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Preparation Guide for Your Mission Trip

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V O L U N T EE E E R S I N M I S SI O N S I N T E R N A T I O N A L

PREPARATION GUIDE  In te rn a ti  In tio o na l  issi  i ssio o n Bo a rd  S O U T H E R N

B A P TI S T

C O N V E N TI O N

 

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Table of Contents

TOC

LISTINGS BY INSERT NUMBER 1

1A 2

3

4

5

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N e v e r t h e Sa m e Doing Your Part

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Mon Moneey:W he herre Will It Com Comee FFrrom om?? Ways to Make Your Financial Needs Known

The Big Picture

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DIdeas et etai ailsls,for, DFinancial et etai ailsls,, an anddSupport Mo More re Det etai ailsls!! (Includes Passpo Passport, rt, Visa, Immunizations, Emergency Information, Checklist, and Financial Financial Arrangements)

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Do Don’ n’tt Forg Forget et YYou ourr Too Toothb thbru rush sh!! W hat to Pack (che (checklist) cklist)

The The In Indig digen enou ouss Pr Princ incip iple le in Mis Missision onss The Pow e r of Pr Pray eerr 10 W ays YYour our CChurch, hurch, Family and Friends CCan an Support YYou ou Spirit irituual Read adin ineess Tips for Spiritual Readiness 30-Day Spiritual Preparation

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Hos osppital italitity:Th y:Thin inkk Ah Ahea eadd Gift Ideas for Missionaries

Pray e r W aall k i n g Suggestions for Prayer

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You ourr Spi Spiriritu tual al Jou Journ rneey

Prayer Walking Resou Resources rces

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CStreet-Smart ommo mmon-S n-Seens nse e Sa(Do’s/Don’ts) fe fety ty Tips

Sha hariring ng You ourr TTes estim timon onyy Sharing Your Your Te Testimony stimony (Do’ss// Don’ts) Helpful Resources

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Other Cultu ultures res:: Differe Different nt is Not Nec Necess essari arilyly Ba Badd

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B ack Ho Ho m ee:: Now W h aatt ? W ays YYou ou Can Share Wit h Others

M y Test i m ony

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TOC

Never the Same



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saw the most hideous face I had ever  seen,” said Southern Baptist volunteer   Jack  Ja ck Hin Hintton on a miss issio ion ns trip to the Caribbean island of Tobago. He was

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leading music for a worship service at a leper colony.

Rather than selecting hymns himself,

the pastor from New Bern, N.C., asked the lepers to request their favorite songs. When the time came for one last song, a woman who had been sitting with her  back toward the pulpit turned around. The woman’s nose and ears were entirely gone. Her lips had almost rotted away. “She lifted a fingerless hand in the air  and asked, ‘Can we sing Count Your Many Blessings?’” Overcome with emotion, Hinton had to leave the service. Another volunteer followed him out to console him. “Jack,” he said, “I guess you’ll never be able to sing that song again, will you?”  “Oh yes I will,” Hinton responded. “But I’ll never sing it the same way again.”  VOLUNTEERS IN MISSIONS INTERNATIONAL

 

Top left: Pastor JJack ack H Hiinton in his his study at Tabernacl rnacle e Bapti tis st Church Church in New Bern, N.C N.C.. Top ri rig ght: The hand of a leper duri during ng a worship servi service ce at a leper colony col ony. Above Above: Church Church llea eader Abraham Ibi Ibitoye toye continueshis fan-making craft while while visiti siting ngwi with th Cecil Cecilia Oybola, whose mother is also a victim victim of H Hans ansen’s di dise sease— e—better better known as lleprosy eprosy.

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our volunteer experience may not be quite this dramatic. But just like Jack Hinton, you, too, will never be the same again. You will be changed because of what you experience.  You  You will see the wor world as it is is—t —th he needs, tth he heartache, the pain—and as it can be through the hope and love of Jesus Christ.

through the International Mission Board, formerly known as the Foreign Mission Board. Volunteers, according to a recent IMB annual report, “take part in partnership evangelism and missions, evangelistic crusades and ministries. They work in community health, hunger and relief projects and disaster response. They construct churches, dig wells, cook

Other members of your church will never be the same again, either. Their eyes will be opened to the world around them through your missions trip.  The  Th ey will have own ownership in you ourr experie ien nce because they invested so much of themselves in supporting you. Your excitement will become their excitement! Your love of missions will become their love of missions. In recent years more than 15,000 short-term volunteers like you have gone overseas annually

meals, repair Baptist facilities and equipment and serve as jacks-of-all-trades. They perform as physicians, nurses, dentists, veterinarians, agriculturists, medical educators and paramedics. They teach English. They help with discipleship training, leadership conferences, stewardship promotion, church planting and preaching.”  You  You have respond onded to the cha challen llenge of volu olun nteering overseas, like those who have gone before you. Congratulations! You won’t regret it!

Ginger Brow Brown, n, a Southern Baptist dental hygienist, vol voluntee unteers her services rvices to cl clean ean the teeth of a young patient in Punto Fijo, Venezuela.

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Doing Your Part

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ow let’s take a minute to talk about your part in missions. God loves all people and wants them to know Jesus Christ as their personal Savior. Jesus gave the Great Commission to His apostles in Matthew 28:18-20 (NIV). “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me.  The  Th erefor ore e go and make dis iscip ciple les s of all nations, baptizing them in the name of  the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.”  Th  The Gr Gre eat Com Commis iss sion ion was not give iven on only ly to the apostles. It It was given to every believer believer a and nd every church. It was given to you! You have the responsibility to tell others about your faith, to share with them how Jesus Christ is working in your life. Your denomination natio n and mission b boards oards serve only only as the channel through which missionaries and volunteers like your-

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se sellf Jer can can nt  Je rrybe Rase nk in, inand , presupported. side ident of the In Intternation ional Mission Board*, says, “We are grateful for the faithful, cooperative support of Southern Baptists who work together toget her so that almost 4,200 missionari missionaries es are are able to fulfill God’s call through the International Mission Board. They are sustained by cooperative prayer support. They are able to proclaim the gospel in the whole world because of the financial support provided through cooperative giving. They (volunteers) go, more than 15,000 strong, to cooperate in volunteer projects each year.” But volunteers will never replace the career missionary. Volunteers like yourself simply enhance the effectiveness of the career missionary by serving as a vital part of the missionary’s field strategy. Many times volunteers provide a platform for the missionary to penetrate a new people group or new level of the society in which he’s working. Volunteers respond to God’s activity around the world.  The  Th ey are “calle called d” and “specia cially lly equipp ipped” to pe perform the task at hand.

Southern Baptist volunteer Lil Lilli lian an Granberry helps to fit fit a young pati tient ent wi with th his his new glasses.

*The Foreign Mission Board’s name was changed to International Mission Board in in 1997 as part of the Southern Baptist Convention’s Convention’s restructurin restructuring g plan.

VOLUNTEERS IN MISSIONS INTERNATIONAL

 

The Big Picture

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our missionaries have lived and minis tered overseas, in some cases, for decades. They understand the “big picture” of missions. Every project, every ministry, every person, every relationship is a small piece of the missions picture. Those small pieces then fit together in just the right way to form the big picture.  You  Yourr ove overseas experie ien nce will be on one e important piece of that picture. Your role is to serve and work alongside the missionaries and nationals in the country where you go. You will be a support piece in that overall picture of missions.  You  Yourr project oject will suppor ortt the ove overall s sttrategy that has been prayerfully developed by the career missionaries with whom you will serve. Now that you understand how you fit into the “big picture,” let’s talk about your expectations. Ministry overseas does not work the same as ministry here in the U Uni nited ted Stat States. es. “Church” “Church” overseas overseas

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does not operate like your church. Even the wor ship experience is different. In fact, don’t expect anything to be like like the U nited nited State tates. s. Every Every cul culture ture is different, requiring different ways of going about ministry. As you adjust to differences overseas, remember not to be critical of others or the way they the y do things things.. A critical critical attitude ca can n interfere with wi th the work of the Holy Spirit. Keep an open mind— you just might pick up some great ministry ideas yourself. Flexibility and a cooperative attitude are your keys to a successful missions experience. As you prepare for your volunteer trip, whatever it may be, remember that you have an important role in the body of believers. God has uniquely gifted you to serve Him. “Each one should use whatever gift he has received to serve others, faithfully administering God’s grace in its various forms” (1 Peter 4:10, NIV). As you go forth in His power, sharing your faith and serving others, you will bring glory and honor to Him.

Southern Baptist Baptist Fayaz A Amm mmar hel helps ps an eye pati tient ent wi with th new glasses duri ring nghi his s volunteer tr triip to Punto Fij Fijo, Venezuela.

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The Indi g enous Pri n cici p l e i n MiM i ssioonsns he word indigenous means existing naturally in a country or simply “home grown.” So the

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Volunteers in Missions and the Indigenous Method

indigenous principle of missions simply means me ans the the gospel gospel should should be a natural eleelement in any cultural setting. The gospel challenges and tra transforms nsforms a cul culture, ture, but it it does not replace it with a foreign one. An indigenous church uses thoughts and

As a volunteer, you can be utilized effectively on the mission field. There are opportunities for Southern Baptists to be on mission with God throughout the world. Even strategies using volunteers, like yourself, should follow the indigenous principle so churches will will survive survive and and flouris flourish in their own way

actions which reflect the local environment.  Th  The gospel iis s practice iced and com communica icated in ways understood by that society because the language and structures structures are familiar. An An indi indige genous nous church is autonomous; it’s not dependent upon outside leadership and funds. Stated briefly, indigenous churches are reproducible by local believers, which is essential to a church planting movement. Here’s the explanation:  Believers, living under the Lordship of   Je  Jes sus Chr Christ ist and led led by the Ho Holy ly Spirit irit,, shape the discipleship and discipline.  Local congregations decide whether or

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within their own environment and on the basis of  their own financial resources. Many times local believers will request help from volunteers who then respond compassionately and emotionally. This response encourages local believers to depend on outside help and undermines the growth of strong indige indi genous work. Direct gifts and subsidy can create jealousy, erode local stewardship and undermine local priorities. When these believers look to the Lord’s provision through local resources they are more likely to develop strong churches that reproduce themselves. Let’s be partners in facilitating a church planting

not to have a paid leader or a building. Leaders emerge from the local local group and learn from doing.  Believers are more likely to focus on church planting/growth.  Natural witness by the whole membership is more likely.  Witness and growth follow natural networks of family, village and clan.  Church plants/growth follow a reproducible pattern. Great missions leaders say indigenous churches view themselves as church—self-functioning, self-

movement, a rapid multiplication of indigenous churches within a people group, by planting churches in a way that is reproducible by local believers.



determining, self-supporting, self-propagating and selfgiving. They are Christ s churches—free to follow what the Holy Hol y Spirit Spirit and the the Scriptures direct them to do. Planting indigenous churches requires great faith and trust in the power of God the Father, the sufficiency of the redeeming work of Jesus Christ and the powerful leadership of the indwelling Holy Spirit in the life of the new believers. The indigenous principle pl e also places places great demands upon missionaries; missionaries; they must be competent in their cross-cultural communication, and they must understand the worldview of the people to whom they minister. ‘

VOLUNTEERS IN MISSIONS INTERNATIONAL

The indigenous church on mission with God God in in the culture where it has been planted. planted.

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The Power of Prayer et’s take a few minutes to talk about the support you’ll need for your volunteer experience overseas. Your church, family and friends can all support you spiritually, finan-

2 snake. A vol snake. volunte unteer er nurs nurse e administere nistered d the anti-venom within 10 minutes while other  volunteers prayed.  Abo  Ab out two weeks lat later I receive ived a let letter 

cially and emotionally.  Th  They can support you spirit iritu uall lly y by prayin ing g. Prayer, by far, is the most impo important rtant support you will receive. It will become the foundation on which other support is built. Prayer will be your greatest need … and your greatest blessing. Paul and Peggy Grossman are retired Southern Baptist international missionaries to Burkina Faso, Senegal and Liberia. Here they share some personal examples of the power of prayer.

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On April 13, 1984, I was sleeping outside and was bitten by a deadly poisonous

from our son. Duri During ng prayer meeting on Apri Aprill 11, his pastor suddenly nly cl closed osed his Bible, Bible, turned to Paul Jr. and said, “W “We e must pray for your  father!” They prayed even before the accident  accident  because this pastor, who who II’d ’d never met, was led by the Holy Spirit to pray for me.—Paul I was going to Ghana from Senegal … when one of the two engines of the  pla  plan ne cau caught fire ire. It It loo look ked as thoug ough we were going to crash land. At the very last  minute, God straightened that plane out  and we landed without incident.

A group of faithful pray-ers — those who will will lliift up your entir ire e missions effort to the Lord — wil willl be your greatest asset.

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 Aboutt three wee  Abou weeks la latter, I receiv ceive ed a letterr from a WMU (Woman’s lette (Woman’s Missionary  Union) group in Michigan, none of whom I had ever met. They explained that at a meeting on September 3, someone had just 

We’d like to know if you had a specific need that day.” That was the day the plane was on fire!—Peggy   You  Yourr miss ission iona aries ies con constantly tell o off their expe-

read about the literacy work I was doing and brought my name up. The letter said, “We just couldn’t get away from the need to pray for you that day. Your name just 

riences with the power of prayer. Thank God for those “back home” who faithfully uplift the missions effort through prayer.  You  You will wa wan nt to enlist list a group oup of those faith ithful

kept ‘popping ‘poppi ng up’ up’ in discussi discussion and prayer prayer.

pray-ers who will bathe your entire missions experience in prayer. In fact, the preparation process needs prayer just as much as the trip itself!  You  You’r ’re e prob oba ably think inking ing, “Oka “Okay y, wh where do I start?” Well, when you think about the power of  prayer and the commitment to prayer, who in your church comes to mind? Who seems to know God intimately and walk with Him daily? Who are the most godly men and women in your church? Those people need to be part of your prayer support team. Before you go any further, stop what you’re doing and really think about these questions. Ask the Lord to bring to your mind those people who

Give your church, family and friend friends the privilege privilege of  supporti porting ng you by joini joining ng their hands in prayer — the foundation on which all all other support is is buil uilt. t. Choose faithful pray-ers to be part of your prayer support team team.

should make up your prayer team. Then contact them right away. Don’t delay the power of prayer! In addition to prayer, your church, family and friends also are sources of emotional support. They can encourage you every step of the way. Don’t hesitate to call on them as needs arise. Let your pastor, church family and friends know specific ways they can support you.

10 WAYS YOUR CHURCH, FAMI AMIL LY AND FRIENDS CAN SUPPORT YOU 1. Provide Provide for some of you yourr per persona sonall expen expenses ses 2. Provide Provide su supplies pplies for yo your ur trtripip

6. Go w ith you to the aairpor irportt to see you ooffff 7. Hold a short short pra prayer yer just befor beforee you boa board rd the plan planee

3. Form a ppraye rayerr su suppor pportt team

8. Give you a small packa package ge filled w ith items of enc encourag ouragement ement

4. Hold a ccommissionin ommissioningg service service** t o bless aand nd enc encoura ourage ge you

 — bookm book m arks, ark s, tatapes, pes, poe poems ms,, not notes, es, spec special ial Script Scri ptures ures,, etetc.c. 9. Welcome you home home w ith ban banners ners and ssigns igns w hen you arrive arrive

before the trip 5. W rite no notes tes of eencou ncourage ragement ment w hich you will open eeach ach day

at the airport 10. Allow you to sh share are yyour our eexpe xperie rienc ncee

of your trip

* A sample commissioning service is available from Customer Customer Ser Services vices at the Intern International ational Mi ssion BBoard. oard. Call (800 ) 866 - 362 1.

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Spirit ual Readiness ou must be spiritually prepared for the experience ahead of you. Do you talk with the Lord daily and spend time listening to Him? Have you thought about His desires for your trip … or are you focusing only on what you want? You cannot know what He wants unless you spend quality

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time with Him. Commit yourself to the spiritual disciplines of church attendance, Bible study and prayer. Spend time with the Lord daily if you are not already doing so. This process should begin at least one month before you go overseas and should include prayer, reading God’s Word and then listening to Him. You may want to purchase a daily devotional guide to help you with this discipline. Devotional guides usually deal with a particular Scripture each day. As you pray, remember to praise the Lord. Then confes conf ess your sins, sins, repent and and ask Hi His forgiveness.  Th  Thank Him for His ble les ssin ing gs and the way He is wo worrking in your life. Then express your needs to Him, ask-

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ing Him to prepare you for this missions experience. He will reveal to you His desires for your trip. He also will help you see through His eyes and understand through His heart. And finally, remember to listen to Him. Focus on that still, small voice inside you, realizing that your desires may not be His desires.  You  You als lso o may wa wan nt to k ke eep a jour journal to to re recor cord your thoughts thoughts and experiences experiences.. A journal can help you keep track of your spiritual growth. Spiritual preparation takes time. Don’t wait until the last minute. Once you arrive on the field, you will begin feeling the shock of strange food and smells, different customs and languages, limited

A devotional guide, such as Open Wi Window ndows, can help you develop the spir piriitual disci discipli plines nes of Bible Bible study and prayer.

TIPS FOR SPIRITUAL READINESS 1. M aintain a ggrowing, rowing, per persona sonall relation relationship ship wit h Jesu Jesuss Christ. Christ.

5. Keep a journ journalal of your thoughts and eexperiences xperiences to map your

2. Practice Practice the disciplin disciplines es of church attend attendance ance,, Bible stud studyy

spiritual journey journey..

and prayer.

6. Keep you yourr eyes eyes,, ears aand nd hear heartt open to w hat GGod od may be

3. Pray abou aboutt every aspect of your missions experience.

showing you.

4. Ask another person or group to pra prayy for you and your trip.

7. Remain Remain op open en to aany ny type ooff missio missions ns work — even her heree at ho home. me.

Charting Your Course  is an excellent spiritual preparation for your missions project.

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bathroom facilities, lack of privacy, varying worship styles and ways of ministry. In some countries you will have to deal with extreme heat, insects, unpredictable weather, lack of pure drinking water, poor roads and undesirable accommodations. If you are spiritually prepared, you will handle these situations with His joy and His peace.

“‘Not by might nor by power, but by my Spirit,’ says the Lord Almighty” (Zech 4:6, NIV). Depend on God and work in His Spirit as you go overseas. Don’t trust in your own strength and abilities. It is only through the Holy Spirit that anything of lasting value can be accomplished.

30-DAY SPIRITUAL PREPARATION

30 DAY SPIRITUAL PREPARATION 17 The True Me Meaasu surre ooff Gr Great atnnes esss 18 Differ ifferen ence cess Be Betwee tweenn Goo d M i ssi on ari e s

A ct s 1 5 :3 6 - 4 1

A ct s 1 : 1 - 1 2

19 When You Can anno nott Fin Finisishh th thee Tas askk

Lu Luke ke 10:25-35

5 Chri st i an Dep ress i o n

1 K i n gs 1 9 : 1 - 1 8

2 0 A ct i n g Li k e W ha h at You A re

6 Here I A m , Le Let M e Go!

Isa i a h 6 : 1 - 1 2

M aatt t h ew 2 11:: 1 8 - 19 19 Galatians 5:22-23

7 Fi t t o Serv e

Ephe si an s 5 : 1 - 1 7

2 1 Ov erc om iinng Pre j u di ce s

Jonah 1 :1 - 3;3; 3 :1 - 20 20 ; 4 : 1 - 3

8 A v a i l a bi l i t y P l us Ch ri st

J oh n 6 : 1 - 14 14

2 2 Serv e W i t h Gl ad ne ss

P sal m 1 0 0

9 Com m i ssi on ed t o Ser v e

M atat t hew 2288 : 1 9 - 20 20

2 3 Serv e W i t h Gra t i t u de

P sal m 1 0 3

1 0 Em p ow ere d t o Se rv e

M at t hew 2288 : 1 6 - 1 8

2 4 Serv e W itit h Co m pa ssi on

J o nah 4

1 1 Th e Un l i k e l y W i t n e s s 1 2 The Ex p ect e d Resu l t

J ohn 4 :1 - 4 2 J ohn 4 :1 - 4 2

2 5 Se r v e W i t h U r g e n cy 2 6 Serv e W iti t h Inn er St re ngt h

J o hn 9 : 1 - 7 J o hn 1 5 : 1 - 16 16

13 Mak Makin ingg th thee Ordinnary ary Ext xtrraor aordinar n ary Acts 4:1-19

2 7 Se r v e W i t h L o v e

J o hn 2 1 : 1 5 - 2 3

1 4 Rev i v e Us A ga i n

Psa l m 8 5

2 8 Serv e W itit h a Tea m Spi ri t

Ro m a n s 1 2

1 5 Ov erco m i n g Di f f i cu l t i e s

Nu m be rs 1 3 : 2 5 - 33 33

29 Serve fo forr Com Commo monn PPuurpo posses

1 Co Corin inth thiians 1: 1:23 23-31 -31;; 2:2:1

1 6 Rem ov i ng t he St o nes

J oh n 1 1 :3 9 - 4 0

30 Proc ocla laim imin ingg LLib ibeerty toto tthe he Poor

Isai aiah ah 61: 61:1-6 1-6

1 Sp i ri t ua ual RReenew aall ffoo r Se rv icice 2 Tak i ng Ti m e t o Pray

Psa l m 5511 M ark 1 : 3 5 - 4 5

3 The W oorrd an d t h e W ay ay

Psalm 1 1 9 :2 , 19 19 , 10 10 5 , 16 16 5

4 The Pow er t o Serv e

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Mat Matth theew 20: 20:20-28 20-28

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Prayerer Wal Pray W alking

n recent years God has been calling out prayer intercessors like yourself to walk the neighborhoods of your towns, as well as the sidewalks and paths of the world. This activity called prayer walking enables you to see, hear and touch the very objects of your intercession. As a prayer walker, you’re an on-site intercessor — someone who prays without ceasing as Paul tells us in 1 Thessalonians. Prayer just becomes a part of you. You will have an attitude

4 you’re a parent praying for your children’s schools or a factory worker interceding for your work place, you are joining with Christians all around the world who have heard God calling them to “pray on-site with with insight.” insight.” Hawthorne and Kendrick offer three suggestions as you prayer walk for the first time: 1. Pray with others. Te  Teaming ing up in two wos s or threes and praying opens an important

of prayer in everything you do. Prayer walking arose spontaneously in the mid1970s and has steadily expanded across the evangelical scene, according to Steve Hawthorne and Graham Kendrick, authors of Prayerwalking (Creation House, Lake Mary, Fla., 1993). Whether

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dimension of intercession. 2. Start near home. Agree on the general area to cover, but pick an unfamiliar neighborhood for starters. You may find stored-up memories get in the way of  intercession for near neighborhoods.

Use any opportunity avail available to pray for the country and the people where you are servi erving ng. Be aware of  prayer needs all around you as God call calls you to “pray on-site with with insight.”

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Praying with Praying with others can help prepare you for prayer wal walking king at home and overseas. The Lord wil willl hel help p you develop an attitude of prayer prayer as you notice notice specifi specific needs around you throughout the day. 3. Allow time. Try on one e hour for the firs irst prayer walk. Refresh your relationship with God and your prayer partners before starting. Discuss developments and concerns afterward.

your church and its leaders. Pray for employees wherever you go — the grocery store, doctor’s office, post office or local mall. Pray continually. After you have developed an attitude of prayer and have practiced prayer walking in your community, you will be better prepared for prayer walking

U se thes these e sugge suggestions stions to begin prayer prayer walking walki ng at home before your volunteer trip. Ask the Lord to help you develop an attitude of prayer. Be alert to your surroundings each day, using them as opportunities for prayer. Pray for your children as you’re packing their lunches for school. Pray for their teachers and friends. Pray for your community and government leaders while you’re running errands at the post office and grocery store. Pray for co-workers and your employers while at work. Pray for

overseas. You will see yourself as a pray-er, an intercessor, regardless of your volunteer assignment. Make it a priority to prayer walk in your specific country. You should already be familiar with some of  the historical, cultural and spiritual background of  the country which can help you pray specifically.  You  Yourr team should ould have a tim ime e of prayer toge ogether before beginning a prayer walk. Ask the Holy Spirit to guide your steps and your prayers as you prepare to walk. Then choose partners for the walk

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— groups of two or three are best. If your team is large, you will break into smaller groups which will each have an assigned area so no overlap occurs.  The  Th en agree on a tim ime e to return and share you ourr experience with the large group. During your prayer walk, be alert to your surroundings. God will bring you into contact with people, places and happenings for which you can pray.  You  You can wa walk lk and pray anywhe where — tou tourris istt areas, residential areas, campuses, around monuments and shrines, in market places, homes and offices.  Then be prepared for wh  The wha at prayer walk walkin ing g wi will ll do for you. You will begin to see through God’s eyes … and you will become burdened for the people

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and the country. Open O pen your eyes and your heart to His power. Remember, whether you’re at home or overseas, prayer produces eternal results. The church building you constructed will eventually deteriorate with age, but your intercession for people and cities around the world will have eternal results. Walking the streets of a city where  Jes  Jesus’na ’name isn isn’t even known own was was a real “eye-opener” for Joan Dick, a member of  First Baptist Church in Fairlea, W.Va. She was  p  pa art of a six-m ix-member prayer team that visit isite ed Bangkok, Thailand, and Thimphu, Bhutan. Seeing the Buddhist temples and smelling the incense moved her deeply. “We saw people bowing down before these idols and wondered how they can worship something that isn’t even real,”   Joa  Joan said id.. “ “We We saw lit litttle boy oys s going oing in intto monasteries to become monks and stay 

Prayer walker walker Kim Penrod prays for Buddhist monks in IIndia ndia as they medit ditate ate and chant mantras.

SUGGESTIONS FOR PRAYER 1. Pray Pray for the w itness of belie believers vers in the area — for bo boldnes ldnesss and encouragement.

5. Pra Prayy for the Lord to interve intervene ne w here eevil vil forces ar aree at w ork. 6. Pra Prayy f or families to be united throug throughh the Holy Spirit.

2. Pray for churc churches hes in the area to re reach ach out to people and their needs.

7. Prais Praisee the Lo Lord rd an andd w orship orship Him as yo youu w alk.

3. Pray Pray that lost peopl peoplee w ill become open to hear hearing ing abou aboutt Jesus

8. Give hono honorr and glor gloryy to the Lord for your participation in this pra prayer yer w alk.

and then accepting Him as their Lord and Savior. 4. Pray Pray for t hose in pos positions itions of leader leadership ship w ithin the countr countryy  — foforr ththeieirr sal va vatiti on and w ititnes ness.s.

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PREPARATION GUIDE 4- 3

 

there for life. There was such sadness in the children’s eyes. They seemed to be in such bondage.”   Joan’s group oup wa walk lke ed the streets of the cities and visited government buildings and holy sites. Everywhere they went they   pr  prayed for the salva lvation of the people ople they  saw. When providence let them enter a temple usually closed to outsiders, they  walked around the Buddha statue and  pr  prayed that the ligh light of the gosp ospel w wou ould ld break through that country’s darkness.

In Morocco, Morocco, prayer walkers pause to pray for their host country country near the H Has assan IIII Mosque, the secondlargest Islamic mosque in the worl world. d.

PRAYER WALKING RESOURCES 

Prayerwalking , by Steve Haw thorne and Graham Kendrick (Cr (Creation eation House, LLake ake M ary, ary, Fla., Fla., 199 3).



Prayer Journeys: A Leader s How- To M anua anual l  is available from f rom the Caleb Project, 10 W est Dry Cree Creekk Circle, Littleton, CCOO 801 20.



Contact Customer Services at the International Mission Board, (800) 866-3621.



Contact the International Mission Board electronically at www.imb.org

’ ’       

4- 4 PREPARATION GUIDE

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5

Sharing Youourr TTesestt im ony on y

our spiritual preparation would be incomplete without a personal testimony — the simple story of how you became a Christ Christian and the difference it is making in your life. We’ll take the next few minutes to give you some suggestions on preparing your testimony. Remember to keep it it short and simple simple so it it can be translated and shared with wi th the nationals in your country. Don’t use long words, jokes jokes and idi idioms oms. They They don’t tra translate nslate easily. Stay away from such topi topics cs as divorce, divorce, smoki smoking ng and drinking drinking which many nationals tionals v viiew as inappropriate priate and offensi offensive ve behavior. vior. Also Also stay away from the topic of money. IIt’s t’s okay to say that God provided provided all the money for your trip. Just don’t refer to specific dol-

lar amounts. The The cost of your tri trip p may be much more than the annual iinco ncome me of many people people overseas. Keep your testimony short — no more than one typed page. Begin by telling about yourself: your name, where you live, your job and why you’re in that country. Next tell a little about your life before becoming a Christian. Then share how you became a Christian — what your life was like after accepting H im a as s your pe persona rsonall Savio Saviorr. Use U se Scriptures whi which ch are meaningful to you here.  The  Th en explain lain wh wha at being ing a Ch Chrrist istian ian means to you today. How does it make your life different? How do you live each day? What does it mean to you personally?

Y Sharing aring your personal testi timony mony — how you became a Christian Christian and the difference iit’s t’s making in your lliife — can help lead others to Jes Jesus Chris Christ.

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PREPARATION GUIDE 5- 1

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SHARING YOUR   TESTIMONY DO’S

DON’TS

1. Sha hare re yo your ur::

1. Do Don’ n’tt talk talk ab abou out:t:



Name



Divorce



Where you live



Smoking



Your profession



Drinking



Why you came

2. Sha Share re what being a CChristia hristiann means to you: 

Your life before Christ



Your life after Christ

3. Sha Share re how how you bbecame ecame a CChristia hristian: n: 

Why you did

4. Sha Share re ho howw someon someonee else ccan an bec become ome a CChris hristian: tian: 

Allow them to resp respond ond

2. Do Don’t n’t talk abo about ut mone money:y: 

How much the trip cost



How God provided

3. Do Don’ n’tt be lo long ng wind winded ed.. 4. Don Don’t’t use religio religious us jarg jargon. on. 5. Do Don’ n’tt tell tell jok jokes es..

5. Expre xpress ss your than thanks ks for being able to sha share re your testimon testimony.y.

Finally, explain how others can have a similar experience. You You need to cl clea early rly and simply present the steps to salvation and a personal relationship with

you to share your testimony with them. Your testimony is uniquely your own. No one can share it but you. You can help others see that Christ can

 Je  Jes sus Chr Christ. Those wh who o are listenin ing g to or readin ing g your testimony shoul should d have opportunity to respond. Then remember to thank them for all allowi owing you to share. Remember, you are going overseas to build relationships with new friends which will enable

make a difference in their lives, too. Why don’t you stop what you’re doing now and take time to work through your testimony. If  you’ve never shared your testimony before, ask your pastor to go over what you have written.

HELPFUL RESOURCES  Continuing W itness Training , published  People

by the North American Mission Board.

Sharing Jesus , published by the North American Mission Board.

5- 2 PREPARATION GUIDE

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M y Tes Testt i mony o ny I

ntroduce yourself:

Y

our life before becoming a Christian:

6

H

ow I became a Christian:

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W

H

hat it means to be a CChris hristian tian — impact on my life:

ow other otherss can hhave ave a similar eexper xperience ience — plan of sa salvation: lvation:

PREPARATIO N   GUIDE

6- 1

G

ive the opportunity for others to make a decision for Christ:

6- 2

PREPARATIO N  G UIDE

 

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M oney: oney: Wh Whereree Will It CComomee FFrom? rom?

7

God used a North Carolina woman to help when the Southern Baptist  missionaries in Chile had an urgent  need for someone to teach their children. They had asked for 10 to 12 volunteers to work with the MKs (missionary  kids) during their annual mission meeting, and only three people had responded.

sion meeting. She was willing to go but  needed funds to finance her trip. The members of Matthews church began beg an tto o pray. A third of the $1,600 cost of  the trip was raised in three days. Help from another friend, along with a bonus Nanci received at work, finished out the amount. Still another friend donated all the craft  supplies she needed for the children. Nanci didn’t didn’t worry about how funds woul would d be provided or how her family ily woul would d get along long without without her. “Yo “You u ju just st have to be avail vailable, able, and God wil will take care of you,” she said.

Nanci Singer, a member of Matthews (N.C.) Baptist Church, found out about the opportunity only two weeks before the mis-

 Yo  You made your ourself available, le, like like Na Nan nci, ci, and now God will take care of the rest. That doesn’t mean He

N

ow let’s talk about another importa important nt need for your volunteer missions experience — money. How will you cover the expense of  your trip? Where will the money come from?

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