Kiwanis
selects its “Persons
of The Year”
Tom Schnettler accepts the Kohler Kiwanis Person Of The Year award presented by his son, Kale.
The Kohler Kiwanis selected Thomas
Schnettler and Janice Homiston as its “Per-
sons of The Year” during its January meet-
ing at the American Club. Tom was pre-
sented his award by his son Kale, and Jan’s
granddaughter, Shelby Homiston, presented
her grandmother the second award.
Janice Homiston accepts the Kohler Kiwanis Person Of The Year award from her granddaughter,
Shelby Homiston.
kohlervillager.com MARCH, 2006

THE KOHLER VILLAGER

9
CLASSIFIEDS
Milestones
Kohler Seniors
Seniors Meetings: First Monday of the month at 1:30 p.m., Kohler
Village Hall.
Kohler School Friends
Second Monday of the month at 11:15 p.m. in the Library.
Kohler Police Athletic League (KPAL)
Second Thursday of every month at the firehouse. Social time
begins at 7:00 p.m., meetings begin at 7:30 p.m.
Kohler Soccer Club
Second Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the library.
Meeting Dates
Share your milestones and announcements with
readers of The Kohler Villager!
Announcements and milestones are printed free of charge. Mail announcements and photos of weddings,
engagements, births, adoptions, reunions, promotions, classifieds, etc. to:
Terra Media, L.L.C., 219 Church St., Kohler, WI 53044.
A drop off box is located at above address, or e-mail [email protected],
or call 331-4904. Please include self-addressed stamped envelope to ensure return of photos.
Make checks out to Terra Media, L.L.C. Print and mail submission forms can be found on
kohlervillager.com.
Former Kohler grad wins ensemble contest
Joseph Stillwell has realized a dream he’s had since setting foot on the UW-Stevens Point campus:
winning the UWSP Wind Ensemble Composition Contest. As the winner, the band piece he wrote
will be premiered by UW-Steven Point's wind ensemble on Friday, March 3 at 7:30 p.m.
FOR RENT
Two-bedrm. brick duplex home in Kohler w/remodeled
bath, hardwood floors, newly carpeted stairway and
fresh paint throughout. All appliances, water, sewer and
private garage included. Non-smoker, pet owners
considered. Available now. $675. 803-8376.
RUMMAGE & BAKE SALE
Fri., March 10 & Sat., March 11 – First Congregational
UCC Church, 310 Bluff Ave., Sheboygan (across from
Vollrath Park) Fri.: 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; Sat. 8 a.m.-1 p.m.
Proceeds benefit Sheboygan Harbor Workcamp program.
Silent auction, baked goods, household and clothing.
State of the art medical and surgical facility opens
Drs. Andrew Campbell and
Aloys Tauscheck have opened a
new state-of-the-art medical and
surgical outpatient surgery center.
The Paragon Medical Center is lo-
cated at 1411 N. Taylor Drive in
Sheboygan. The Center offers a new
choice for patients requiring outpa-
tient surgery with state-of-the-art
operating suites and private admitting/recovery rooms.
Included in the $4 million, 23,000 square foot complex are Campbell Facial Plastic Surgery; Shoreline
Skin Specialists; Quintessa Medical Spa; Sheboygan Ear, Nose, and Throat; and the Paragon Surgical Cen-
ter.
Campbell Facial Plastic Surgery is headed by Dr. Andrew Campbell, a double board certified facial
plastic surgeon. He specializes in cosmetic and reconstructive surgery of the face, nose and eyelids.
Shoreline Skin Specialists, the dermatology practice of Dr. Aloys Tauscheck, offers the most modern
techniques available to treat all types of skin disorders.
Quintessa Medical Spa is the only local source for medical cosmetic services including customized
Botox, wrinkle fillers, laser treatments, intense pulsed light (IPL) treatments, permanent cosmetics, sever-
al lines of clinical skin care products, and camouflage makeup.
As part of Sheboygan Ear, Nose and Throat, Dr. Campbell treats diseases of the sinuses, nasal passages,
ears, tonsils, and vocal cords.
Watch for future ads in The Kohler Villager.
Mark S. Winkle Contractor
Licensed-Insured – Insulation Service, Walls & Attics,
Energy Efficient. Replacement Windows, Siding Service.
Financing Available. Residential - Commercial
920-458-0185
512 Ontario Ave., Sheboygan
Sports reward of excellence
presented to Kohler teen
Kaleigh Wenberg, a Kohler High School
senior, was awarded the Women’s Sports
Advocates of Wisconsin (WSAW) award of
excellence in February at the Four Pointes
Sheraton in Milwaukee. She was among 300
young women who received a plaque and
medal at the ceremony.
Kaleigh was recognized for her talents and
achievements in the areas of basketball and
tennis throughout her four-year high school
career.
Kaleigh Wenberg
2006 KOHLER VLLAGE DIRECTORIES
The 2006 Kohler Village Directories have been delivered in the
Village. If you did not receive a copy or need another copy, they are
available at the Village Hall.
If there are corrections or additions, please e-mail Jan Homiston at
[email protected]
10

MARCH, 2006

THE KOHLER VILLAGER kohlervillager.com
Sports
Sports
Kohler 5th grade girls
finish 19-1 season
Kohler 5th grade girls basketball team pictured left to right
Front row: Natalie Kukla, Jamie Henderson
Middle row: Abby Lee, Julia Mauer, Jessica Dyksterhouse, Katelyn Van Treeck
Back row: Coach Jim Kukla, Rachel Maggi, Kelly Burkart, Mari-Kathleen Marzano,
Karianna Heins, Kristina Kusel, Coach Rick Henderson
Not pictured: Elizabeth Falconer and Kelsey Wright
by McLean Bennett
As February rolls into March and the
boys’ and girls’ basketball seasons come to
a close, the Village of Kohler prepares it-
self for the upcoming spring athletic sea-
son.
And after the success of last year’s
spring athletic season, the students and res-
idents of Kohler have much to be hopeful
for. During the 2005 spring season, partic-
ipants from all three sports offered at
Kohler—track, golf, and boys’ tennis—ad-
vanced to their respective state tourna-
ments and placed surprisingly well.
Track
The track team is coming off one of the
most successful seasons in recent years,
having sent runners from both the girls’ and
the boys’ teams to the state tournament last
year.
Duane DuMez, now in his 26th year as
head coach of the boys’ and girls’ track
teams, stated that last year’s track team
marked one of the most successful seasons
in recent years. “We sent more runners
from both the girls’ and the boys’ track
teams to state last year than we have in re-
cent years,” DuMez remarked.
Last year, the boys’ 800-meter relay,
which consisted of Britten Wolf, Brendan
Huebner, Jim Buchanan, and Dominic
Fiorini, advanced to the state tournament
where they placed 8th overall. Brendan
Huebner also advanced to state individual-
ly for both the long jump and the triple
jump. Allison Holzwart and Erin Mueller
of the girls’ team each advanced to the state
tournament in the 1600-meter run.
“Over the past 25 years, there have only
been two or three seasons in which Kohler
hasn’t sent runners to compete in the state
tournament,” DuMez stated. However, the
boys’ track team hasn’t won a state cham-
pionship since 1979, and the girls’ track
team hasn’t won a championship since
1977. However, with the overwhelming
amount of talent on this year’s team, it
would be no surprise to anybody if Kohler
finally brought home a state championship
this year.
Tennis
Like the track team, the boys’ tennis
team is coming off one of the most success-
ful seasons in recent history; last season
saw the advancement of John Reinertsen,
Daniel Knabel, and Michael Garland to the
state tournament. Unlike the track team,
however, the tennis team will compete in a
much different conference and must be pre-
pared to face competition from much larg-
er schools.
Because the Central Lakeshore Confer-
ence (CLC) does not include tennis, the
Kohler tennis team must compete in the
Eastern Wisconsin Conference (EWC),
which includes some very large and com-
petitive schools. Included in the confer-
ence are Sheboygan Falls, Plymouth, Ke-
waunee, Kewaskum, Manitowoc Roncalli,
Two Rivers, and Chilton.
Despite the tough competition, Kohler
has been able to post some impressive vic-
tories in recent years and has frequently
come out in the upper half of the confer-
ence. In fact, the team took second place
last year in the EWC, falling just behind
Roncalli. “I think Kohler will probably be
one of the more dominant teams in the
EWC this season,” head coach Wendy
Tauschek stated.
The team rests its hope of success on its
three returning state contenders. John
Reinertsen tied for 7th place last year in
the state singles tournament, while part-
ners Michael Garland and Daniel Knabel
took 6th place together in the state doubles
tournament. The last tennis player from
Kohler to reach the state tournament was
Peter Knabel, who advanced to the tourna-
ment in 2001 but was eliminated during
the first round. To the best of Tauschek’s
knowledge, the Kohler tennis team has
never won a state championship, but this
year certainly offers a very good opportu-
nity for the tennis team to come away with
a championship.
Golf
The golf team may prove to be the
strongest and most promising team from
Kohler this spring. Like the track and ten-
nis teams, the golf team is coming off one
of its most successful seasons ever and
hopes to carry last year’s success to this
year.
Before last season, Kohler’s golf team
hadn’t won a conference title since 1977
and hadn’t gone to the state tournament
since 1989; in 2005, the golf team did
both. Head coach Dirk Willis, now in his
third year as the coach of the golf team,
contributed his team’s success to the “work
ethic that the Kohler golfers have exhibit-
ed over the past two years.” Following last
year’s trip to the state tournament, many of
the players began to work even harder to
improve their game; “If anything, their
success last year made them hungrier,”
Willis stated.
Adding to the team’s strength is the op-
portunity for the players to practice on
some of the nation’s top golf courses.
“The opportunity for Kohler’s golfers to
practice at Whistling Straits and Blackwolf
Run on a daily basis is very advanta-
geous,” Willis stated. “Being able to play
on some of the best golf courses in the
country helps give the players some extra
confidence when it comes time to play in
the state tournament,” he added.
Of course, Kohler doesn’t expect a free
ride to the state tournament this season;
Willis stated that the CLC will provide
some very tough competition this year.
“Elkhart Lake has their entire team return-
ing and has some very young talent,” he re-
marked. “Howards Grove also promises to
offer some tough competition this year.”
Despite the promising competition,
Willis maintained his confidence in his
team by stating his undeterred belief in his
players’ abilities; “all five of last year’s
state contenders have a very real chance at
making another run at the state champi-
onship this year,” he stated.
Spring athletic season
quickly approaching
PEPSI MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
PITCH, HIT & RUN
Hosted by Village of Kohler Recreation Department Baseball
Your road to the MLB All-Star Game starts here
Date: April 22 (rain date April 29)
Time: 11:00 am - 2:00 pm
Location: Ebben Field
Contact: Jim Tesmer 457-4722 or the Village Recreation Dept. 458-9726
PITCH, HIT & RUN provides youngsters across the country the opportunity to par-
ticipate in an exciting baseball skills competition. PHR is a FREE national program
that gives youth ages 7-14 the chance to showcase their baseball abilities.
The three basic skills tested in PHR:
Pitch: Throw pitches at a designated "Strike Zone" target (provided).
Hit: Hit from a stationary tee for distance and accuracy.
Run: Run from second base to home plate for time.
There are four levels of competition on the road to the Pitch, Hit & Run National Fi-
nals. Local Champions advance to a Sectional competition. Sectional Champions be-
come eligible for advancement to the Team Championship competitions hosted at
Major League Ballparks! Top performers from the Team Championship competitions
receive an all-expense paid trip to the National Finals. The National Finals will occur
during All-Star Week in Pittsburgh, PA.
Don't miss out on your chance at a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to compete on-field
at a Major League Ballpark! Top performers nationwide will win an all-expense paid
trip to the 2006 MLB All-Star Game in Pittsburgh, PA.
kohlervillager.com MARCH, 2006

THE KOHLER VILLAGER

11
Girls excel at gymnastics
meet – qualify for state
Kirsten: Vault 9.2 Third Place - Metal
Bars 8.3 Second Place - Metal
Beam 8.0 Third Place - Metal
All around - 33.25 - Second Place - Trophy
Davina: Vault 9.3 - First Place - Metal
Bars 7.6 - Third Place - Metal
Beam 8.6 - First Place - Metal
Floor - 8.8 First Place Metal
All Around - 34.3 - First Place Trophy
Davina Boykin and her friend, Kirsten Weinfuter qualified for state at the South
Wood County gymnastics meet held in Wisconsin Rapids. The state competition will
be held in Sheboygan on April 1st at the Sheboygan YMCA.
Davina’s father, David Boykin, works in the Casting and Finishing Department for
Kohler Company.
Both girls are age 9 and compete in Level 4. The following are their stats from the
meet in Wisconsin Rapids.
Sports
Sports
Kohler Bomber Jet
Athletic Apparel Sale
Fundraiser for
Kohler Girl Scout Troop 417
White Bomber Jet on Royal blue Hooded Sweatshirt
White ringer short sleeve T-shirt w/royal blue trim and
bomber jet
Royal blue mesh short with white bomber jet on lower
left corner
Royal blue sport pack with whit bomber jet
Forms can be picked up at school or call
Kathy Hillstrom at 208-7198
HAVE A SEAT!!!!!
Does your back get sore at those exciting
Basketball & Volleyball games?
Does your bottom get cold at those
track (it's coming soon), baseball, soccer and
football (yes, I said football) games?
If you said YES, we have a deal for you!!!
Royal Blue
Bleacher Seat with Back
Displaying the Bomber Logo
Sample on Display at the
Concession stand during home games
Price $20.00
Support your back
and
your Booster Club!
Available for sale at the concession stand or
by calling Lisa Bocchini 458-6674
Make checks payable to Kohler Booster Club
920-208-4664
100 Willow Creek Drive
Kohler, WI 53044
www.sports-core.com
DISCOVER
SPORTS CORE!
The best members, the best staff
and now the best equipment await you!
Sports Core believes in providing its members with the absolute “BEST” in
state-of-the-art exercise equipment. That’s why in March we’re adding $250,000
worth of major equipment upgrades and a sophisticated new workout atmosphere.
We invite you to schedule a tour of these exciting additions and see how Sports Core
can ft your ||fe. What`s more, rece|ve a comp||mentary guest pass for you and a fr|end
with a scheduled tour.
Upgrades include:
• State-of-the-art Life Fitness cardiovascular equipment
• New 2006 Life Fitness circuit training equipment to replace the 1998 Cybex
• New cable-based machines for personal training and Pilates
• Extensive free weight equipment for serious lifters
Mention this ad between March 6 and April 12, and get $120 off
the current enrollment fee when you join Sports Core!*
*Some restrictions apply.
1 2

MARCH, 2006

THE KOHL ER VI L L AGER kohlervillager.com
On February 2nd the State As-
sembly unanimously passed As-
sembly Bill 617, other-
wise known as the Can-
cer Protection Act, intro-
duced by Rep. Gunder-
son (R - Waterford).
This bill allows cancer
patients the opportunity
to participate in clinical
trials while ensuring rou-
tine care like chemother-
apy and radiation treat-
ments are covered by
their insurance. Currently 22
other states have similar legisla-
tion in place.
Clinical trials allow doctors to
test whether the latest treatment
options offer promising approach-
es to cancer prevention, diagnosis
and treatment in a safe and effec-
tive manner. There are typically
four different types of clinical tri-
als: treatment trials, prevention
trials, screening trials and quality
of life trials.
Treatment trials focus on find-
ing new treatments, whether it is a
new cancer drug, new approach or
method to therapy or new combi-
nation of treatments. Prevention
trials test new approaches to can-
cer such as testing vitamins, min-
erals, medicines or other supple-
ments to see if they will lower the
risk of cancer. These trials use
participants who are not diag-
nosed with cancer, as well as
those who have successfully
fought off cancer. Screening tri-
als test the best way to find cancer
in its early stages, while quality of
life trials explore ways to make
life more comfortable for cancer
patients.
Before participating in a cancer
clinical trial it is important to dis-
cuss your decision with your doc-
tor, family and friends. There are
potential risks when participating
in a clinical trial. Doctors do not
always know the side effects or
effectiveness associated with new
procedures or drugs. However,
participating in a cancer clinical
trial can be quite rewarding. Pa-
tients get to work with the top
physicians in cancer research and
get access to new drugs before
they are widely available. Pa-
tients also get the benefit of hav-
ing their health closely monitored
by top doctors.
In order to have a clinical trial
service qualify under this bill, the
Cancer protection act
The winter legislative session is in full swing and
dozens of bills are making
their way through both
houses of the State Legis-
lature. As your State
Senator, I believe it is im-
portant for me to provide
you with timely updates
on the legislative initia-
tives that are under con-
sideration by the State
Senate. Below, please
find a brief description of
the bill, an indication of my vote on each propos-
al and an update on its status in the overall leg-
islative process.
Senate Bill (SB) 414 – Fee Remission for chil-
dren and surviving spouses of ambulance
drivers, correctional officers, EMTs, fire fight-
ers and law enforcement officers – Extends full
remission of fees at the University of Wisconsin
Systemor at a technical college to the child or
surviving spouse of an ambulance driver, correc-
tional officer, emergency medical services tech-
nician, fire fighter, or law enforcement officer
who qualified for duty disability benefits and
later died fromthe disability. I co-authored and
voted for this bill and it is currently awaiting con-
sideration in the State Assembly.
SB 453 – Individual income tax check-off for
donations to the fire fighters memorial – Al-
lows a taxpayer to designate any amount of addi-
tional payment, or any amount of a refund due, to
the fire fighters memorial on his or her income
tax return. I voted for this bill and it is currently
awaiting consideration in the State Assembly.
Assembly Bill (AB) 802 – Federal Nursing
Home Dollars – Provides that if the state re-
ceives more federal Medical Assistance moneys
as matching funds to county and municipal nurs-
ing home operating deficits than anticipated in
the current budget, the state must disburse the ad-
ditional moneys to county and municipal nursing
homes. At this time, it is estimated that county
and municipal nursing home operations could
generate an additional $2.1 million in federal
funding. I authored this bill with Representative
Dan LeMahieu and it has been signed into law.
AB 728 – Witness Intimidation – Enhances
penalties for someone charged with a felony who
unlawfully intimidates a witness or a potential
witness in connection with a trial, proceeding, or
inquiry for that felony. I voted for this bill and it
is currently awaiting Governor J imDoyle’s con-
sideration.
SB 436 – College re-enrollment and registra-
tion priority of persons called into active mili-
tary service – Requires colleges and universities
to re-enroll a student who had been called to ac-
tive military duty and to give the student the
same priority in registering for courses that the
student would have received had he or she not
been called to active duty. I co-authored and
voted for this bill and it is currently awaiting con-
sideration in the State Assembly.
SB 441 – Organ donation – Streamlines and en-
hances the organ donation process in Wisconsin
so more individuals may benefit and fromthe
gift of life-saving organ donation. I co-authored
and voted for this bill and it is currently awaiting
Governor Doyle’s consideration.
AB 26 – Wildlife Violator Compact - Wiscon-
sin will join the 18-state violator compact which
says that if you have a hunting or fishing viola-
tion in any of the compact’s states, you cannot
hunt or fish in any of the states. I authored this
bill and it is currently awaiting Governor Doyle’s
consideration.
Winter Work
J oe Lei bham
Updates Fr om Our State Repr esentati ves
St at e Senat or
clinical trial must satisfy certain
criteria. The purpose and treat-
ment of the trial must
test whether the inter-
vention potentially im-
proves the trial partici-
pant's health outcome.
In addition, the trial
must have a therapeutic
intent and not be de-
signed to test toxicity.
In addition to the
above requirements the
clinical trial must also
meet one of the following require-
ments: test how to administer a
health care service; test responses
to a health care treatment; com-
pare the effectiveness of therapy
for the treatment of cancer with
other remedies; or study new uses
of medication.
Furthermore, the clinical trial
must be approved by one of the
following: the National Institute
of Health (or one of its coopera-
tive groups), the Federal Food and
Drug Administration, the U.S.
Department of Defense or the
U.S. Department of Veterans Af-
fairs.
The Senate version of the Can-
cer Protection Act, Senate Bill
288, passed the Senate on a voice
vote last November. I anticipate
within the next two months either
the Assembly version or Senate
version of this bill will be passed
by both Houses and sent to the
Governor for his approval. If
signed into law, this bill will
allow the 26,340 Wisconsin resi-
dents diagnosed with cancer
every year to receive access to
cancer clinical trials. These clini-
cal trials will offer hope for the
many patients who have not re-
sponded well to conventional
treatments, or simply want to try
the latest medication.
Unfortunately, I know all too
well the struggles cancer patients
go through. Right now there are
hundreds of cancer patients
around the state enrolled in clini-
cal trials. For many, this is their
best hope for recovery. I am
proud that Wisconsin is taking
steps to ensure cancer patients
will now be able to participate in
clinical trials knowing their rou-
tine care will be covered.
SB 501 – Frivolous lawsuit reform – Requires a
court to award a successful defendant the actual
costs of the action, including reasonable attorney
fees, if the court finds that the plaintiff’s action is
frivolous. I voted for this bill and it is currently
awaiting consideration in the State Assembly.
AB 383 – Government integrity with taxpayer
dollars – Provides that a state agency must con-
duct a criminal background investigation of any
individual seeking a position that requires that the
applicant have access to taxpayer funds. I voted
for this bill and it is currently awaiting Governor
Doyle’s consideration.
SB 525 – Funeral protest bill – Prohibit protests
within 500 feet of a funeral. I voted for this bill
and it is currently awaiting Governor Doyle’s con-
sideration.
AB 618 – Child safety seat bill – Require that
children fromfour to eight years old, weighing at
least 40 but not more than 80 pounds, and no more
than 57 inches tall must be properly restrained in a
child booster seat. I voted against this bill because
of the impracticality of implementing and enforc-
ing the provisions. Governor Doyle has signed the
bill into law.
AB 117 – Color of hunting clothing – Removes
the requirement that hunters must wear blaze or-
ange while hunting at night for other game during
the gun deer hunting season. I authored this bill
and it is currently awaiting Governor Doyle’s con-
sideration.
AB 657 – Eminent Domain – Addresses a flawed
decision of the U.S. Supreme Court by prohibiting
the condemnation of property that is not blighted
if the condemnor intends to sell or lease the prop-
erty to a private entity. I co-authored and voted for
this bill and it is currently awaiting consideration
in the State Assembly.
SB 477 – Licensing of midwives – Directs the
Department of Regulation and Licensing to devel-
op a systemto license nurse midwives in an effort
to ensure safe homebirths, which are becoming a
more and more frequent desire of expectant par-
ents. I voted for this bill and it is currently await-
ing Governor Doyle’s consideration.
SB 481 – Increasing the maximum Wisconsin
Higher Education Grant (WHEG) – Increases
the maximum WHEG grant amount to $3,000
(fromthe previous $2,500) for any academic year.
I voted for this bill and it is currently awaiting
Governor Doyle’s consideration.
SB 370 – Expansion of Academic Excellence
Higher Education Scholarship Program – Ex-
tends eligibility for a higher education scholarship
to a scholar enrolled in a two-year, full-time voca-
tional diploma program. I voted for this bill and it
is currently awaiting Governor Doyle’s considera-
tion.
If you would like additional information on any on
these proposals, please contact my office. Over
the next couple of weeks, I will provide you with
information on additional legislative proposals
that I have authored and supported in the Senate.
Again, I want you to be informed about my leg-
islative efforts. I would also like your input! If
you have questions, or concerns, regarding any of
the proposals detailed above, or if you have a pro-
posal that you would like me to consider, please
share your thoughts with me.
Contact Senator Leibham by calling 888-295-8750, or write P.O.
Box 7882, Madison, WI 53707-7882, or e-mail
[email protected] Visit on-line at: www.leibham-
senate.com.
Contact Rep. Van Akkerren by calling his office at
1-888-529-0026
E-mail: [email protected]
or write to: Rep. Terry Van Akkeren, P.O. Box
8953, Madison, WI 53708-8953
Ter r y Van Akker en
St at e Repr esent at i ve
kohlervillager.com MARCH, 2006

THE KOHL ER VI L L AGER

1 3
Mail or leave in drop box your
business card and $15 payment at:
Terra Media, L.L.C
219 Chruch St.
Kohler WI 53044
(Payment must accompany card.
Make checks payable to
Terra Media, L.L.C.
Busi ness Car d Cor ner
Busi ness Car d Cor ner
(920) 452-5696
Why Johnson Bank?
Our clients know that decisions are
made locally by people they know.
Your Wealth Management Team
Jon Dolson, a resident of the Sheboygan area, has joined Johnson Bank
as a Private Banking Officer. He’s teaming up with another Sheboygan
native, Mike Leibham, to offer a full range of financial solutions to
Johnson Bank clients in the Kohler and Sheboygan areas.
We invite you to stop in and introduce yourself to Jon at our Kohler
office or Mike at our Sheboygan office. They welcome the opportunity
to work with you to exceed your financial goals.
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johnsonbank.com
Member FDIC
Banking > Investments > Insurance > Trust
Banking • Asset Management
Insurance • Financial Planning • Tax & Estate Planning
FROM RECREATION DIRECTOR
SUSIE WANDSCHNEIDER
Looking for a Summer
job? The Recreation
Department will be ac-
cepting applications at
the Village Hall for the
following positions:
lifeguards, swim les-
son instructors, summer playground,
cheerleading camp, flag football, life-
guard manager. If you have any ques-
tions about any of these positions,
please call Susie at 458-9726.
The pool is undergoing
some wonderful up-
grades and will be
closed until May 1.
Thank you to Doug Boc-
chini, Ken Roeder and
Kyle Gebler for a won-
derful J unior Bomber
Basketball experience. All of the kids
had a great time and appreciate your
time. Three Cheers to You. Thank you
to all of the High School students that
helped with the camp. It cannot be
done without all of you.
Baseball News:
What's New: Pitch Hit
& Run Local Qualifying
sponsored by PEPSI
and MLB (also see
sports section in this
paper).
When: April 22, 11:00 - 2:00
Where: Ebben Field
Who: Boys & Girls ages 7-14 (see infor-
mation in this month's Kohler Villager).
Hot dogs, chips, PEPSI products…so
qualify & grab a lunch.
Registration forms for the Qualifying will
be available at the Kohler Youth Center
and Village Hall (Sponsored by the Vil-
lage of Kohler Recreation Department
Baseball).
Note: Volunteer parents or students
are needed to help with this event!
Contact Jim Tesmer at 457-4722 or
[email protected] for
information or to volunteer.
Noteworthy:
-The Kohler High School Gym will be
open March 4, 11 & 18, from 3-4:30 for
kids in grades 4-8 to work on baseball
skills and get a jump on the upcoming
season. Players should bring bats,
gloves and wear tennis shoes.
- Regi strati on forms for summer
2006 baseball are available at the Vil-
lage Hall & Youth Center. (Forms for
Bantam 1 & 2 and T-ball will be avail-
able in April.)
- Registration deadlines will be moved
up this year for all players currently in
grades 3-9. Registrations received de-
termine how many teams and which
leagues we will be participating in when
coaches go to the Lakeshore Baseball
and Lakeshore Pee Wee scheduling
meetings. Please meet these registra-
tion deadlines!
- Girls softball - we are currently looking
into options with area communities and
will be open to any suggestions that in-
terested parents/players can offer.
Wanted:
- Umpires! The addition of another team
will create more opportunities for um-
pires.
- Parent volunteers for coaching.
Dates to remember:
- March 14
Coaches meeting @ Village Hall - 6:30
All coaches from last year, those inter-
ested in coaching this year or anyone
interested in voicing opinions and sug-
gestions for the upcoming season are
invited.
- March 28Lakeshore BB League
Meeting @ Chissy's Pub -
7:00
- April 1 Regi strati on Deadl i ne!
Red & White Cadet
- April 22 PEPSI/MLB Pi tch Hi t &
Run @ Ebben Field - 11:00
- May 1 Regi strati on Deadl i ne!
Bantam 3rd & 4th
- May 2 Lakeshore BB Scheduling
Meeti ng i n Pl ymouth -
TBA
Links:
Lakeshore Baseball League
www.lakeshorebaseball.com
2006 Baseball Registration Bantam
¾, White & Red Cadet Baseball
Requirements:
Bantam 3/4 - currently in grade 3 or 4
(05/06 school year)
White Cadet 5 - currently in grade 5
(05/06 school year)
White Cadet 7 - currently in grade 6 or
7 (05/06 school year)
Red Cadet 9 - currently in grade 8 or 9
Fee: $25.00 for Village residents ---
$45.00 for non-residents
Registration Deadlines: Red & White
Cadet April 1, Bantam May 1.
Registration forms are available at the
Village Hall.
FROM PUBLIC WORKS SUPERIN-
TENDENT BRUCE NEERHOF
Snow Emergency: To find out if a snow
emergency is in effect for the Village,
call 459-3881 anytime, or watch Kohler
Cable Channel 20. There is no parking
on Village streets during a snow emer-
gency. A snow emergency is called
when accumulation is expected to ex-
ceed six inches. Snow emergencies are
typically called from 8:00 AM until 12:00
PM to give the snowplows an opportu-
nity to clear the streets with no cars in
the way.
Sand/salt: Village residents are wel-
come to obtain a sand-salt mix from
boxes located next to the Lost Woods
Park shelter.
Snow Removal:
Here are some reminders on Village
snow removal ordinances and policies:
1. Please remember to shovel your
sidewalks within 24 hours after a
snowfall event.
2. Do not blow or shovel snow back into
the street.
3. Please remove vehicles from the
street when the plows are in opera-
tion.
Snow Removal Around Kiosks: It is the
residents' responsibility to have the
snow removed around the
kiosks/NDCBU (neighborhood delivery
and collection box unit)/cluster boxes.
The Postal Service will not deliver mail
if the carrier is not able to reach the unit
- the front as well as the backside.
Someone in the unit/neighborhood
needs to take the initiative to remove
the snow; or maybe the responsibility
can be shared within the unit. The Vil-
lage is not responsible to keep these
areas clear of snow.
Clear Water Inspections: The Village of
Kohler is under directive from the DNR
to enforce state and village codes pro-
hibiting foundation drains and clearwa-
ter (such as sump pumps) from dis-
charging to the sanitary sewer. The Vil-
lage Building Inspector must perform an
inspection of the sump pump, floor
drains, etc. A typical inspection will take
approximately 15 minutes. Inspection
fees are paid directly to the building in-
spector, Pete Scheuerman.
If you are a new resident or will be mov-
ing out of the Village in the near future,
please be advised that before any prop-
erty is sold or transferred, a clearwater
inspection must be made per Village
Ordinance. Please contact the Building
Inspector, Pete Scheuerman, at 1-800-
590-2366 to arrange for an appoint-
ment. Please direct any questions
about the inspection or clear water re-
quirements to Pete Scheuerman.
FROM POLICE CHIEF BILL RUTTEN
www.kohlerpolice.com
New 8-Year-Old Booster Seat Law:
Governor Doyle recently signed the
new 8-year-old Booster Seat Law that
will go into effect J une 1, 2006. The law
requires children under 8 years old to
be in a booster seat, unless they are
over 80 pounds or taller than 4 ft. 9 in.
The law allows for one warning within
the first 6 months of when it goes into
effect. Police departments are required
to send their warnings to the State of
Wisconsin indicating who has already
received a warning. This law should
make the children in Wisconsin safer
while in vehicles. Many of the local
stores are currently out of these types
of seats, but many models can be pur-
chased on-line from those same retail-
ers for under $25, including delivery.
Vacation Checks: Don't forget that if
you are planning to go away on spring
break or at any time during the year,
that you may have the Kohler Police
Department check your house while
you are gone. Residents can now re-
quest a vacation check on-line through
the Kohler Police Department's web
page, www.kohlerpolice.com, by stop-
ping by the department or calling. If you
call outside of regular business hours
you may leave a message too. In your
message just include your name, ad-
dress, duration of your vacation and
VILLAGE NEWS www.kohlervillage.org
any other pertinent information that we
may need to know. Some pertinent in-
formation may include lights that are on
timers, alarms, and names of persons
that may stop by or key holders. Any
other questions about this service,
please call the police department.
Village Board Action during their J an-
uary 16, 2006, meeting:
Approved operators licenses as re-
quested.
Approved temporary Class B Beer Li-
censes to St. J ohn Evangelist Church
for 1/26/06 and KPAL for 2/19/06.
Approved November 2005 Revenue
& Expense Reports.
Approved sending a letter to Kohler
Co. requesting an easement in the ar-
boretum area to allow for installation
of 43" X 68" culverts under Woodland
Road.
Approved Atty. Mike Bauer and the
property committee to review the
"Pink Agreement" (Memorial Building
agreement between the Village and
the School) and additional agreement
from 1977.
Approved $500 for a video surveil-
lance camera for the theater area at
the Memorial Building.
Approved proposal from Virchow
Krause to perform a water rate study.
Approved the north/south interceptor
agreement with the City of Sheboy-
gan.
Approved Tom Leonhardt, J ohn Egan
and Bruce Neerhof to meet with the
Town of Sheboygan to negotiate a
new agreement regarding the
north/south interceptor.
Approved Bruce Neerhof, J ohn
Pethan and Susie Wandschneider to
complete a study of the operational
cost and use of the village pool.
Approved $900 for a networked com-
puter for the DPW lunchroom.
Approved Resolution No. 2005-19,
Rescinding Waiver of the Village of
Kohler's Extraterritorial Plat Approval
J urisdiction.
Authorized the Property committee to
investigate the cost to install and op-
erate air conditioning for the Memori-
al Theater.
Approved the Agreement of conflict
of interest arising out of Dual Repre-
sentation between the Village of
Kohler and the Town of Sheboygan
Sanitary District No. 2.
Approved the J oint Powers Agree-
ment with the Sheboygan County
Sheriff's Department required by Wis-
consin State Statute 146.67(9).
Approved the appointment of Bill Rut-
ten to the City of Sheboygan J oint
Municipal Court Advisory Committee.
Approved Tom Leonhardt's atten-
dance at a conference on levy limits
and municipal financing sponsored
by Ehlers & Associates, Inc.
1 4

MARCH, 2006

THE KOHL ER VI L L AGER kohlervillager.com


LIBRARY LINK
KOHLER PUBLIC LIBRARY
TAX FORMS
Tax forms are available at the library. Any
forms that are not on display can be
printed out for you so please ask at the cir-
culation desk for help. Federal forms can
be found at www.irs.gov and Wisconsin
State forms can be found at
http://www.dor.state.wi.us/html/formpub.ht
ml .
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Shannon Kring Biró
The Kohler Public Library is very pleased
to announce that Shannon Kring Biró will
speak here on Sunday, March 26 at 2pm.
Shannon is the creator, writer, executive
producer, and co-star of the national PBS
reality-cooking series The Kitchens of Biró
and is author of Biró—European-Inspired
Cuisine (Gibbs Smith 2005) and the forth-
coming Ó—SpanAsian Cuisine by Biró,
Johnsonville Big Taste Sausage Cookbook:
Over 100 Great Sausage and Brat Recipes
for On and Off the Grill (Broadway Books
2006).
An award-winning writer and public rela-
tions professional, Kring Biró has been
featured on NPR, in mainstream publica-
tions including TV Guide, Redbook,
Woman’s World, and Chicago Tribune, and
in restaurant trade publications including
Nation’s Restaurant News, Restaurant
Hospitality, and Chef Magazine. She has
written for Gastronomica: The Journal of
Food and Culture, TriathleteMagazine,
France Today, German Life, Silent Sports,
and many others.
Kring Biró is president of Biró OmniMe-
dia, LLC; Biró Culinary Schools, LLC;
Biró Restaurants, Inc.; and Biró Interna-
tionale Consultants. She was a finalist in
the 2004 Stevie Awards for Women Entre-
preneurs for her work in restaurant con-
sulting and is a frequent keynote speaker
at trade conferences nationwide.
Home Theatre System, LCD and Plasma
TV Workshop
Date: April 9, 2006
Time: 1:00 PM
Location: Kohler Public Library
Learn the latest on the entertainment tech-
nology that everyone is buzzing about .
Presentation followed by Q & A. Dave
Didier of Barthel Audio Visual will pres-
ent. More details to follow in the April
Villager.
Wisconsin Author Victoria Houston Talk
with Q & A
Date: April 30, 2006
Time: 2:00 PM
Location: Kohler Public Library
Victoria Houston is the author of the Loon
Lake Mystery series set in the
Minoqua/Rhinelander area. Come hear
how she backed into writing her successful
mystery series. More details to follow in
the April Villager.
Scrapbook Crops
Our first two Saturday crops went so well,
we’ve decided to make it a monthly thing.
All scrap bookers are welcome on the
third Saturday of every month from 11am-
4pm. Bring your own supplies and a few
dollars to chip in for lunch.
STORYHOUR:
Tuesday 6:45 PM - Repeated Thursday
10:00AM
Nursery rhymes, stories, fingerplays,
songs, guessing games and crafts.
March 2 – Dr. Seuss’ Birthday
March 7 & 9: Pet Show – Bring a stuffed
pet and we will have a judging contest
–Everyone a winner.
March 14 & 16: Wearin’ of the Green -
Feel free to be Irish
March 21 & 23: Spring is Springing
March 28 & 30: Bye – Spring Break
BOOK CLUB:
Good Wife Strikes Back by Elizabeth
Buchan
Date: March 20, 2006
Time: 7:00 PM
Place: Kohler Public Library
When Fanny, 23, first lays eyes on Will,
28, he is making a speech in his bid for a
seat in Parliament. They fall in love in-
stantly, and this latest novel by Buchan
(Revenge of the Middle-Aged Woman,
etc.) records the parallel 19-year trajecto-
ries of their marriage and Will’s political
career, the private and the public.
Life of Pi by Yann Martel is the book the
group picked to read for April 17.
Nancy Pearl’s 2
nd
Appeal – Character
Your comment that “the people (in the
book) were so real I knew them like my
own family” would indicate that you were
drawn into the book by the appeal of
“Character” according to Nancy Pearl.
Nancy mentioned that non-fiction books
are at times driven by the aspect of char-
acter and can be enjoyed every bit as much
as fiction. You may enjoy authors such as
Judy Piccoult, McCall Smith, Ann Rice,
Jan Karon, Barbara Kingsolver, Harper
Lee, Frank McCourt, J.K. Rowling, Anne
Tyler, Janet Evanovich and Sue Grafton if
you enjoy strong characters. Biographies
and memoirs are also types of books with a
strong character aspect. A book with a per-
son’s name in the title such as, A Prayer
for Owen Meany, is a good indication it is
character driven.
NEWMATERIALS: Please call 459-
2923 or email [email protected] if
you have suggestions of items to purchase
for the library.
FICTION
Entire Serge Storm Series by Tim Dorsey
Lost in a Good Book Fforde
Truth series by Mariah Stewart
Mary, Mary Patterson
Size 12 is Not Fat Cabot
Cat Who Dropped a Bombshell Braun
Arthur and George Barnes
5
th
Horseman Patterson
Gone Gardner
High Calling, 1940 Morris
The Hunt Club Lescroart
The Last Templar Khoury
Love and Other Impossible Pursuits Wald-
man
HOURS:
Monday-Thursday: 8am-8:30pm
Friday: 8am-8:30pm
Sunday 1-4pm
The library is open at 10am during spring
break! (March 27-31)
KOHLER PUBLIC LIBRARY LOCATION:
Kohler Public Library is housed with the
school library in the school building at
333 Upper Road.
Memory in Death Robb
Pale Horseman Cornwell
Gentlemen and Players Harris, Joanne
Carolina Isle Deveraux
Cell Stephen King
Witness Henderson
Marathon Winokur
NON-FICTION
Minnies: Quick Knits for babies and tod-
dlers
Knitters Handy Book of Patterns
30-minute Rubber Stamp Workshop
Tried & True Slow Cooker and
Casseroles
Total Money Makeover
The Knitting Answer Book
Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of
Abraham Lincoln
Internet for Dummies
Blogging for Dummies
PC’s for Dummies
End of the Spear
The Little Book that Beats the Market
Empire of Debt: the rise of an epic finan-
cial crisis
It’s All in your Head: thinking your way
to happiness
Physical: An American Checkup
Home Debbie Bliss
What to Eat: The ten things you really
need to know to eat well and healthy!
DVD
Doom
Elizabethtown
Just Like Heaven
Waiting
Wallace and Grommit and the Curse of
the Wererabbit
Proof
Stay
Zathura
Domino
North Country
Weather Man
Ice Harvest
Prime
kohlervillager.com MARCH, 2006

THE KOHLER VILLAGER

15
MooMoo & Scooba - Both males, neutered. A fun and dynamic duo who are brothers and
the the best of friends who want to go home together. MooMoo is friendly but independent
and Scooba loves attention.
Visit the Sheboygan County
Humane Society at:
3107 N. 20th St.
Sheboygan, Wi 53083
920-458-2012
www.MySCHS.com
Shelter hours:
Monday - Noon - 4:30p.m.
Tues.& Thurs., Noon - 6:30p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Noon - 4:30p.m.
Sat.& Sun. Noon - 4:00p.m.
Closed Sundays.
Pets of the month at the Sheboygan County Humane Society
- Photos by Pam Markelz
See these pets in color
at kohlervillager.com
16

MARCH, 2006

THE KOHLER VILLAGER kohlervillager.com
Destination Kohler Calendar of Events
Demonstration Kitchen Presentations
Saturdays through April - 10 a.m. & 2 p.m.
Located at The Shops at Woodlake Kohler
Destination Kohler chefs offer culinary presentations in this informal, working kitchen
designed to allow chefs and guests to interact throughout the demonstration. All sessions are
priced at $20 each, or attend with a companion at two for $35. Reservations requested;
(920) 457-8000. Ask for Demonstration Kitchen Reservations. Pending availability tickets
may be available at the door, day of event.
March 4 - Best of the Best Chocolate
Richard Palm, Pastry Chef
March 11 - ATaste of the Emerald Island
Sean McMullen, Wisconsin Room Chef
March 18 - Warmth of the Islands
Nicholas Arnold, Riverbend Chef
March 25 - One-Pot Wonders
Ulrich Koberstein, Executive Chef
April 1 - Breads and Cookies of The American Club
Doug Stieber, Head Baker
"Wine Wisdom" Wine Seminar Series
Located at Woodlake Market Atrium Café
Wine Wisdom is a four-week wine seminar series presented by Woodlake Market in partnership
with a regional wine specialist. All sessions are Tuesday evenings, March 7-28, from 6:00 -
7:30 p.m. in the Woodlake Market Atrium Café.
Admission is $5 per person. Limited seating. Visit the Woodlake Market Courtesy Desk to
purchase your tickets today.
Suds 'n' Tubs Beer Tasting
March 18, 2006 - 7-9 p.m.
Join us at the Kohler Design Center for an evening of beer sampling featuring selections from
around the world as well as food and live entertainment. Must be 21 or older to attend. Tickets
$25. Tickets available for purchase at Woodlake Market or by calling 800-344-2838.
Winemaker Dinner Series 2006
The American Club Executive Chef Ulrich Koberstein and a celebrated winemaker prepare an
evening featuring an hors d'oeuvres reception and a four-course menu paired with award winning
wines
$75 per person, inclusive of tax and gratuity. For reservations please call 1-800-344-2838. For a
description of each event please visit DestinationKohler.com
March 23 - Miner Family Vineyards
March 30 - Domaine Drouhin
April 6 - Michael David Vineyards
April 27 - Miguel Torres Winery
May 11 - Clos Du Val Winery
May 18 - Cakebread Cellars
May 25 - Steltzner Vineyards
Live Entertainment at the Horse & Plow
The Horse & Plow is proud to present live music throughout the year.
Saturday, March 7 - EZ Come EZ Go
Performance time from 9 p.m. - 1 a.m.
Spring Equinox Celebration
The spring equinox is one of the four great solar festivals of the year. Day and night are equal,
poised and balanced, but about to tip over on the side of light. The spring equinox is sacred to
dawn, youth, the morning star and the east. Just as the dawn is the time of new light, so the
vernal equinox is the time of new life. Come to the Sports Core on March 22 from 6-8 PM for
an evening of yoga and friendship: Poise, balance and youth optional; celebrating new life
mandatory. Attendance is complimentary for Sports Core members and $15 for guests. Advance
reservation is required by calling 457-4444. Please stop at the reception desk on the 22nd for
directions to the class.
Whistling Straits - New Lunch Offering
As of March 1st, the Restaurant at Whistling Straits offers a lunch buffet weekdays for $9 in
addition to their menu items and specials.
Cucina For Families
Family-Style Pasta. Sundays from Noon to 5 p.m.
Garlic bread, house salad and pasta served family-style. Pastas include traditional classics with
a twist, signature stuffed pastas and new dishes to discover. $12 for adults, $7 for kids 6-12,
kids 5 and under are free.
Pizza Night
Tuesdays from 5 - 9 p.m.
12-inch pizza for under $12. Choose from four types of rustic hand-tossed pizza. Includes kid-
friendly varieties. Pizza-to-Go is available.
*Full menu is available on Family Nights
Intentions offers Hands on Healing Energy
Hands on Healing Energy joins Intentions to offer alternative healing services including Reiki
services exclusively at a private office located inside the shop. Shoppers are able to receive
Reiki sessions from John Oestreicher, owner of Hands on Healing, either through appointments
or on a walk-in basis.
Visit www.intentionsonline.com for a complete calendar of events.
Special appearances by Melinda Myers,
horticulturalist, certified arborist, author and
television host, will be held at 1 p.m. on
Saturday and Sunday in the Appley Theater.
Myers is most known as the host of Great
Lakes Gardener as seen on PBS and The Plant
Doctor. Book signing opportunities will follow
each seminar and admission is $20 per person,
per day for each of the seminars:
ANNUAL EVENT CONTINUES TO
BLOSSOM IN KOHLER
SPRING GARDEN MARKET SCHEDULED FOR APRIL 1st & 2nd
Maximize Your Enjoyment in a Small
Space Garden
Saturday, April 1 at 1 p.m.
Creating entertaining and meditation areas
in your garden.
Creating A Colorful Garden
Sunday, April 2 at 1 p.m.
Look for new opportunities to incorporate
color, form and year round interest in your
landscape by adding vertical accents, new
plant combinations and plants with added
value.
Daily admission to the Spring Garden
Market is $5 for adults and $2 for children 12
and under. Show hours are Saturday from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. Please know that strollers are not
permitted in the showrooms. Visit
DestinationKohler.com for complete event
details.
Special Event Packages Offered - Invite Your
Family & Friends
Garden Party Package is available that
includes overnight accommodations for two
guests in a standard room at The American
Club on Friday, March 31. The event package
includes an evening reception starting at 7 p.m.
at The Shops at Woodlake Kohler, admission
for two at the Demonstration Kitchen program
on Saturday. Complimentary admissions to the
Spring Garden Market for two guests, a 20%
discount coupon for the Kohler Gardener and a
special gift are also included. This package
starts at $325 plus tax. A Saturday night stay
may be added to this package for $189 plus tax.
*Package limited to 40 guests.
A Spring Garden Market Package at The
American Club is available that includes
accommodations for two guests for two nights.
This package includes breakfast for two in The
Wisconsin Room on Saturday and Sunday with
complimentary admission to the Spring Garden
Market. Package price starts at $395 plus tax.
The Village of Kohler, recently accredited
as a botanic garden community, is the perfect
place to celebrate spring: the season of gar-
dening. The annual Spring Garden Market will
be held on Saturday and Sunday, April 1 & 2,
at The American Club resort-hotel.
During this year's Spring Garden Market,
visitors will take advantage of gardening
seminars, garden tours and the opportunity to
purchase the season's first hardy annuals, herbs,
bulbs or perennials. Merchants display one-of-
a-kind items for the yard, garden and home.
Sports
Core gets
a Makeover
Highlights of the
new environment
at the Salon at
Sports Core.
Melinda Myers, horticulturalist, certified arborist, au-
thor and television host, is this year's special guest at
the Spring Garden Market at The American Club.

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