of 120

The Farnsworth Invention

Published on July 2016 | Categories: Topics, Books - Fiction | Downloads: 3 | Comments: 0
85 views

The Farnsworth Invention is a stage play by Aaron Sorkin adapted from an unproduced screenplay about Philo Farnsworth's invention of the television[clarify] and David Sarnoff, the RCA president who stole the design.

Comments

Content


 

1
 

THE FARNSWORTH INVENTION
by Aaron Sorkin


 


 

2
 


 

3
 


 


 

4
 


 


 

5
 

ACT
 ONE.
 
 
 


  Visual
 elements
 of
 Philo
 T.
 Farnsworth’s
 television
 operating
 system
 with
 equations
  incorporated
 scenically?
 
 
  The
 action
 should
 flow
 from
 scene
 to
 scene
 as
 seamlessly
 as
 possible.
 
  Prologue
 
  A
 light
 comes
 up
 on
 DAVID
 SARNOFF,
 who
 addresses
 the
 audience
 directly
 and
 informally.
 
  SARNOFF.
 
  Good
 evening.
 I’m
 David
 Sarnoff.
 There’s
 a
 rule
 in
 storytelling
 that
 says
 you
 never
 tell
 your
  audience
 something
 they
 already
 know
 but
 I’m
 gonna
 chance
 it
 anyway
 by
 starting
 like
  this:
 the
 only
 reason
 you
 can
 see
 me
 right
 now
 is
 because
 light
 is
 reflecting
 off
 of
 me.
 Light
  bounces
 and
 I
 want
 to
 make
 sure
 everyone
 knows
 that
 or
 20
 minutes
 into
 the
 show
 you’re
  gonna
 be
 thinking
 what
 in
 the
 hell
 is
 happening?
 Can
 we
 show
 everyone
 else?
 
  Lights
 up
 on
 the
 ACTORS
 in
 the
 cast
 placed
 variously
 around
 the
 playing
 space.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Thank
 you.
 
  The
 ACTORS
 exit.
 
  SARNOFF.
  You
 also
 need
 to
 know
 that
 17
 is
 a
 very
 important
 number
 but
 I’m
 gonna
 remind
 you
 of
  that
 later.
 And
 by
 the
 way
 the
 ends
 do
 justify
 the
 means,
 that’s
 what
 means
 are
 for.
 Now
 it’s
  1921
 and
 not
 a
 lot
 of
 people
 were
 thinking
 about
 electrons
 except
 the
 writers
 of
 comic
  books
 and
 the
 readers
 of
 comic
 books,
 one
 of
 whom
 was
 a
 kid
 from
 Indian
 Creek,
 Utah
  whose
 family
 had
 just
 moved
 to
 Rigby,
 Idaho
 to
 live
 on
 his
 uncle’s
 potato
 farm.
 If
 there
 are
  any
 Brits
 in
 the
 theatre
 they’re
 gonna
 start
 shouting
 John
 Logie
 Baird
 at
 me
 but
 they’re
  wrong.
 Baird
 didn’t
 have
 it.
 Neither
 did
 Nipkow
 or
 Ernst
 Alexanderson
 and
 neither
 did
  Vladimir
 Zworykin.
 I
 know
 they
 didn’t
 have
 it
 ‘cause
 I
 knew
 these
 men
 and
 Zworykin
  worked
 for
 me.
 Nobody
 had
 it,
 nobody
 was
 close
 and
 lemme
 tell
 you
 nobody
 cared
 that
  much
 ‘cause
 at
 best
 it
 was
 gonna
 be
 considered
 a
 nifty
 parlor
 trick.
 Nobody
 had
 it
 except
 a
  14-­‐year-­‐old
 kid
 in
 Rigby,
 Idaho
 standing
 in
 a
 field
 of
 potatoes.
 He
 rode
 a
 three-­‐disc
 plow,
  drawn
 by
 a
 mule,
 making
 three
 parallel
 lines
 in
 the
 earth
 at
 once.
 Then
 three
 more.
 Then
 
  three
 more
 and
 three
 more
 until
 he
 was
 done
 with
 his
 work.
 He
 stepped
 off
 the
 plow,
  looked
 back
 at
 the
 rows
 and
 rows
 of
 parallel
 lines,
 and
 that’s
 when
 he
 realized
 the
 key
 to
  the
 most
 influential
 invention
 in
 history.
 So
 he
 did
 what
 any
 world-­‐class
 electrical
 engineer
  would
 do
 in
 that
 situation:
 He
 went
 to
 see
 his
 9th
 grade
 science
 teacher.
 
  I.
 1
 Classroom
 
  TOLMAN
 is
 working
 at
 his
 desk.
 Young
 PHILO
 taps
 on
 the
 open
 door.
 
  PHILO.
 
  Excuse
 me.
 


  6
 
  TOLMAN.
  Yeah.
 
  PHILO.
  Mr.
 Tolman?
 
  TOLMAN.
  What
 can
 I
 do
 for
 you?
 
  PHILO.
  My
 name’s
 Philo
 Farnsworth.
 My
 family
 just
 moved
 here.
 I’m
 starting
 school
 on
 Monday.
 
  TOLMAN.
  Well
 you’re
 gonna
 have
 me
 for
 Basic
 Science.
 
  PHILO.
  I
 wanted
 to
 ask
 you
 about
 that.
 I
 was
 wondering
 if
 I
 could
 skip
 Basic
 Science
 and
 take
 your
  chemistry
 class
 instead.
 
  TOLMAN.
  You
 gotta
 have
 Basic
 Science
 before
 you
 can
 take
 Chemistry.
 
  PHILO.
  I
 understand.
 
  TOLMAN.
  Good.
 
  PHILO.
  I
 think
 that’s
 perfectly
 reasonable.
 
  TOLMAN.
  Thanks.
 (pause)
 Anything
 else?
 
  PHILO.
  Could
 I
 ask
 you
 a
 quick
 question?
 
  SARNOFF
 (to
 audience).
  Remember,
 it’s
 1921,
 the
 guy
 hasn’t
 started
 ninth
 grade
 and
 we’re
 in
 Huckleberry,
 Idaho.
  Listen
 to
 what
 comes
 out
 of
 his
 mouth.
 
  PHILO.
  When
 light
 hits
 photoelectric
 material
 it
 releases
 a
 spray
 of
 electrons,
 right?
 
  TOLMAN.
  Hm?
 
 
 


  7
  SARNOFF.
  “Hm?”
 This
 is
 Justin
 Tolman,
 by
 the
 way.
 He’s
 a
 decent
 enough
 guy
 but
 he’ll
 be
 easy
 to
  destroy
 during
 court
 depositions.
 Right
 now
 he
 has
 no
 idea
 what’s
 just
 walked
 into
 the
  classroom.
 Go
 ahead,
 ask
 the
 question
 again.
 
  PHILO.
  Photoelectric
 material,
 like,
 say,
 selenium,
 it
 releases
 a
 spray
 of
 electrons
 when
 light
 hits
 it?
 
  TOLMAN.
  Yeah.
 
  PHILO.
  And
 a
 cathode
 ray
 does
 essentially
 the
 opposite,
 right?
 It
 takes
 invisible
 electrons
 and
  makes
 them
 glow?
 
  TOLMAN.
  (beat)
 I
 think
 so.
 
  PHILO.
  Okay.
 Thank
 you.
 
  PHILO
 exits.
 
  TOLMAN.
  What
 the
 hell?
 
  SARNOFF.
 
  Yeah,
 get
 used
 to
 it,
 my
 friend.
 (to
 audience)
 He’d
 already
 told
 his
 father
 about
 the
 idea.
  He’d
 explained
 that
 “tele”
 was
 Greek.
 It
 meant
 “distant.”
 Vision
 from
 a
 distance.
 Television.
  The
 father
 said
 he
 shouldn’t
 repeat
 this
 stuff
 to
 anyone
 else
 ‘cause
 no
 one
 would
 take
 him
  seriously
 again.
 This
 is
 like
 Toscanini’s
 dad
 telling
 him
 no
 one’s
 taking
 you
 seriously
 with
  that
 stick
 in
 your
 hand.
 (beat)
 It’s
 Tuesday,
 second
 day
 of
 school.
 
  TOLMAN
 (to
 class).
  All
 right,
 that’s
 it.
 Everyone
 put
 the
 homework
 assignments
 on
 my
 desk
 as
 you
 leave
 this
  room
 as
 quickly
 and
 quietly
 as
 possible.
 
  The
 students
 file
 out,
 dropping
 off
 the
 homework
 as
 they
 go.
 
  SARNOFF.
  It
 was
 a
 one-­‐page
 assignment
 from
 the
 front
 of
 the
 textbook.
 
  TOLMAN
 (to
 PHILO).
  Whoa,
 whoa,
 what’s
 this?
 
  PHILO.
  Homework.
 
 
 


  TOLMAN.
  This
 is
 last
 night’s
 homework?
 
  PHILO.
  No,
 I
 just
 went
 ahead
 and
 did
 it
 for
 the
 whole
 year,
 is
 that
 okay?
 
  TOLMAN
 leafs
 through
 PHILO’s
 pages.
 
  TOLMAN.
  All
 right,
 you
 know
 what,
 you
 stay
 for
 a
 second.
 The
 rest
 of
 you,
 let’s
 go.
 C’mon,
 let’s
 go.
 
  The
 rest
 of
 the
 students
 exit
 
  TOLMAN.
  Kid.
 Your
 father,
 he
 works
 for
 the
 government?
 He’s
 a
 scientist?
 
  PHILO.
  He’s
 a
 potato
 farmer.
 
  TOLMAN.
  You
 read
 at
 home?
 
 
  PHILO.
  Yes,
 sir.
 
  TOLMAN.
  Tesla?
 
  PHILO.
  Yes.
 
  TOLMAN.
  Edison?
 
  PHILO.
  Yes.
 
  TOLMAN.
  Marconi?
 
  PHILO.
  Yes.
 
  TOLMAN.
  What
 else?
 
  PHILO.
  I
 like
 the
 Sears
 Roebuck
 catalog.
 
 

8
 


  TOLMAN.
  Okay,
 well,
 you’ve
 passed
 Basic
 Science.
 
  PHILO.
  Hey
 thanks,
 that’s
 great
 news.
 
  PHILO
 just
 stands
 there.
 
  TOLMAN.
  (pause)
 That’s
 it.
 
  PHILO.
  Can
 I
 draw
 something
 for
 you?
 
  TOLMAN.
  Excuse
 me?
 
  PHILO.
  Can
 I
 draw
 something
 for
 you?
 
  TOLMAN.
  Yeah.
 
  TOLMAN
 hands
 him
 a
 piece
 of
 paper
 and
 PHILO
 starts
 drawing.
 
 

9
 


 
  PHILO
 (while
 he’s
 drawing).
  You
 trap
 light
 in
 an
 empty
 jar,
 roughly
 the
 size
 of
 what
 your
 mother
 would
 use
 to
 keep
 fruit
  fresh
 only
 it
 would
 have
 to
 be
 a
 vacuum
 jar.
 A
 vacuum
 jar,
 and
 the
 inside
 of
 the
 jar
 is
  treated
 with
 a
 special
 surface
 that
 reacts
 to
 light
 and
 converts
 it
 into
 electrical
 impulses.
  And
 we
 scan
 the
 impulses.
 Line
 by
 line.
 50,
 60
 lines,
 I
 don’t
 know,
 500
 lines.
 The
 effect
  would
 be
 instantaneous
 but
 in
 actuality
 we’d
 be
 reading
 it
 line
 by
 line.
 The
 way
 we
 plow
 a
  field.
 
 


  10
  TOLMAN.
  Son,
 the
 cathode,
 the
 selenium,
 the
 vacuum
 jar,
 what’s
 all
 this
 about?
 
  PHILO.
  I
 think
 there’s
 a
 way
 to
 transmit
 pictures
 electronically
 through
 the
 air
 the
 way
 we’re
 doing
  with
 sound
 and
 radio.
 
 
  I.
 2
 Uzlian
 Shtetl
 
  A
 RUSSIAN
 POLICE
 OFFICER
 enters.
 
  RUSSIAN
 OFFICER.
  Komendah!
 Zazhgite
 fakuly!
 
  PHILO
 (to
 the
 audience,
 assuming
 the
 role
 of
 narrator).
  Shtetl
 is
 a
 Yiddish
 word
 that
 means
 ghetto
 and
 this
 shtetl
 was
 in
 the
 Uzlian
 Province
 of,
 I
  think,
 Minsk,
 but
 I’m
 not
 sure.
 There’s
 a
 lot
 about
 his
 history
 that’s
 a
 little
 cloudy
 to
 me.
 
  RUSSIAN
 OFFICER.
  Komendah!
 
  A
 BOY
 (SARNOFF)
 and
 his
 PARENTS
 are
 packing
 their
 stuff
 into
 a
 wagon.
 
  PHILO.
  Sarnhoff
 is
 10
 years
 old
 when
 the
 Czar
 sends
 the
 cops
 to
 empty
 out
 the
 village.
 
  RUSSIAN
 OFFICER.
  Zazhgite
 fakuly!
 
  PHILO
 (to
 SARNOFF).
  Translate
 the
 Russian
 please.
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 don’t
 remember
 a
 lot
 of
 Russian.
 
  PHILO.
  You
 remember
 this.
 
 
  SARNOFF.
  It
 had
 something
 to
 do
 with
 lighting
 the—
 
  PHILO.
  Translate
 the
 damn
 Russian.
 
  SARNOFF.
  (beat)
 Komendah
 means—it’s
 “company,”
 “battalion,”
 he’s
 calling
 to
 the
 other
 officers.
 
 


  11
  PHILO.
  Zazhgite
 fakuly?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Light
 the
 torches.
 
  PHILO.
  An
 officer
 comes
 up
 to
 the
 boy.
 
  OFFICER.
  Ne
 nada
 bayat’sia.
 My
 me
 zveri.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Don’t
 be
 scared,
 we’re
 not
 monsters.
 
  OFFICER.
  U
 tvaego
 alsa
 mnoga
 knig.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Your
 father
 has
 a
 lot
 of
 books.
 
  OFFICER.
  Ty
 lyubish
 knigi?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Do
 you
 like
 books?
 
  PHILO.
  And
 10-­‐year-­‐old
 Sarnoff
 says
 to
 the
 armed
 Russian
 officer?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Pashol
 k
 chortu.
 
  PHILO.
  Which
 means?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Go
 fuck
 yourself.
 
  PHILO.
  And
 then
 they
 burned
 his
 house
 down
 while
 he
 watched.
 The
 family
 moved
 to
 the
 lower
  east
 side
 of
 Manhattan
 where
 Sarnoff
 sold
 Yiddish
 newspapers
 on
 a
 street
 corner.
 His
  father
 died
 when
 he
 was
 13
 and
 by
 14
 he
 had
 absolutely
 no
 trace
 of
 a
 Russian
 accent.
 The
  New
 York
 Herald
 was
 hiring
 messenger
 boys
 and
 he
 went
 in
 for
 the
 job
 but
 when
 he
 got
 to
  the
 Herald
 building
 he
 went
 into
 the
 wrong
 office.
 
 
 
 
 


  12
  I.
 3
 Office
 
  A
 WOMAN
 and
 a
 MAN
 are
 working
 at
 a
 desk
 and
 a
 THIRD
 MAN
 is
 sitting
 at
 a
 table.
 The
  THIRD
 MAN
 has
 headphones
 on
 and
 is
 transcribing
 a
 message
 at
 a
 wireless
 set.
 
  Young
 SARNOFF
 walks
 in.
 
  WOMAN.
  Can
 I
 help
 you?
 
  SARNOFF.
  The
 paper
 said
 you
 need
 messenger
 boys
 and
 I’d
 like
 the
 job.
 
  WOMAN.
  This
 isn’t
 the
 Herald,
 you’re
 in
 the
 wrong
 office.
 You
 want
 to
 go
 down
 the
 hall.
 
  SARNOFF.
  I’m
 sorry?
 
  WOMAN.
  This
 isn’t
 the
 newspaper,
 we
 just
 lease
 office
 space
 here.
 This
 is
 the
 Commercial
 Cable
  Company.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Sorry.
 
  WOMAN.
  Not
 a
 problem,
 you
 want
 to
 be
 down
 the
 hall.
 
  SARNOFF
 begins
 to
 leave,
 but
 then
 stops.
 
  SARNOFF.
  What
 do
 you
 do?
 
  WOMAN.
  We
 send
 and
 receive
 messages.
 (beat)
 Radio,
 you
 heard
 of
 it?
 
  PHILO.
  He
 was
 in
 love.
 I
 know
 how
 he
 felt.
 It
 took
 him
 a
 week
 and
 a
 half
 to
 become
 the
 company’s
  best
 wireless
 operator
 but
 they
 fired
 him
 anyway
 ‘cause
 he
 wouldn’t
 work
 on
 the
 Jewish
  holidays.
 That
 was
 fine,
 though,
 ‘cause
 it
 set
 the
 stage
 for
 his
 first
 triumph
 and
 it
 was
 on
 a
  massive
 scale.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


  13
  I.
 4
 American
 Marconi
 
  Something’s
 going
 on.
 There’s
 a
 large
 crowd
 and
 people
 are
 being
 held
 back
 by
 a
 few
 police
  officers.
 
  SARNOFF
 is
 manning
 a
 wireless
 machine.
 Every
 once
 in
 a
 while
 he’ll
 shout
 out
 a
 name
 to
 the
  crowd
 as
 he
 writes
 it
 down.
 
  SARNOFF.
  James
 Cooley!
 James
 W.
 Cooley!
 
  PHILO.
  He’s
 been
 hired
 by
 American
 Marconi,
 the
 American
 arm
 of
 the
 British-­‐owned
 Marconi
  Wireless
 Telegraph
 and
 Signal
 Company.
 American
 Marconi
 rented
 a
 tiny
 room
 on
 the
  second
 floor
 of
 Wanamaker’s
 Department
 Store.
 On
 this
 night,
 the
 police
 were
 handling
 the
  crowd
 that
 was
 growing
 down
 on
 the
 street
 and
 there
 were
 even
 a
 few
 officers
 upstairs
  with
 some
 V.I.P.’s
 that
 had
 been
 let
 in.
 It
 was
 Sunday
 night
 and
 30
 hours
 earlier,
 the
  Parisian,
 a
 passenger
 ship
 about
 300
 nautical
 miles
 off
 the
 coast
 of
 Nova
 Scotia,
 had
 gotten
  a
 message.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Mrs.
 William
 Christiansen!
 
  WACHTEL
 makes
 his
 way
 through
 the
 crowd
 at
 the
 door
 over
 to
 SIMMS.
 
  WACHTEL.
  What
 the
 hell
 is
 going
 on?
 I’ve
 been
 on
 a
 train
 from
 Chicago
 for
 sixteen
 hours.
 
  SIMMS.
  The
 Carpathia’s
 got
 712
 survivors
 on
 board.
 
  WACHTEL.
  Confirmed?
 
  SIMMS.
  Yes.
 
  WACHTEL.
  How
 do
 we
 know?
 
  SIMMS.
  They
 radioed
 another
 ship,
 the
 Parisian
 and
 we’re
 on
 with
 them
 right
 now.
 
  WACHTEL.
  They’ve
 got
 the
 names?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Douglas
 W.
 Winston.
 
 


  14
  SIMMS.
  We’ve
 got
 the
 names.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Winslow.
 I’m
 sorry.
 Douglas
 W.
 Winslow.
 
  WACHTEL.
  Are
 you
 telling
 me
 we’re
 the
 only
 one
 with
 the
 names
 of
 the
 survivors?
 
  SIMMS.
  Yeah.
 
  WACHTEL.
  How
 the
 hell
 did-­‐-­‐?
 
  SIMMS.
  We
 got
 all
 the
 other
 wireless
 stations
 on
 the
 Atlantic
 coast
 to
 shut
 down
 to
 avoid
  interference.
 
  WACHTEL.
  Would
 there
 have
 been
 interference?
 
  SIMMS.
  No!
 
  WACHTEL.
  Who
 got
 them
 to
 do
 that?
 
  SIMMS
 (indicating
 SARNOFF).
  He
 did.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Mr.
 and
 Mrs.
 Theodore
 Meriweather.
 
  WOMAN
 FROM
 CROWD.
  And
 Julianne?
 Julianne
 Meriweather?
 
  SARNOFF
 holds
 up
 his
 hand
 to
 indicate
 “just
 a
 moment”—
 
  WACHTEL.
  Who
 is
 that
 guy?
 
  SIMMS.
  He
 just
 got
 fired
 from
 the
 Commercial
 Cable
 Company
 ‘cause
 he
 wouldn’t
 work
 on
  Hannukah
 or
 something.
 He’s
 been
 sitting
 there
 for
 30
 hours
 straight,
 he
 won’t
 give
 up
 the
  chair.
 
  WACHTEL.
  What’s
 his
 name?
 


  15
 
  SIMMS.
  David
 Sarnoff.
 
  PHILO.
  And
 American
 Marconi
 was
 on
 the
 map.
 Or
 at
 least
 on
 the
 map
 enough
 to
 catch
 the
  attention
 of
 the
 War
 Department,
 which
 decided
 that
 it
 probably
 wasn’t
 a
 good
 idea
 to
 have
  a
 foreign
 company
 installing
 electronic
 communications
 systems
 in
 U.S.
 ships.
 By
  Congressional
 mandate,
 American
 Marconi
 had
 to
 be
 sold
 and
 they
 asked
 the
 General
  Electric
 Corporation
 to
 pick
 it
 up
 for
 some
 lunch
 money.
 GE
 did
 their
 duty
 and
 at
 a
 press
  conference
 held
 on
 Sarnoff’s
 22nd
 birthday,
 with
 Sarnoff
 and
 his
 wife
 Lizette,
 Jim
 Harbord
  announced
 that
 GE
 had
 acquired
 American
 Marconi
 and
 was
 converting
 its
 assets
 into
 a
  new
 company.
 
  TWO
 SEXY
 WOMEN
 (holding
 the
 RCA
 logo).
  The
 Radio
 Corporation
 of
 America!
 
  PHILO.
  Sarnoff
 was
 appointed
 Commercial
 Manager
 at
 45
 dollars-­‐a-­‐week.
 It
 was
 an
 executive
 job
  but
 the
 one
 no
 one
 else
 wanted.
 The
 job
 meant
 coming
 up
 with
 new
 uses
 for
 radio,
 and
  other
 than
 “Please
 help
 me,
 my
 boat
 is
 sinking,”
 there
 were
 no
 other
 uses
 for
 radio
 and
 the
  other
 guys
 who’d
 founded
 the
 company
 with
 him
 gave
 him
 a
 hard
 time
 about
 it.
 In
 fact,
 at
  the
 press
 conference,
 one
 colleague
 asked
 him:
 
  SIMMS.
 
 Exactly
 what
 do
 you
 have
 in
 mind
 for
 future
 uses
 of
 radio?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Farm
 reports.
 
  SIMMS.
  What?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Weather
 reports
 for
 farmers.
 
  PHILO.
  His
 colleagues
 kind
 of
 walked
 away
 to
 listen
 to
 the
 rest
 of
 the
 press
 conference,
 so
 they
  never
 heard
 him
 add—
 
  SARNOFF.
  And
 music.
 
  PHILO.
  And
 music
 is
 right.
 Information
 and
 entertainment.
 Why?
 Because
 Sarnoff’s
 vision
 wasn’t
  one
 person
 talking
 to
 another
 person,
 it
 was
 one
 person
 talking
 to
 a
 million
 people.
 A
  network
 of
 radio
 stations,
 all
 under
 the
 RCA
 banner,
 broadcasting
 a
 signal
 to
 millions
 of
  living
 rooms
 with
 RCA
 radio
 receivers.
 
 


  16
 
  I.
 5
 Community
 Chest
 
  SARNOFF
 (to
 audience,
 assuming
 role
 of
 narrator).
  Philo
 Farnsworth
 was
 out
 of
 high
 school,
 out
 of
 the
 Navy
 and
 after
 a
 year
 at
 Brigham
 Young,
  he
 ran
 out
 of
 money
 for
 tuition.
 
 It
 was
 time
 to
 build
 a
 television
 set.
 Through
 a
 series
 of
  letters,
 Farnsworth
 made
 an
 appointment
 to
 see
 George
 Everson
 and
 Leslie
 Gorrell
 at
 the
  local
 Community
 Chest
 in
 Provo,
 Utah.
 
 
  EVERSON
 and
 GORRELL
 enter,
 sit,
 and
 begin
 working.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Professionally,
 Everson
 and
 Gorrell
 were
 fundraisers
 for
 charitable
 organizations,
 but
  privately
 they’d
 been
 considering
 investing
 some
 of
 their
 own
 money
 in
 technology,
 though
  what
 they
 probably
 had
 in
 mind
 was
 farm
 technology.
 
  PHILO
 enters.
 
  EVERSON.
  I’m
 George
 Everson.
 
  PHILO.
  Philo
 Farnsworth.
 
  EVERSON.
  This
 is
 my
 partner,
 Leslie
 Gorrell.
 
  GORRELL.
  Philo.
 That’s
 an
 unusual
 name.
 
  PHILO.
  My
 grandfather
 was
 an
 officer
 in
 the
 Civil
 War
 and
 he
 got
 the
 name
 from—
 
  GORRELL.
  Which
 side?
 
  PHILO.
  I’m
 sorry?
 
  GORRELL.
  Which
 side
 was
 he
 on
 in
 the
 war?
 
 
  EVERSON.
  Leslie.
 
  GORRELL.
  I’m
 not
 allowed
 to
 ask
 which
 side?
 
 


  17
  EVERSON.
  It’s
 not
 polite.
 
  GORRELL.
  It
 was
 a
 war,
 George!
 
  EVERSON.
  Leslie’s
 upset
 today
 because
 our
 car
 won’t
 run.
 
  GORRELL.
  And
 you
 gotta
 tell
 people?
 
  EVERSON.
  We
 went
 in
 on
 a
 car
 together.
 
  PHILO.
  That
 roadster
 outside?
 
  EVERSON.
  Leslie
 hates
 the
 car.
 75
 dollars
 a
 piece.
 Mint
 condition,
 reliable.
 Comfortable,
 speeds
 up
 to
  50
 miles—
 
  GORRELL.
  Reliable?
 
  EVERSON.
  Excuse
 me,
 but
 that
 car
 has
 been—
 
  GORRELL.
  That
 car
 is
 sitting
 in
 front
 of
 the—it’s
 inert!
 What
 should
 we
 rely
 upon
 it
 for
 exactly?
 
  EVERSON.
  Maybe
 if
 we
 exhibited
 a
 more
 business-­‐like
 demeanor
 and
 stuck
 to
 the
 matter
 at
 hand—
 
  GORRELL.
  Sure.
 
  EVERSON.
  Thank
 you.
 
  GORRELL.
  What
 the
 hell
 was
 your
 name
 again?
 
  PHILO.
  Philo
 Farnsworth.
 
  GORRELL.
  And
 what
 do
 you
 want?
 
 


  18
  PHILO.
  I
 need
 $20,000
 to
 set
 up
 a
 lab
 and
 create
 a
 device
 that’ll
 transmit
 pictures,
 moving
 pictures,
  electronically
 through
 the
 air,
 and
 then
 reassemble
 them
 at
 great
 distances,
 all
 in
 a
 fraction
  of
 a
 second.
 
  GORRELL.
  (pause)
 Hm?
 
  PHILO.
  You
 see,
 if
 you
 can
 convert
 a
 light
 image
 into
 many
 horizontal
 lines—
 
  GORRELL.
  No.
 You
 want
 how
 much?
 
  PHILO.
  $20,
 000.
 (beat)
 It’s
 a
 lot,
 but
 it’s
 what
 I
 believe
 it’ll
 take
 to
 create
 a
 working
 prototype.
 Bare
  bones.
 You
 have
 to
 understand
 we’d
 be
 starting
 with
 nothing
 but
 a
 work-­‐table
 and
 a
  generator
 so
 I’d
 have
 to—
 
  GORRELL.
  This
 is
 the
 Community
 Chest.
 
  PHILO.
  Yes.
 
  GORRELL.
  We’re
 fundraisers.
 
  PHILO.
  Yeah.
 
  GORRELL.
  We
 raise
 money
 for
 charities.
 There’s
 a
 flood,
 a
 town
 needs
 a
 new
 school,
 that’s
 what
 we
  like.
 
  PHILO.
  But
 your
 letter
 said
 you
 might
 be
 interested
 in
 investing
 in
 a
 new—
 
  GORRELL.
  What
 letter?
 
  EVERSON.
  I
 sent
 him
 a
 letter.
 
  PHILO.
  It
 was
 in
 response
 to
 my
 letter.
 
  GORRELL.
  Which
 said?
 


  19
 
  PHILO.
  That
 I
 was
 seeking
 investors
 for
 an
 idea
 I
 have
 for
 something
 that
 would
 transmit
 pictures
  through
 the
 air.
 
  GORRELL
 (turning
 to
 EVERSON).
  Are
 you
 losing
 your
 mind?
 
  PHILO.
  If
 it
 helps,
 I
 can
 tell
 you
 that
 sound
 would
 be
 synchronized
 and
 transmitted
 simultaneously.
 
  GORRELL.
  Would
 it?
 
  PHILO.
  Yes.
 
  GORRELL
 (to
 EVERSON).
  And
 you
 wrote
 back
 saying?
 
  EVERSON.
  That
 it
 sounded
 very
 interesting.
 
  GORRELL.
  Ok,
 let’s
 stop
 here,
 ‘cause—
 
  EVERSON.
  We
 always
 talk
 about
 maybe
 getting
 involved
 in
 an
 endeavor.
 
  GORRELL
 (to
 PHILO).
  What
 is
 it
 you
 want
 to
 do?
 
  PHILO.
  I
 want
 to
 transmit
 moving
 images
 electronically
 through
 the
 air,
 capture
 them
 again
 in
 a
  cathode
 ray
 tube
 and
 then
 project
 them
 onto
 a
 screen
 in
 your
 house.
 
  GORRELL
 looks
 at
 EVERSON.
 
  EVERSON.
  Why
 not?
 
  GORRELL.
  Because
 I
 didn’t
 understand
 a
 fucking
 word
 this
 kid
 just
 said
 and
 neither
 did
 you.
 
  EVERSON.
  So
 let’s
 hear
 him
 say
 more.
 
  GORRELL.
  Why?
 


  20
 
  PHILO.
  ‘Cause
 while
 you’re
 listening
 I’m
 gonna
 fix
 your
 car.
 
  SARNOFF.
  And
 he
 did.
 
  I.
 6
 The
 Street
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 have
 no
 reason
 not
 to
 believe
 his
 biographers
 when
 they
 say
 he
 started
 the
 car.
 
  PHILO.
  Which
 is
 probably
 more
 than
 we
 can
 say
 for
 the
 Titanic
 story.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Excuse
 me?
 
  PHILO.
  Wanamaker’s
 has
 never
 been
 open
 on
 Sunday.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Listen,
 I’m
 the
 world’s
 first
 communications
 mogul,
 you
 don’t
 think
 we
 fucking
 knew
 how
  to
 get
 into
 our—never
 mind.
 There
 were
 712
 survivors,
 you
 want
 me
 to
 name
 ‘em?
  Meriweather,
 Cooley,
 Dobson,
 Dotson,
 Winslow—Philo,
 there’s
 no
 reason
 for
 me
 to
 make
  this
 shit
 up.
 
  PHILO.
  I
 also
 adjusted
 the
 carburetor.
 
  EVERSON.
  Your
 letter
 said
 you
 were
 in
 the
 Navy.
 
  PHILO.
  Yes,
 sir.
 
  EVERSON.
  Why’d
 you
 leave?
 
  PHILO.
  Anything
 you
 invent
 while
 you’re
 in
 the
 Navy
 belongs
 to
 the
 Navy.
 
  EVERSON.
  So
 how
 does
 this
 idea
 of
 yours
 work?
 
  PHILO.
  It’s
 been
 demonstrated
 repeatedly
 that
 electrons
 can
 be
 influenced
 to
 travel
 in
 a
 beam
 if
  they’re
 shot
 through
 a
 vacuum
 and
 aimed
 with
 a
 properly
 shaped
 magnetic
 field.
 Did
 any
 of
  that
 mean
 anything
 to
 either
 one
 of
 you?
 


  21
 
  GORRELL.
  No.
 
  EVERSON.
  Sure.
 
  GORRELL.
  Shut
 up.
 
  PHILO.
  A
 glass
 vacuum
 tube.
 Now
 the
 beam
 of
 electrons
 is
 aimed
 at
 lines
 of
 phosphor
 dots.
  Magnetic
 fields
 of
 precise
 shape,
 strength,
 and
 duration.
 
  GORRELL.
  I
 understood
 the
 words
 “tube”
 and
 “dots.”
 
  PHILO.
  Let’s
 start
 from
 the
 beginning.
 An
 electron
 behaves
 in
 the
 following
 manner—
 
  GORRELL.
  You’re
 saying
 that
 you
 can
 send
 a
 photograph
 from
 here
 to
 there
 electronically?
 
  PHILO.
  I
 can
 but
 that’s
 not
 what
 I’m
 saying.
 I’m
 saying
 I
 can
 send
 a
 live
 moving
 image
 from
 here
 to
  there
 electronically.
 
  GORRELL.
  Well
 I
 wouldn’t
 say
 it
 out
 loud
 to
 that
 many
 people,
 but
 for
 the
 sake
 of
 amusing
 myself,
 how
  far
 and
 how
 fast?
 
  PHILO.
  As
 far
 as
 you
 want
 and
 roughly
 at
 the
 speed
 of
 light.
 
  GORRELL.
  We
 don’t
 have
 $20,
 000.
 
  EVERSON.
  We
 don’t.
 We
 don’t
 have
 $20,000,
 but
 we
 do
 have
 $3000
 earmarked—
 
  GORRELL.
  George—
 
  EVERSON.
  Leslie,
 for
 an
 endeavor.
 
  PHILO.
  Well
 $3000
 would—
 
 


  22
  GORRELL.
  No.
 
  EVERSON.
  I
 say
 we
 take
 him
 to
 see
 Crocker.
 
  GORRELL.
  No.
 
  EVERSON.
  Crocker
 likes
 science.
 He
 loves
 science.
 He
 funded
 the
 radiation
 lab
 up
 there
 where
 they’re
  doing
 cancer
 research.
 
  GORRELL
 (to
 PHILO).
  Your
 thing.
 What
 are
 you
 calling
 it?
 
  PHILO.
  Television.
 It’s
 from
 the
 Greek
 word
 for—
 
  GORRELL.
  Does
 it
 prevent
 cancer?
 
  PHILO.
  No.
 
  GORRELL
 (to
 EVERSON).
  Then
 no.
 
  EVERSON.
  We’re
 going
 there
 anyway.
 We
 take
 him
 with
 us
 and
 arrange
 a
 meeting.
 
  GORRELL
 (to
 PHILO).
  You
 fixed
 our
 car.
 And
 you
 know
 a
 lot
 of
 big
 words,
 most
 of
 which
 I
 think
 you’re
 making
 up,
  but
 I’ll
 spring
 for
 a
 train
 ticket
 and
 arrange
 the
 meeting.
 
  EVERSON.
  Great.
 
  GORRELL.
  And
 that’s
 it.
 
 
  PHILO.
  Where
 are
 we
 going?
 
  EVERSON.
  San
 Francisco
 to
 see
 William
 Crocker.
 
 
 


  23
  I.
 7
 Meeting
 Room
 
  SARNOFF.
  Everson
 and
 Gorrell
 knew
 Crocker
 ‘cause
 he
 was
 a
 regional
 director
 for
 Community
 Chest
  and
 he’d
 made
 a
 hobby
 out
 of
 funding
 scientific
 research.
 
 He
 could
 afford
 to
 do
 it
 ‘cause
 he
  was
 also
 the
 president
 of
 Crocker
 First
 National
 Bank.
 Oh,
 and
 his
 family
 built
 the
 Union-­‐ Pacific
 Railroad.
 
  PHILO
 is
 making
 his
 presentation
 to
 CROCKER
 and
 a
 couple
 of
 his
 DEPUTIES,
 along
 with
  EVERSON
 and
 GORRELL.
 He
 stands
 in
 front
 of
 a
 large
 chalkboard,
 filled
 from
 edge
 to
 edge
  with
 various
 diagrams.
 
  SARNOFF.
  He’d
 been
 given
 strict
 instructions
 by
 Gorrell
 to
 keep
 it
 short.
 Try
 for
 15
 minutes
 but
 no
  more
 than
 20.
 He
 began
 his
 presentation
 at
 exactly
 10
 AM
 and
 finished
 it
 at
 ten
 minutes
  past
 two.
 
  PHILO.
  Now,
 I
 need
 lab
 space,
 a
 work
 table,
 a
 glassblower,
 and
 a
 high
 quality
 vacuum
 pump.
 I’ll
  need
 to
 make
 precision
 tools.
 (pause)
 Any
 questions.
 
  ATKINS.
  The
 signal
 can
 only
 travel
 in
 a
 straight
 line,
 right?
 
  PHILO.
  Yes.
 
  ATKINS.
  How
 do
 you
 account
 for
 tall
 buildings,
 mountains,
 or
 the
 curvature
 of
 the
 Earth
 for
 that
  matter?
 
  PHILO.
  I
 could
 bounce
 the
 signal
 off
 a
 series
 of
 stationary
 balloons.
 
  WILKINS.
  Who
 else
 is
 working
 on
 television?
 
  PHILO.
  There
 are
 five
 others
 that
 I
 know
 of.
 Paul
 Nipkow
 in
 Germany,
 John
 Logie
 Baird
 in
 England,
  Herbert
 Ives
 at
 the
 Bell
 Lab,
 Ernst
 Alexanderson
 at
 GE,
 and
 a
 Russian
 named
 Vladimir
  Zworykin
 who’s
 working
 at
 the
 Westinghouse
 Labs
 in
 Pittsburgh.
 
  ATKINS.
  Aren’t
 you
 afraid
 they’re
 gonna
 beat
 you
 to
 it?
 
  PHILO.
  No.
 
 
 


  24
  WILKINS.
  Why
 not?
 
  SARNOFF
 (to
 audience).
  Because
 they
 were
 working
 on
 mechanical
 television,
 which
 involved
 spinning
 a
 wheel
 that
  had
 tiny
 holes
 in
 it.
 The
 problem
 was
 that
 to
 spin
 it
 fast
 enough
 to
 do
 anything
 you’d
 need
  an
 engine
 you
 could
 run
 at
 the
 Formula
 One
 Grand
 Prix
 of
 Monaco.
 Mechanical
 television
  wasn’t
 going
 to
 work
 and
 Farnsworth
 knew
 that
 and
 that’s
 why
 he
 was
 working
 on
  electronic
 television,
 which
 Zworykin
 and
 the
 rest
 of
 the
 team
 told
 me
 was
 never
 gonna
  work
 but
 which
 obviously
 did.
 Yeah,
 my
 guys
 may
 have
 called
 that
 putt
 a
 little
 early.
 
  ATKINS.
  You’ve
 just
 named
 five
 of
 the
 best
 minds
 in
 electricity.
 
  PHILO.
  Yes
 sir,
 I’m
 surprised
 they’re
 sticking
 with
 it.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Oh
 fuck
 off.
 
  WILKINS.
  Didn’t
 Zworykin
 file
 a
 patent
 application
 for
 an
 electronic
 system
 a
 while
 back.
 
  SARNOFF.
  That’s
 right.
 
  PHILO.
  Yes,
 four
 years
 ago.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Four
 years
 ago.
 
  WILKINS.
  Why
 wasn’t
 it
 granted?
 
  PHILO.
  It
 doesn’t
 work.
 
  SARNOFF.
  It
 doesn’t
 matter.
 
  WILKINS.
  Why
 didn’t
 it
 work?
 
  PHILO.
  You’ve
 gotta
 scan
 the
 image
 and
 break
 it
 down
 into
 lines,
 that’s
 how
 it’s
 gonna
 happen.
  (pause)
 Any
 more
 questions?
 
 
 


  25
  ATKINS.
  Mr.
 Crocker?
 
  CROCKER.
  Do
 you
 play
 a
 musical
 instrument?
 
  PHILO.
  I’m
 sorry?
 
  CROCKER.
  Do
 you
 play
 a
 musical
 instrument
 of
 any
 kind?
 
  PHILO.
  I
 play
 the
 violin.
 
  CROCKER.
  No
 kidding,
 me
 too.
 (beat)
 Not
 well.
 My
 dad
 taught
 me
 a
 few
 songs
 when
 I
 was
 a
 kid.
 Turkey
  in
 the
 Straw,
 that
 sort
 of
 thing.
 You
 know,
 I
 never
 practiced
 much
 but
 I
 liked
 the
 lessons.
  Son,
 if
 you
 go
 out
 that
 door
 and
 make
 a
 left,
 that’s
 my
 office.
 Would
 you
 wait
 there
 while
 we
  talk?
 
  PHILO.
  Yes
 sir.
 
  CROCKER.
  There’s
 a
 violin
 back
 there.
 Feel
 free
 to
 fiddle
 around
 if
 you
 get
 bored.
 
  PHILO.
  Thank
 you.
 
  PHILO
 exits.
 
  ATKINS.
  He’s
 not
 particularly
 credentialed
 in
 the
 field.
 
  CROCKER.
  No
 one’s
 credentialed
 in
 the
 field.
 
  WILKINS.
  What
 he’s
 suggesting
 defies
 intuition.
 
  (Silence)
 
  EVERSON.
  Why
 did
 you
 ask
 him
 if
 he
 played
 an
 instrument?
 
 
 
 
 


  26
  CROCKER.
  I’m
 just
 struck
 by
 the
 number
 of
 times
 people
 who
 are
 this
 gifted
 in
 math
 and
 science
 also
  play
 music.
 I
 don’t
 know,
 they
 look
 at
 a
 staff,
 they
 look
 at
 an
 instrument,
 it
 just
 makes
 sense
  to
 them,
 they
 get
 it.
  (beat)
  All
 right,
 here’s
 what
 I’m
 gonna
 do.
 I’m
 gonna
 give
 him
 the
 money.
 Half.
 Ten
 thousand
  dollars
 for
 the
 first
 six
 months.
 But
 he’s
 gotta
 transmit
 a
 picture.
 If
 he
 does,
 he
 gets
 what
 he
  needs.
 If
 he
 doesn’t,
 we
 shake
 hands
 and
 say
 better
 luck
 another
 day.
 Leslie,
 why
 don’t
 you
  go
 get
 him?
 
  ATKINS.
  Hang
 on,
 Les.
 Bill,
 say
 it
 does
 work—and
 setting
 aside
 that
 at
 the
 moment
 a
 home
 television
  system
 that
 may
 or
 may
 not
 work
 retails
 for
 $10,000—what
 do
 you
 imagine
 the
 practical
  application
 being?
 
 
  WILKINS.
  To
 say
 nothing
 of
 the
 marketable
 one?
 
  CROCKER.
  The
 practical
 and
 marketable
 applications
 of
 owning
 the
 patent
 on
 a
 device
 that
 would
  allow
 anyone
 access
 to
 all
 visual
 information
 in
 the
 world?
 I’m
 sure
 we’ll
 think
 of
  something.
 Les,
 go
 get
 the
 kid.
 
  GORRELL
 starts
 to
 head
 off
 but
 gets
 stopped
 by
 the
 sound
 of
 a
 Tchaikovsky
 violin
 concerto
  being
 played.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Yeah,
 turns
 out
 Farnsworth
 was
 also
 a
 concert
 level
 violinist.
 
  GORRELL.
  Mr.
 Crocker.
 
  CROCKER.
  Yeah.
 
  GORRELL.
  Everson
 and
 I
 are
 in
 for
 $3000.
 
 
  I.
 8
 Outside
 Pem’s
 House
 
  SARNOFF.
  It
 was
 after
 midnight
 when
 the
 train
 pulled
 into
 Provo,
 but
 he
 got
 his
 car
 and
 drove
 straight
  to
 the
 house
 of
 Elma
 Gardner,
 who
 everyone
 called
 Pem,
 and
 began
 scouring
 the
 ground
 for
  a
 couple
 of
 small
 pebbles.
 
 
  PHILO
 (drunk,
 muttering
 to
 himself).
  Solder
 and
 a
 soldering
 iron.
 Filament,
 filament,
 filament,
 filament,
 some
 kind
 of
 filament
  wires…
 


  27
 
  SARNOFF.
  He’d
 been
 in
 love
 with
 Pem
 for
 the
 six
 months
 since
 she
 scolded
 him
 for
 talking
 to
 a
 group
  of
 kids
 at
 her
 church
 about
 electro-­‐magnets
 instead
 of
 talking
 to
 them
 about
 how
 Jesus
 had
  once
 lived
 in
 Utah.
 When
 she
 asked
 him
 why
 he’d
 changed
 the
 topic,
 he
 said
 he
 thought
  there
 was
 little
 evidence
 to
 support
 her
 theory.
 She
 smacked
 him.
 And
 then
 she
 kissed
 him.
  And
 I
 imagine
 he’s
 been
 confused
 ever
 since.
 
  PHILO
 (to
 himself).
  Varnish,
 I’m
 gonna
 need—coil
 wires.
 Copper.
 These
 things
 are
 gonna
 heat
 up,
 it’s
 gonna
  matter
 what
 kind
 of
 varnish.
 
  SARNOFF.
  She
 thought
 he
 was
 crazy
 but
 she
 wanted
 to
 be
 with
 him
 no
 matter
 what
 absurd
 future
 he
  had
 in
 mind
 for
 electrons.
 
  PHILO.
  The
 most
 important
 thing?
 Your
 relationship
 with
 a
 glassblower.
 And
 how
 many
 people
 can
  say
 that?
 
  He
 tosses
 a
 pebble
 at
 a
 second
 floor
 window.
 
  PHILO
 (quietly).
  Pem.
 
  He
 tosses
 another
 pebble.
 
  PHILO.
  Pem.
 
  The
 window
 opens
 and
 a
 tired
 MAN
 sticks
 his
 head
 out.
 
  MR.
 GARDNER.
  Philo?
 
  PHILO.
  Mr.
 Gardner.
 
  MR.
 GARDNER.
  Whatcha
 doin’
 out
 there,
 son?
 
  PHILO.
  I’m
 sorry,
 sir.
 I’m
 turned
 around.
 I
 thought
 that
 was
 Pem’s
 window.
 
  MR.
 GARDNER.
  It’s
 pretty
 late.
 
  MRS.
 GARDNER
 joins
 her
 husband
 at
 the
 window.
 
 


  MRS.
 GARDNER.
  Philo?
 
  PHILO.
  Good
 evening,
 Mrs.
 Gardner.
 Sorry
 to
 wake
 you
 up.
 
  MRS.
 GARDNER.
  Don’t
 be
 silly,
 dear.
 How
 did
 it
 go
 in
 San
 Francisco?
 
  PHILO.
  It
 went
 very
 well.
 I
 just
 got
 back
 and
 I
 was
 hoping
 to
 speak
 to
 Pem.
 
  The
 front
 door
 opens
 and
 PEM
 comes
 out
 in
 a
 robe.
 
  PEM.
  Philo—
 
  PHILO.
  Pem.
 
  PEM.
  Shhh…
 
  PHILO.
  Guess
 what,
 I
 parked
 right
 on
 your
 lawn.
 
  PEM.
  Philo—
 
  PHILO.
  Wait,
 that’s
 not
 good.
 
  PEM.
  Are
 you
 drunk?
 
  PHILO.
  Yeah,
 a
 little
 bit.
 We
 had
 some
 drinks
 on
 the
 train.
 Look—
 
  PEM
 (calling
 up
 to
 window).
  Mom,
 dad,
 it’s
 ok.
 Go
 to
 bed.
 
  MRS.
 GARDNER.
  There’s
 chicken
 in
 the
 ice
 box.
 
  PHILO.
  Thank
 you,
 ma’am.
 
  PEM.
  This
 is
 Provo,
 Utah.
 

28
 


  29
 
  PHILO.
  How
 come
 anytime
 you’re
 mad
 at
 me
 you
 tell
 me
 where
 I
 live?
 
  PEM.
  Because
 this
 is
 Provo,
 Utah.
 
  PHILO.
  I
 know
 that,
 Pem,
 my
 mail
 is
 delivered
 here.
 
  PEM.
  And
 since
 you’ve
 driven
 up
 on
 our
 lawn,
 drunk,
 at
 one
 in
 the
 morning
 and
 thrown
 rocks
 at
  my
 parents,
 is
 there
 anything
 else
 I
 do
 that
 annoys
 you?
 
  PHILO.
  You
 will
 leave
 a
 cigarette
 burning
 in
 the
 ashtray
 without
 putting
 it
 out.
 So
 a
 trail
 of
 smoke
  just
 kind
 of
 curls
 up
 to
 the
 ceiling
 for
 what
 seems
 like
 forever.
 That
 doesn’t
 bother
 you?
 
  PEM.
  Not
 as
 much
 as
 you
 telling
 me
 about
 it.
 
  PHILO.
  Well,
 just
 put
 the
 cigarette
 out
 with
 commitment.
 
  PEM.
  Why
 are
 you
 here
 right
 now?
 
  PHILO.
  I
 have
 two
 reasons
 and
 they’re
 both
 pretty
 good.
 The
 first
 is
 that
 Crocker’s
 gonna
 finance
  me.
 
  PEM.
  (pause)
 What?
 
  PHILO.
  I’m
 gonna
 build
 it,
 he’s
 gonna
 finance
 me.
 
  PEM.
  Oh
 my!
 
  PHILO.
  Ten
 thousand
 dollars
 but
 I
 have
 to
 get
 a
 picture
 in
 six
 months
 or
 that’s
 it.
 
  PEM.
  Are
 you
 joking?
 Is
 this
 a
 joke?
 ‘Cause
 your
 jokes
 are
 stupid,
 Philo.
 
  PHILO.
  It’s
 real.
 And
 my
 jokes
 are
 simply
 way
 ahead
 of
 their
 time.
 Years
 from
 now
 you’re
 gonna
  remember
 one
 of
 my
 jokes
 and
 you’re
 gonna
 laugh,
 and
 you’re
 gonna—
 


  30
 
  PEM.
  You’re
 going
 to
 San
 Francisco?
 
  PHILO.
  Yeah.
 I’m
 gonna
 need
 your
 brother
 to
 come
 with
 me
 and
 help.
 
 And
 my
 sister.
 
  PEM.
  They’re
 gonna
 be
 thrilled
 when
 they
 hear
 the
 news.
 They’re
 gonna
 be—I
 mean—I
 can’t
  believe
 it.
 
  PHILO.
  Neither
 can
 I.
 
  PEM.
  What
 was
 the
 second
 one?
 
  PHILO.
  The
 second
 one?
 
  PEM.
  You
 said
 there
 were
 two
 reasons
 you
 were
 here,
 what
 was
 the
 second
 one?
 
  PHILO.
  (beat)
 I
 don’t
 remember.
 
  PEM.
  That’s
 because
 you’ve
 been
 drinking
 and
 we’re
 in
 Provo,
 Utah,
 and—
 
  PHILO.
  I
 know
 where
 we
 are,
 can
 we
 prioritize?
 
  PEM.
  Fine.
 
  PHILO.
  My
 point
 is
 this:
 I
 will
 be
 working
 all
 the
 time.
 I
 mean,
 I
 have
 six
 months
 to
 build
 the
 image
  dissector
 and
 the
 receiver
 so
 I’ll
 be
 in
 the
 lab
 the
 whole
 time
 with—
 
  PEM
 (the
 proud
 girlfriend)
  You’re
 gonna
 have
 your
 own
 lab!
 
  PHILO.
  And
 I
 figure,
 we’ll
 still
 be
 together
 in
 San
 Francisco.
 I
 mean
 we’ll
 be
 together.
 We’d
 have
 a
  small
 apartment
 and
 I’ll
 have
 a
 small
 salary,
 but
 we
 could—
 
  PEM.
  Wait
 a
 second.
 
 


  PHILO.
  Sure.
 
  PEM.
  Why
 will
 I
 be
 in
 San
 Francisco?
 
  PHILO.
  (beat)
 Okay,
 now
 I
 remember
 what
 the
 second
 one
 was.
 
  PEM.
  (beat)
 You’re
 asking
 me
 to
 marry
 you?
 
  PHILO.
  Yes,
 I’m—yes.
 I’m—yes,
 I
 am.
 
  PEM.
  Well…?
 
  PHILO.
  What?
 
  PEM.
  ASK!
 
  PHILO.
  Will
 you
 marr—
 
  PEM.
  Yes!
 
  PEM
 throws
 her
 arms
 around
 PHILO
 and
 kisses
 him.
 
  PEM.
  Wait.
 When
 does
 the
 six
 months
 start?
 
  PHILO.
  Now.
 We’re
 gonna
 leave
 in
 the
 morning.
 And
 we’re
 gonna
 need
 your
 mom’s
 chicken.
 
 
  I.
 9
 RCA
 Party
 
  HARBORD
 (making
 a
 toast).
  To
 the
 Patent
 Pool!
 
  ALL.
  Here
 here!
 
  PHILO.
 

31
 


  32
  A
 party
 at
 the
 Union
 Club
 celebrating
 the
 formation
 of
 the
 patent
 pool—a
 business
  arrangement
 between
 RCA,
 AT&T,
 and
 Westinghouse.
 Sarnoff
 hated
 being
 in
 business
 with
  AT&T
 because
 he
 hated
 the
 company’s
 CFO,
 Walter
 Gifford.
 That’s
 what’s
 gonna
 matter
  later,
 but
 for
 now
 Sarnoff
 is
 consumed
 with
 giving
 people
 a
 reason
 to
 own
 a
 radio.
 
  BETTY
 comes
 up
 to
 SARNOFF.
 
  BETTY.
  Excuse
 me,
 Mr.
 Sarnoff?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Yeah.
 
  BETTY.
  I’m
 Betty
 Jordan.
 I’m
 from
 the
 GE
 secretarial
 pool
 and
 they’ve
 assigned
 me
 to
 work
 with
  your
 group.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Great.
 Do
 you
 know
 anything
 about
 prize-­‐fighting?
 
  BETTY.
  I’m
 sorry?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Boxing.
 
  BETTY.
  No
 sir.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Bone
 up
 on
 boxing.
 Four
 weeks
 from
 now
 we’re
 gonna
 broadcast
 a
 heavyweight
 title
 bout
  from
 Jersey
 City
 between
 Jack
 Dempsey
 and
 a
 Frenchman
 named
 Georges
 Carpentier.
 The
  signal’s
 gonna
 travel
 over
 500
 miles,
 that’s
 West
 Virginia,
 Ohio,
 Deleware.
 We’ve
 gotta
 get
  some
 radio
 sets
 where
 the
 people
 are.
 That’s
 what
 we’ll
 be
 working
 on
 for
 a
 while.
 7
 AM
  tomorrow?
 
  BETTY.
  Yes
 sir.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Welcome
 to
 radio.
 
  BETTY.
  Thank
 you,
 sir.
 
  HARBORD.
  David.
 
 
 


  33
  SARNOFF.
  Yes.
 
  HARBORD.
  I
 had
 lunch
 with
 Walter
 Gifford
 in
 the
 back
 room
 at
 Delmonico’s.
 He
 tells
 me
 you’re
 giving
  his
 station
 manager
 a
 hard
 time
 over
 25
 bucks.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Jim,
 Walter
 Gifford
 runs
 his
 radio
 station
 like
 a
 whore
 house.
 
  HARBORD.
  You’d
 think
 it’d
 be
 more
 popular
 then,
 wouldn’t
 you?
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 wish
 it
 were
 a
 joke.
 His
 guy
 is
 on
 the
 air
 telling
 us
 it’s
 probably
 gonna
 rain
 on
 Friday.
 Then
  two
 minutes
 later
 he’s
 telling
 us
 to
 remember
 our
 umbrellas,
 and
 if
 we
 don’t
 have
 one
 we
  can
 pick
 one
 up
 at
 this
 place
 on
 Queens
 Boulevard.
 I
 do
 some
 checking
 and,
 yeah,
 the
 guy
  on
 the
 air
 got
 25
 bucks
 from
 the
 place
 in
 Queens
 to
 say
 the
 name
 of
 their
 store
 and
 he
 did
 it
  another
 two
 times
 in
 the
 hour.
 
  HARBORD.
  What’s
 the
 problem?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Well
 first
 of
 all,
 now
 I
 don’t
 know
 if
 it’s
 really
 gonna
 rain
 on
 Friday
 or
 not.
 
  HARBORD.
  A
 hundred
 people
 were
 listening.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Gimme
 three
 years,
 it’ll
 be
 a
 hundred
 million
 and
 then—
 
  HARBORD.
  Enjoy
 the
 party,
 David.
 It’s
 a
 party.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Credibility
 can’t
 be
 regained.
 You
 lose
 it
 and
 you’re
 in
 the
 circus.
 
  HARBORD.
  I
 like
 the
 circus.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Everybody
 likes
 the
 circus,
 that’s
 not
 the—ah
 fuck
 it.
 
  HARBORD
 has
 moved
 away.
 LIZETTE,
 SARNOFF’s
 wife,
 has
 come
 up
 behind
 him
 with
 two
  drinks.
 
  LIZETTE.
  Watch
 your
 language,
 Mr.
 Sarnoff.
 


  34
 
  SARNOFF.
  I’m
 sorry,
 honey,
 I
 didn’t
 see
 you
 there.
 I
 was
 talking
 to
 Jim.
 
  LIZETTE.
  You
 were
 angry.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Walter
 Gifford
 is
 allowing
 people
 to
 pay
 money
 to
 advertise
 during
 informational
  programming.
 
  LIZETTE.
  How
 long
 is
 this
 feud
 going
 to
 go
 on?
 
  SARNOFF.
  17
 years.
 
  LIZETTE.
  Why?
 
  PHILO
 (to
 audience).
  U.S.
 patents
 last
 17
 years.
 
  LIZETTE.
  My
 darling,
 advertising
 during
 informational
 programming
 is
 not
 the
 reason
 you
 don’t
 like
  Walter
 Gifford.
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 promise
 you
 Liz,
 it’s
 business
 and
 nothing
 else.
 
  LIZETTE.
  I’ve
 been
 talking
 to
 Tatiana
 Zworykin.
 Her
 husband
 is
 working
 on
 a
 kinescope.
 
  SARNOFF.
  That’s
 right.
 
  LIZETTE.
  What’s
 a
 kinescope?
 
  SARNOFF.
  It’s…well
 I
 guess
 you’d
 have
 to
 call
 it—what—a
 television
 receiver.
 It’s
 like
 a
 radio
 receiver
  but
 instead
 of
 receiving
 a
 sound
 wave,
 it
 receives
 a
 light
 image.
 Also,
 it
 doesn’t
 work.
 
  LIZETTE.
  What
 do
 you
 mean
 it
 receives
 a
 light
 image?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Just
 what
 it
 sounds
 like.
 
 


  35
  LIZETTE.
  You’re
 trying
 to
 transmit
 a
 picture?
 
  SARNOFF.
  I’m
 not.
 Zworykin
 is,
 and
 some
 guys
 in
 Europe,
 but
 it
 doesn’t
 work.
 
  LIZETTE.
  You
 mean
 project
 an
 image.
 
  SARNOFF.
  No
 I
 mean
 transmit
 an
 image.
 You’d
 be
 standing
 in
 another
 room
 and
 you
 could
 watch
 a
  kinescope
 and
 see
 this
 party.
 
  LIZETTE.
  That’s
 incredible.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Except
 for
 one
 thing.
 
  LIZETTE.
  What?
 
  SARNOFF.
  It
 doesn’t
 work.
 
  LIZETTE.
  Will
 it?
 
  SARNOFF.
  What.
 
  LIZETTE.
  Work.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Television?
 
  LIZETTE.
  Yes.
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 don’t
 see
 how,
 but
 if
 television
 gets
 invented
 it’s
 not
 gonna
 get
 invented
 by
 a
 guy
 at
  Westinghouse,
 it’s
 gonna
 get
 invented
 by
 RCA.
 
 
  I.
 10
 Green
 Street
 Lab
 
  PHILO.
  Cliffy!
 


  36
 
  CLIFF.
  Phil.
 Hey,
 Pem.
 Hey,
 Agnes.
 We’ve
 been
 sweeping
 up
 the
 place.
 Welcome
 to
 your
 lab.
 
  STAN.
  Mr.
 Farnsworth,
 I’m
 Stan
 Willis
 from
 Cal
 Tech.
 Mr.
 Crocker’s
 office
 hired
 me
 to
 help
 you.
 
  PHILO.
  Well,
 I
 take
 all
 the
 help
 you
 can
 spare.
 When
 did
 you
 graduate?
 
  STAN.
  I
 haven’t.
 I’m
 a
 junior,
 they’re
 giving
 me
 class
 credit.
 
  PHILO.
  Okay.
 This
 is
 my
 wife,
 Pem.
 
  PEM.
  Nice
 to
 meet
 you.
 
  STAN.
  Ma-­‐am.
 
  PHILO.
  And
 that’s
 my
 sister
 Agnes.
 
  STAN.
  How
 do
 you
 do?
 
  AGNES.
  Nice
 to
 meet
 you.
 
  CLIFF.
  How
 did
 I
 beat
 you
 here?
 
  AGNES
  We
 had
 car
 trouble.
 
  CLIFF.
  What
 happened?
 
  PHILO.
  Agnes
 drove
 into
 a
 salt
 flat.
 
  AGNES.
  You
 were
 yammering
 about
 birdseed.
 
  PHILO.
  I
 was
 yammering
 about
 Birdseye.
 Clarence
 Birdseye.
 Stan,
 did
 you
 see
 in
 the
 paper
 today?
 
 


  37
  STAN.
  Yeah.
 
  PHILO.
  Clarence
 Birdseye
 is
 gonna
 freeze
 vegetables.
 Freeze
 them
 in
 an
 instant
 so
 they
 retain
 their
  cellular
 structure.
 
  AGNES.
  And
 who
 cares?
 
  PHILO.
  Anyone
 who
 eats
 food.
 
  CLIFF
 (to
 PEM).
  Should
 I
 ask
 him
 now?
 
  PEM.
  Go
 ahead.
 
  PHILO.
  What?
 
  CLIFF.
  Pem
 said
 you
 were
 gonna
 need
 glass
 tubes
 and
 since
 money’s
 tight
 I
 thought
 I
 could
 teach
  myself
 how
 to
 make
 them
 and
 maybe
 cut
 the
 expense
 of
 a
 glassblower.
 (beat)
 I
 want
 to
 be
 a
  part
 of
 this,
 Philo.
 
 
  PHILO.
  You
 are
 gonna
 be
 part
 ot
 it.
 
  CLIFF.
  I’m
 not
 smart
 enough
 to—
 
  PHILO.
  You’re
 plenty
 smart.
 
  CLIFF.
  I
 can
 learn
 how
 to
 make
 glass
 tubes.
 
  AGNES.
  Glassblowing
 is
 hard!
 
  PHILO.
  And
 it’s
 dangerous.
 These
 guys
 apprentice
 for
 a
 long
 time
 and
 I’m
 looking
 for
 them
 to
 make
  me
 one
 that’s
 gonna
 be
 hard
 to
 make.
 
  HARLAN
 HONN
 enters
 
 
 


  38
  HARLAN.
  Mr.
 Farnsworth?
 
  PHILO.
  Yes?
 
  HARLAN.
  I’m
 Harlan
 Honn,
 I’m
 in
 the
 lab
 next
 door.
 
  PHILO.
  Nice
 to
 meet
 you.
 
  HARLAN.
  I’m
 working
 on
 new
 methods
 of
 refrigeration.
 
  PHILO.
  What’s
 wrong
 with
 the
 old
 methods?
 
  HARLAN.
  If
 it
 leaks,
 there’s
 a
 risk
 to
 consumers.
 They
 might
 die
 from
 the
 poisonous
 gas
 that’s
  emitted.
 
  PHILO.
  Well
 you
 better
 work
 on
 that
 then.
 Hey,
 Stan,
 do
 you
 have
 a
 place
 to
 live?
 
  STAN.
  I
 was
 just
 gonna
 get
 a
 room
 down
 at
 the
 Y.
 
  PHILO.
  We’re
 gonna
 rent
 an
 apartment
 across
 the
 Bay,
 why
 don’t
 you
 stay
 with
 us
 and
 save
 a
  couple
 of
 bucks.
 
  STAN.
  Gee,
 thanks.
 
  PHILO
 (to
 PEM).
  Is
 that
 ok?
 
  PEM.
  You
 betcha,
 Philo.
 Just
 me,
 you,
 my
 brother,
 your
 sister
 and
 a
 junior
 from
 Cal
 Tech.
 Aggie,
  let’s
 go
 find
 a
 four
 bedroom
 apartment
 for
 30
 dollars
 a
 month.
 
  AGNES.
  Oh,
 sure.
 You
 bet.
 
  PHILO.
  Hey,
 see
 if
 you
 can
 find
 one
 that
 has
 a
 nice
 view
 of
 the—
 
 
 


  39
  PEM
 &
 AGNES.
  Shut
 up.
 
  PHILO.
  You
 bet.
 
  PEM
 and
 AGNES
 exit.
 
  HARLAN.
  Well
 if
 you
 need
 anything
 I’m
 in
 the
 lab
 next
 door.
 If
 you
 need
 any
 equipment
 or
 another
  pair
 of
 hands.
 
  PHILO.
  It
 wouldn’t
 distract
 you
 from
 what
 you’re
 doing?
 
  HARLAN.
  Refrigeration?
 Please,
 distract
 me.
 
  HARLAN
 exits.
 
  PHILO.
  Okay,
 Stan,
 what
 do
 you
 know
 about
 moving
 pictures?
 
  STAN.
  I
 know
 a
 film
 projector
 has
 to
 move
 a
 series
 of
 photographs
 past
 the
 human
 eye
 at
 a
 speed
  of
 16
 frames
 per
 second
 to
 fool
 the
 brain
 into
 thinking
 it’s
 watching
 fluid
 movement.
 
  PHILO.
  Yeah.
 We’re
 gonna
 try
 something
 a
 little
 different.
 Stan,
 you
 go
 get
 us
 a
 generator,
 Cliff
 and
 I
  are
 gonna
 start
 building
 a
 lab.
 
  SARNOFF.
  So
 now
 he’s
 got
 his
 team.
 His
 brother-­‐in-­‐law,
 his
 sister,
 a
 19-­‐year-­‐old
 college
 kid
 and
 a
  refrigerator
 repairman.
 I
 mention
 this
 because
 50
 PhD’s
 at
 Bell,
 AT&T
 and
 Westinghouse
  told
 me
 that
 what
 was
 about
 to
 happen
 was
 impossible.
 
 
  I.
 11
 Patent
 Office/Lab
 
  Farnsworth’s
 Lab
 is
 assembled
 by
 PHILO,
 CLIFF,
 STAN,
 HARLAN,
 PEM
 and
 AGNES
 while
  several
 actors
 recite
 sections
 of
 PHILO’s
 patent
 application.
 
  ACTOR
 1.
  United
 States
 Patent
 Application
 1-­‐773-­‐980
 made
 by
 Philo
 T.
 Farnsworth
 of
 Berkley,
  California.
 
  ACTOR
 2.
  This
 apparatus
 relates
 to
 the
 apparatus
 and
 process
 for
 the
 transmission
 of
 a
 moving
 image
  to
 a
 distance.
 


  40
 
  ACTOR
 3.
  The
 transmission
 is
 by
 electricity—
 
  ACTOR
 4.
  Heretofore
 attempts
 have
 been
 made
 to
 transmit
 an
 image.
 These
 prior
 attempts
 have
  generally
 embodied
 a
 method
 or
 apparatus—
 
  ACTOR
 5.
  -­‐-­‐in
 which
 each
 particular
 elemental
 area—
 
  ACTOR
 6.
  -­‐-­‐that
 the
 human
 eye
 will
 retain
 a
 picture
 is
 of
 such
 duration
 that
 the
 conversion
 of
 the
 light
  shades
 the
 original
 image
 of
 the
 object
 to
 electricity
 and
 reconversion
 of
 electricity
 to
  light—
 
  ACTOR
 1.
  -­‐-­‐cross
 section
 of
 such
 electronic
 discharge
 from
 the
 place,
 in
 which
 each
 portion
 of
 the
  cross
 section
 will
 correspond
 in
 electrical
 intensity
 with
 intensity
 of
 light
 imposed
 on—
 
  ACTOR
 3.
  -­‐-­‐developed,
 fluctuating
 in
 intensity
 to
 the
 variations
 in
 light
 current
 transmitted
 without
  the
 necessity—
 
  ACTOR
 2.
  Figure
 2
 is
 a
 diagrammatic
 view
 of
 the
 television
 receiver.
 Figure
 3
 is—
 
  ACTOR
 4.
  Figure
 16
 is
 a
 perspective
 view
 of
 a
 biaxial
 crystal
 showing
 the
 refraction
 of—
 
  ACTOR
 1.
  Figure
 22—
 
  ACTOR
 6.
  Figure
 31—
 
  ACTOR
 5.
  Figure
 45—
 
  SARNOFF.
  In
 testimony
 whereof,
 I
 have
 heretofore
 set
 my
 hand.
 
 
  PHILO.
  Philo
 T.
 Farnsworth.
 (to
 his
 team)
 All
 right,
 let’s
 try
 it.
 
  A
 toggle
 is
 switched
 and
 the
 whole
 thing
 blows
 up
 in
 an
 electrical
 surge.
 CLIFF,
 STAN,
  HARLAN,
 AGNES
 and
 EVERSON
 and
 GORRELL,
 who
 have
 come
 to
 watch
 the
 test,
 all
 jump
  back
 immediately.
 PHILO
 stands
 expressionless.
 HARLAN
 and
 CLIFF
 grab
 buckets
 of
 sand
 and
  throw
 it
 on
 the
 small
 fire
 that’s
 started.
 


  41
 
  STAN.
  It
 was
 a
 power
 surge,
 Philo.
 
  HARLAN.
  It
 was
 the
 generator?
 
  SARNOFF.
  The
 one
 thing
 in
 the
 room
 they
 hadn’t
 built
 from
 scratch.
 
  PHILO.
  It
 was
 the
 generator??
 
  STAN.
  I’m
 sorry,
 sir,
 that
 was
 me.
 
 
  PHILO.
  Don’t
 worry
 about
 it.
 
  GORRELL.
  Don’t
 worry
 about
 it?
 (beat)
 Do
 you
 have
 anything
 to
 show
 for
 our
 money?
 
  PHILO.
  The
 table
 works.
 
  GORRELL.
  You
 have
 five
 weeks
 left.
 
  EVERSON
 and
 GORRELL
 exit.
 
  PHILO.
  All
 right.
 We’ll
 fix
 the
 generator,
 but
 once
 we
 do,
 is
 there
 a
 photoelectric
 material
 that’s
 a
  better
 conductor
 than
 potassium?
 
  HARLAN.
  Sodium.
 
  STAN.
  We
 tried
 sodium.
 
  HARLAN.
  Topaz?
 
  PHILO.
  No.
 
  HARLAN.
  Could
 we
 use
 willemite?
 
 


  42
  PHILO.
  I
 was
 thinking
 cesium.
 
  HARLAN.
  Yeah,
 but
 where
 are
 we
 gonna
 get
 it.
 
  PHILO.
  Don’t
 they
 use
 cesium
 pellets
 in
 the
 tubes
 that
 they
 put
 in
 radio
 kits?
 
 
  AGNES.
  Like
 you
 see
 in
 the
 Sears
 Roebuck
 catalogue,
 you
 mean?
 
 
  PHILO.
  Yes.
 Little
 cesium
 pellets?
 
  STAN.
  They
 do
 use
 them.
 I
 had
 one.
 
 
  AGNES.
  We
 did
 too.
 But
 they’re
 tiny.
 
  PHILO.
  We’re
 gonna
 have
 to
 go
 to
 every
 hobby
 store
 in
 the
 city
 and
 buy
 every
 radio
 kit
 they’ve
 got.
 
  SARNOFF.
  They
 spent
 all
 day
 buying
 radio
 kits,
 then
 spent
 all
 night
 smashing
 the
 tubes
 open
 with
 a
  hammer,
 emptying
 the
 pellets
 out
 and
 grinding
 them
 into
 a
 paste.
 The
 change
 to
 cesium
  was
 gonna
 help
 but
 the
 selenium
 hadn’t
 been
 his
 problem
 and
 he
 knew
 that.
 His
 problem
  was
 that
 no
 one
 had
 been
 able
 to
 build
 the
 glass
 tube
 he
 wanted.
 He’d
 been
 through
 five
  different
 glassblowers.
 Two
 of
 them
 produced
 tube
 after
 tube
 that
 broke
 apart
 the
 moment
  they
 cooled,
 two
 others
 turned
 down
 the
 job
 outright
 and
 the
 fifth
 was
 doing
 the
 best
 he
  could.
 If
 was
 after
 midnight
 and
 Crocker
 was
 coming
 to
 the
 lab
 the
 next
 morning.
 His
 six
  months
 were
 up.
 He
 sat
 on
 the
 roof
 with
 a
 glass
 and
 a
 bottle
 of
 Bushmills.
 
 
  I.
 12A
 Roof.
 
  PHILO
 (to
 himself).
  Cesium
 will
 send
 a
 spray…maybe
 manipulated
 through…rubidium…
 
  PEM.
  Phil,
 you
 out
 there?
 
  PHILO.
  Yeah.
 
  PEM
 comes
 out
 on
 the
 roof.
 
 
 


  43
  PEM.
  You
 want
 anything?
 
  PHILO.
  No
 thanks.
 
  PEM.
  You
 want
 your
 violin?
 
  PHILO.
  No,
 I’m
 fine.
 
  PEM.
 (pause)
 You
 wanna
 hear
 something
 funny?
 Bill
 Crocker
 says
 there’s
 a
 correlation
  between
 music
 and
 science.
 
  PHILO.
  Music
 is
 what
 mathematics
 does
 on
 a
 Saturday
 night.
 
  PEM.
  Stan
 and
 Harlan
 are
 in
 there
 trying
 to
 rebuild
 it
 all
 again.
 
  PHILO.
  We
 don’t
 have
 it.
 
  PEM.
  We
 will.
 
  PHILO.
  Not
 by
 tomorrow
 morning.
 
  PEM.
  Then
 you’ll
 get
 more
 money
 from
 someone
 else.
 This
 isn’t
 the
 end.
 
  PHILO.
  I’m
 sure
 you’re
 right.
 
  PEM.
  But
 if
 it
 doesn’t
 work
 I’m
 not
 gonna
 make
 love
 to
 you
 until
 it
 does.
 
  PHILO
 smiles.
 
  PEM.
  No,
 I’m
 serious.
 
  HARLAN
 (from
 inside).
  Philo!
 
  PHILO.
  Then
 I’m
 screwed.
 


  44
 
  PEM.
  Not
 until
 you
 get
 a
 picture
 you’re
 not
 so
 let’s
 go.
 
 
  I.
 12B
 
 Lab.
 
  STAN,
 HARLAN,
 AGNES,
 and
 CLIFF
 stand
 around
 the
 table
 looking
 at
 something
 with
 great
  interest
 as
 PHILO
 and
 PEM
 enter.
 
  PHILO.
  What
 are
 you
 guys
 doing?
 
  AGNES.
  I
 think
 you’d
 better
 take
 a
 look
 at
 this.
 
  PHILO.
  What
 is
 it?
 
  AGNES.
  Cliff
 made
 it.
 
  STAN
 holds
 out
 a
 glass
 tube.
 
  PHILO
 (to
 CLIFF).
  You
 made
 this?
 
  CLIFF.
  The
 glassblower
 let
 me
 watch
 for
 a
 few
 weeks,
 and
 then
 he
 showed
 me
 some
 things—and
  you’ve
 talked
 about
 what
 it
 needed
 and
 what
 it
 was—
 
  PHILO.
  When
 did
 you
 do
 this?
 
 
  CLIFF.
  The
 first
 two
 were
 no
 good
 but
 I
 did
 this
 one
 yesterday.
 And
 then
 I
 let
 it
 cool.
 I
 did
 it
 during
  lunches
 and
 at—
 
  PEM
 (is
 this
 for
 real?).
  Philo?
 
  PHILO.
  Cliff
 made
 a
 cathode
 tube.
 (beat)
 This
 is
 the
 one
 we’re
 using,
 we
 gotta
 tear
 this
 thing
 apart
  again
 and
 rebuild
 it
 again.
 
  AGNES.
 
  There
 won’t
 be
 time
 to
 test
 it
 before
 they
 get
 here
 in
 the
 morning.
 
 
 


  45
  PHILO.
  Have
 any
 of
 the
 tests
 worked?
 
  AGNES.
  No.
 
  PHILO.
  Then
 what
 does
 it
 matter.
 Let’s
 go.
 
  They
 begin
 working.
 
 
  I.
 13
 
  SARNOFF.
  Harlan
 bumped
 into
 the
 camera
 that
 day,
 right?
 
  PHILO.
  Yeah.
 
  SARNOFF.
  It
 ended
 up
 aimed
 at
 the
 drafting
 table?
 
  PHILO.
  Yeah.
 
  SARNOFF.
  And
 Pem
 had
 been
 making
 notes
 in
 the
 lab
 notebooks
 so
 the
 desk
 lamp
 was
 on.
 
  PHILO.
  Yeah.
 
  SARNOFF.
  That’s
 pretty
 good
 luck.
 
  PHILO.
  You
 think
 I
 got
 lucky?
 
  SARNOFF.
  (beat)
 No.
 
  PHILO.
  I
 didn’t
 think
 so.
 
  SARNOFF
 (to
 audience).
  The
 room
 was
 divided
 in
 half
 by
 a
 black
 curtain.
 On
 one
 side
 was
 the
 camera
 aimed
 at
 a
  triangle
 on
 a
 rod
 which
 would
 swing
 back
 and
 forth
 like
 a
 pendulum
 to
 demonstrate
  motion.
 On
 the
 other
 side
 was
 a
 receiver.
 
 


  46
  GORRELL.
  Are
 we
 ready?
 
  PHILO.
  In
 a
 second.
 
  CROCKER,
 ATKINS,
 WILKINS,
 as
 well
 as
 EVERSON
 and
 GORRELL,
 CLIFF
 and
 STAN
 are
  gathering
 near
 the
 television
 set.
 A
 PHOTOGRAPHER
 joins
 them.
 
  AGNES
 (to
 PHILO).
  Good
 luck.
 
  PEM
 (entering)
  The
 triangle
 is
 moving.
 
  HARLAN
 enters.
 
  PHILO
 (to
 HARLAN).
  The
 triangle’s
 moving?
 
  HARLAN.
  Yes,
 but
 listen—
 
  PHILO
 (to
 the
 group).
  All
 right,
 gentlemen,
 the
 triangle
 I
 showed
 you
 before
 is
 moving
 now,
 you
 can
 go
 to
 the
  other
 side
 of
 the
 curtain
 if
 you
 want
 and
 take
 a
 look.
 (to
 HARLAN)
 Yeah?
 
  HARLAN
 (quietly).
  Listen.
 
  PHILO.
  What?
 
  GORRELL.
  What?
 
  HARLAN.
  Nothing.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Harlan
 had
 bumped
 into
 the
 image
 dissector
 while
 he
 was
 back
 there
 setting
 the
 triangle.
  He
 tried
 to
 check
 for
 damage
 but
 there
 wasn’t
 time,
 that’s
 what
 he
 was
 trying
 to
 tell
  Farnsworth.
 
  PHILO.
  Stan?
 
  SARNOFF.
  He
 started
 the
 current.
 


  47
 
  PHILO.
  It’s
 gonna
 warm
 up
 a
 second.
 
  SARNOFF.
  And
 the
 viewing
 screen
 was
 filled
 with
 electronic
 fog.
 
  HARLAN
 and
 STAN
 look
 at
 each
 other
 and
 drop
 their
 heads
 in
 disappointment.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Nothing.
 Nothing
 but
 electronic
 fog
 and
 cloudy,
 wavy
 line
 running
 up
 the
 middle.
 
  ATKINS
 &
 WILKINS
 (after
 a
 moment).
  Damn.
 
  CROCKER.
  It
 was
 a
 good
 effort,
 son.
 You’ve
 got
 nothing
 to
 be
 ashamed
 of.
 
  EVERSON.
  He’s
 right,
 Philo,
 you
 gave
 it
 a
 good
 shot.
 
  SARNOFF.
  He
 wasn’t
 hearing
 them,
 though.
 He
 was
 just
 staring
 at
 the
 electronic
 fog
 with
 the
 cloudy,
  wavy
 line
 running
 up
 the
 middle.
 
  HARLAN.
  Philo.
 
  PHILO.
  Hang
 on.
 
  PHILO
 peers
 closely
 at
 the
 screen.
 
  HARLAN.
  I
 bumped
 the
 camera
 before.
 
  PHILO.
  Hang
 on.
 
  HARLAN.
  When
 I
 was
 back
 there
 setting
 the
 triangle.
 I
 turned
 and
 my
 back
 hit
 the—
 
  PHILO.
  Hang
 on.
 
  HARLAN.
  I’m
 sure
 I
 hit
 the
 image
 dissector,
 something
 coulda
 come
 loose.
 If
 everybody
 can
 stay
 for
 a
  little
 while,
 we
 can—
 
 


  PHILO.
  Pem!
 
  PEM.
  He’s
 right,
 if
 he
 knocked
 something
 loose—
 
  PHILO.
  Did
 you
 leave
 a
 cigarette
 burning
 in
 the
 ashtray
 on
 the
 drafting
 table?
 
  PEM.
  What?
 
  PHILO.
  Did
 you
 leave
 a
 cigarette
 burning
 in
 the
 ashtray?
 
  PEM.
  Well
 what
 does
 it
 matter
 if
 I—
 
  PHILO
 runs
 to
 look
 in
 the
 other
 room
 and
 re-­‐enters
 immediately.
 
  PHILO.
  You
 didn’t
 break
 it
 Harlan,
 you
 moved
 it.
 (points
 to
 the
 screen)
 That’s
 the
 smoke.
 
  A
 chorus
 of
 “What?”
 “What?”
 “Huh?”
 “The
 wavy
 line?”
 “What’s
 he-­‐-­‐?”
 
  PHILO.
  That’s
 the
 smoke.
 
  CROCKER.
  Hang
 on.
 
  CROCKER
 goes
 to
 the
 other
 room,
 comes
 back
 and
 looks
 at
 the
 screen.
 
  CROCKER.
  (beat)
 It’s
 the
 smoke.
 It
 is.
 
  AGNES.
  Oh
 my
 God.
 
  ATKINS.
  I’ll
 be
 goddamned.
 
  WILKINS.
  Shit.
 
  EVERSON.
  It
 is,
 that’s
 the
 cigarette—Leslie,
 look
 at
 this,
 that’s
 the
 cigarette
 smoke.
 
 
 

48
 


  GORRELL.
  Oh
 my
 God.
 
  PHILO.
  Cliff!
 We
 got
 a
 picture!
 
  Whoops
 and
 hollers
 and
 applause.
 Going
 off
 to
 look
 and
 coming
 back
 on.
 
  CLIFF.
  We
 got
 a
 picture.
 
  PEM
 (hugging
 him).
  PHILO!
 
  PHILO.
  Showing
 off
 for
 women
 is
 a
 powerful
 incentive.
 
  AGNES.
  There
 it
 is!
 
  STAN.
  Look
 at
 that.
 
  CLIFF.
  That’s
 a
 goddamn
 television
 picture!
 
  PHOTOGRAPHER.
  Mr.
 Farnsworth?
 
  PHILO.
  Yes?
 
  PHOTOGRAPHER.
  Face
 front
 please
 for
 the
 San
 Francisco
 Chronicle.
 
  The
 photograph
 is
 snapped
 with
 a
 flash.
 
 

49
 


 


  50
  I.
 14
 RCA
 Conference
 Room
 
  SARNOFF,
 along
 with
 WACHTEL,
 SIMMS
 and
 a
 few
 other
 EXECUTIVES
 and
 BETTY,
 are
  listening
 to
 a
 radio
 commercial.
 
  RADIO
 VOICE.
  Razor
 Blade
 Michigan
 Pattern
 Ax:
 One
 dollar,
 eighty-­‐five
 cents.
 
  PHILO
 (to
 audience).
  The
 Jack
 Dempsey/Georges
 Carpentier
 title
 bout
 was
 billed
 as
 a
 battle
 between
 good
 and
  evil
 with
 Carpentier
 being
 good
 and
 Dempsey
 being
 evil.
 I
 can’t
 remember
 why.
 
  RADIO
 VOICE.
  Fulton
 Razor
 Blade
 Double
 Bit
 Michigan
 Pattern
 Ax:
 two
 dollars,
 forty
 cents.
 
  PHILO.
  It
 didn’t
 matter—Dempsey
 would
 win
 in
 a
 late
 round
 knockout—what
 mattered
 was
 that
  this
 was
 the
 first
 sporting
 event
 ever
 broadcast
 and
 readio
 was
 about
 to
 get
 launched
 like
 a
  Hercules
 rocket.
 You’d
 think
 this
 would
 make
 Sarnoff
 happy
 since
 he
 was
 the
 mastermind
  behind
 every
 square
 inch
 of
 it.
 
  RADIO
 VOICE.
  Fulton
 Hunter’s
 Hatchet:
 ninety-­‐five
 cents.
 
  PHILO.
  He’s
 not
 happy,
 though,
 ‘cause
 right
 now
 he’s
 listening
 to
 Walter
 Gifford’s
 radio
 which
 at
  the
 moment
 is
 broadcasting—
 
 
  RADIO
 VOICE.
  Handy
 Hand
 Saw,
 24
 inches:
 Two
 dollars,
 thirty-­‐five
 cents.
 Universal
 Fuse
 Plugs,
 made
 to
 fit
  all
 universal
 hollow
 ware:
 One
 dollar,
 ten
 cents.
 All
 this
 at
 Robinson’s
 Family
 Hardware,
  located
 at
 77th
 Street
 and
 Broadway,
 open
 six
 days
 from
 9
 AM
 to
 6
 PM.
 Fulton
 Perforated
  Lance
 Tooth
 Saw—
 
  SARNOFF.
  How
 long
 does
 this
 go
 on?
 
  WACHTEL.
  Ten
 minutes.
 
  RADIO
 VOICE.
  Lufkin
 Flat-­‐End
 Three
 Quarter-­‐Inch
 and
 Half-­‐Inch—
 
  WACHTEL.
  He’s
 selling
 ten-­‐minute
 blocks
 of
 time
 for
 50
 dollars.
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 asked
 him
 not
 to
 do
 that.
 


  51
 
  SIMMS.
  You
 asked
 him
 not
 to
 have
 his
 people
 take
 money
 under
 the
 table.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Did
 he
 think
 that
 meant
 I
 wanted
 him
 to
 take
 it
 over
 the
 table?
 
  WACHTEL.
  Well
 it’s
 his
 station,
 David,
 he
 can—
 
  SARNOFF.
  Hang
 on.
 
  RADIO
 VOICE.
  Reversible
 type
 handle
 ratchet
 wrench.
 Seventy-­‐five
 cents.
 
  SARNOFF.
  You
 know
 if
 you
 listen
 carefully,
 you
 can
 hear
 the
 sound
 of
 people
 throwing
 their
 radio
 sets
  out
 the
 window,
 buying
 a
 phonograph,
 and
 shooting
 me
 in
 the
 fucking
 head.
 
  RADIO
 VOICE.
  General
 Purpose
 Wheelbarrow—
 
  SARNOFF.
  You
 can’t
 do
 this,
 fellas.
 It’s
 not
 what
 radio
 is
 for.
 
  PHILO.
  Damn.
 If
 only
 there
 was
 a
 powerful
 person
 in
 broadcasting
 with
 the
 courage
 of
 his
  convictions
 who
 could
 do
 something
 about
 this.
 
  SARNOFF
 (to
 PHILO).
  Well
 I
 assume
 that
 was
 meant
 for
 me
 so
 I’ll
 just
 say
 that
 I’ve
 spent
 more
 time
 and
 effort
  than
 anyone
 ever
 trying
 to
 make
 television
 and
 radio
 informative,
 entertaining
 and
  sophisticated.
 
  PHILO.
  Job
 well
 done.
 
  SARNOFF.
  The
 picture
 you
 got
 was
 of
 no
 practical
 value,
 you
 needed
 too
 much
 light.
 
  PHILO.
  Yeah,
 the
 first
 time
 Orville
 and
 Wilbur
 Wright
 flew
 at
 Kitty
 Hawk
 the
 plane
 went
 about
 17
  feet
 but
 I
 think
 we’re
 pretty
 happy
 it
 did.
 
  SARNOFF.
  There
 was
 no
 way
 it
 was
 gonna
 get
 approved
 by
 the
 Commerce
 Department
 for
 commercial
  use
 in
 the
 state
 it
 was—
 
 


  52
  PHILO.
  Zworykin
 didn’t
 have
 a
 picture
 at
 all.
 
  SARNOFF.
  He
 solved
 your
 light
 problem.
 He
 solved
 your
 light
 problem
 and
 he’d
 filed
 a
 patent
 four
  years
 earlier.
 (back
 to
 EXECUTIVES)
 –and
 can
 somebody
 tell
 me
 what
 the
 fuck
 you’ve
 got
 in
  a
 hardware
 store
 you
 need
 ten
 minutes
 to
 sell
 me?!
 Is
 there
 clairvoyance
 in
 this
 store?!
 
  RADIO
 VOICE.
  All
 this
 at
 Robinson’s
 Family
 Hardware
 Store,
 located
 at
 77th
 and
 Broadway—
 
  HARBORD
 enters.
 
  HARBORD.
  Good
 morning.
 
  ALL.
  Good
 morning.
 
  HARBORD.
  Tex
 Rickert’s
 promoting
 the
 fight
 as
 good
 versus
 evil.
 
  SIMMS.
  And
 which
 one’s
 which?
 
  HARBORD.
  Jack
 Dempsey
 is
 evil.
 Wife
 beater,
 draft
 dodger—
 
  WACHTEL.
  Plus
 he’s
 got
 that
 face.
 
  SIMMS.
  And
 Carpentier’s
 our
 hero?
 
  HARBORD.
  French
 fighter
 pilot.
 He
 speaks
 French.
 
  SARNOFF.
  He
 is
 French.
 
  HARBORD.
  The
 French
 fighter
 pilot
 versus
 the
 Manhattan
 Mauler.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Manassa.
 He’s
 the
 Manassa
 Mauler.
 Manassa,
 Colorado.
 Jim,
 we’ve
 got
 a
 problem.
 
  HARBORD.
  Hang
 on.
 Is
 the
 signal
 gonna
 travel
 500
 miles,
 is
 this
 confirmed?
 
 


  53
  WACHTEL.
  A
 50,000
 watt
 transmitter
 that
 was
 going
 by
 train
 to
 the
 Navy
 Department
 in
 DC
 was
  diverted
 to
 a
 Lackawanna
 Railroad
 shed
 a
 tenth
 of
 a
 mile
 from
 the
 arena.
 
  HARBORD.
  Who
 got
 that
 done?
 
  ALL.
  Sarnoff.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Jim—
 
  WACHTEL.
  J.P.’s
 daughter,
 Anne
 Morgan,
 she
 was
 recruited
 to
 set
 up
 charity
 events
 all
 up
 and
 down
 the
  coast.
 
  SIMMS.
  They
 write
 a
 check
 to
 a
 good
 cause,
 they
 come
 to
 a
 house
 and
 have
 champagne
 and
 oysters
  and
 listen
 to
 the
 fight
 on
 the
 radio.
 
  WACHTEL.
  All
 in,
 we’re
 expecting
 200,000
 people
 to
 be
 listening.
 
  HARBORD.
  This
 broadcast
 is
 gonna
 make
 us
 bigger
 than
 Westinghouse.
 David,
 what
 do
 you
 have
 to
 say
  for
 yourself?
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 just
 listened
 to
 ten
 minutes
 of
 information
 about
 a
 hardware
 store
 on
 WEAF.
 
  HARBORD.
  That’s
 small
 potatoes.
 
  SARNOFF.
  No,
 it’s
 a
 very
 big
 potato.
 
  HARBORD.
  It’s
 Gifford’s
 station,
 leave
 him
 alone.
 
  SARNOFF.
  It’s
 our
 equipment,
 which
 no
 one
 will
 buy
 if
 the
 airwaves
 are
 filled
 with
 the
 price
 of
 three-­‐ quarter
 inch
 drill
 bits.
 We’re
 gonna
 be
 responsible
 for
 entertaining
 and
 informing
 a
 nation
  and
 we
 don’t
 have
 an
 engineer
 in
 Schenectady
 or
 an
 executive
 in
 New
 York
 who
 knows
  anything
 about
 that.
 
  SIMMS.
  David—
 
 


  54
  SARNOFF.
  We
 need
 to
 create
 a
 new
 company,
 Jim,
 a
 subdivision.
 The
 American
 Radio
 Group
 or
 the
  Public
 Radio
 Network—something—and
 bring
 in
 people
 who
 are
 experts
 at
 reporting
  information
 and
 events,
 experts
 in
 education,
 culture,
 public
 affairs
 and
 leaders
 in
  forming…
 
  SIMMS.
  What?
 
  SARNOFF.
  (beat)
 Taste!
 
  WACHTEL.
  Who
 gets
 the
 final
 call
 on
 what
 public
 taste
 should
 be,
 to
 say
 nothing
 of
 education
 and
  information?
 
  SARNOFF.
  We
 do
 this
 thing
 right
 and
 it’s
 us.
 
  HARBORD.
  Let’s
 get
 though
 the
 Manassa
 Mauler
 and
 then
 we
 can
 talk
 about
 being
 tastemakers.
 Thank
  you.
 David,
 will
 you
 stay
 a
 moment?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Yes
 sir.
 
  As
 the
 room
 begins
 clearing,
 SARNOFF
 scribbles
 something
 on
 his
 legal
 pad
 and
 slides
 it
 down
  the
 table.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Betty,
 do
 me
 a
 favor.
 Just
 for
 the
 hell
 of
 it,
 ask
 legal
 to
 run
 a
 clearance
 on
 this
 trademark
 and
  see
 if
 anyone’s
 using
 it.
 
  BETTY.
  Sure.
 
  PHILO.
  He’d
 scribbled
 some
 names
 on
 the
 pad—“American
 Radio
 Group,”
 “American
 Radio
  Network,”
 “Public
 Radio
 Corporation”—but
 he’d
 crossed
 those
 out.
 On
 the
 bottom
 of
 the
  page
 he’d
 circled
 his
 winner.
 The
 National
 Broadcasting
 Company.
 
  The
 room
 is
 now
 empty
 except
 for
 SARNOFF
 and
 HARBORD.
 
  HARBORD.
  All
 right,
 what’s
 your
 beef
 with
 Walter
 Gifford
 other
 than
 the
 obvious?
 
  SARNOFF.
  It’s
 got
 nothing
 to
 do
 with
 that.
 
 It’s
 business.
 
 


  55
  HARBORD.
  Good.
 
  SARNOFF.
  But
 AT&T’s
 gotta
 get
 outta
 radio.
 
  HARBORD.
  Gifford’s
 not
 gonna
 take
 a
 back
 seat
 to
 RCA.
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 don’t
 want
 them
 to
 take
 a
 back
 seat,
 I
 want
 ‘em
 out
 of
 the
 car.
 
  HARBORD.
  David—
 
  SARNOFF.
  Let
 me
 buy
 the
 audion
 tube.
 
  HARBORD.
  It’s
 gonna
 cost
 too
 much
 money.
 
  SARNOFF.
  It’s
 gonna
 make
 more.
 It’s
 gonna
 replace
 the
 crystal
 and
 it’s
 what’s
 gonna
 make
 music
  sound
 good.
 We’ll
 control
 it,
 we
 have
 to
 control
 the
 patents
 and
 we
 shouldn’t
 be
 paying
  royalties,
 we
 should
 be
 collecting
 them.
 The
 next
 time
 you
 talk
 to
 Gifford,
 and
 I
 think
 it
  should
 be
 soon,
 you
 gotta
 make
 it
 clear—
 
  HARBORD.
  I
 won’t
 be
 talking
 to
 Gifford.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Why
 not?
 
  HARBORD.
  All
 the
 rumors
 you’ve
 heard
 are
 true.
 They’ve
 been
 talking
 to
 me
 for
 a
 few
 weeks
 and
 they
  made
 it
 official
 last
 night.
 
  SARNOFF.
  You’re
 gonna
 go
 work
 for
 Herbert
 Hoover?
 
  HARBORD
 nods.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Congratulations,
 Jim.
 You’re
 gonna
 want
 to
 try
 not
 to
 screw
 that
 up.
 
  HARBORD.
  Yeah.
 
 
 


  56
  SARNOFF.
  Who’s
 taking
 your
 place?
 
 
 
  HARBORD.
  You.
 You’re
 being
 named
 at
 a
 press
 conference
 on
 Monday.
 
  SARNOFF.
  (pause)
 What?
 
  HARBORD.
  You’re
 gonna
 want
 to
 try
 not
 to
 screw
 that
 up.
 
  HARBORD
 exits,
 passing
 LIZETTE
 on
 her
 way
 into
 the
 conference
 room.
 
  HARBORD.
  Afternoon,
 Lizette.
 
  LIZETTE.
  Good
 afternoon,
 Mr.
 Harbord.
 (beat)
 David?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Liz.
 
  LIZETTE.
  Are
 we
 still
 having
 lunch?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Hm?
 
  LIZETTE.
  David,
 is
 everything
 all
 right?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Yeah.
 I’m
 the
 president
 of
 RCA.
 
  PHILO.
  It
 was
 a
 significant
 accomplishment.
 And
 after
 three
 weeks
 in
 his
 new
 job,
 it
 was
 time
 to
  take
 a
 meeting.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Betty?
 
  BETTY
 (entering).
  Yes,
 sir.
 
  SARNOFF.
  I’d
 like
 you
 to
 set
 up
 lunch
 with
 Walter
 Gifford.
 
 
 


  57
  BETTY.
  Yes
 sir,
 at
 his
 earliest
 convenience?
 
  SARNOFF.
  No,
 I
 don’t
 care
 it
 it’s
 convenient.
 
 
  I.
 15
 Restaurant.
 
  SARNOFF
 goes
 to
 GIFFORD’S
 table
 and
 sits.
 
  GIFFORD.
  David.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Walter.
 
  GIFFORD.
  I
 was
 gonna
 give
 you
 another
 two
 minutes
 and
 then
 order
 lunch.
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 apologize.
 
  GIFFORD.
  If
 you’re
 gonna
 be
 a
 captain
 of
 industry
 you’re
 gonna
 have
 to
 learn
 that
 captains
 of
 industry
  don’t
 like
 to
 wait
 for
 their
 fucking
 wives
 much
 less
 the
 guy
 who’s
 been
 president
 of
 RCA
 for
  three
 weeks.
 
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 was
 tuned
 to
 your
 radio
 station
 last
 night.
 
  GIFFORD.
  I’m
 glad
 to
 hear
 it.
 
  SARNOFF.
  There
 was
 a
 man
 named
 H.M.
 Blackwell
 and
 he
 was
 identified
 as
 a
 representative
 of
 the
  Queensboro
 Corporation.
 
  GIFFORD.
  I
 gotta
 tell
 you,
 David,
 ordinarily
 I’m
 not
 someone
 who
 gets
 summoned
 to
 lunch
 meetings.
 
  SARNOFF.
  This
 guy,
 Blackwell,
 he
 chatted
 about
 the
 carefree
 life
 in
 the
 suburbs,
 free
 from
 the
 hustle
 of
  the
 city.
 
  GIFFORD.
  Yeah.
 
 


  58
  SARNOFF.
  And
 ended
 by
 urging
 us
 to—“hurry
 to
 the
 apartment
 house
 near
 the
 green
 fields
 for
 the
  community
 life
 and
 friendly
 atmosphere
 that
 Nathaniel
 Hawthorne
 advocated.”
 
  GIFFORD.
  What
 can
 I
 do
 for
 you?
 
  SARNOFF.
  You
 know
 the
 name
 of
 the
 apartment
 house
 near
 the
 green
 fields?
 
  GIFFORD.
  David—
 
  SARNOFF.
  Hawthorne
 Estates,
 an
 apartment
 complex
 owned
 by-­‐-­‐?
 
  GIFFORD.
  Oh
 stop
 your—
 
  SARNOFF.
  The
 Queensboro
 Corporation.
 
  GIFFORD.
  It
 wasn’t
 a
 direct
 pitch.
 
  SARNOFF.
  We’ll
 set
 aside
 he
 was
 blowing
 Nathaniel
 Hawthorne
 all
 to
 hell,
 you
 don’t
 think
 people
  know
 when
 they’re
 being
 sold
 an
 apartment
 in
 Jackson
 Heights?
 You’ve
 got
 a
 13-­‐year-­‐old
  girl
 from
 Wilkes-­‐Barre
 singing
 Jerome
 Kern—
 
  GIFFORD.
  I
 like
 Jerome
 Kern.
 
  SARNOFF.
  So
 do
 I
 and
 I
 think
 other
 people
 will
 too
 if
 his
 songs
 are
 sung
 by
 professional
 singers.
 
  GIFFORD.
  What
 the
 hell
 is
 this
 lunch
 about?
 
  SARNOFF.
  It’s
 a
 courtesy.
 
  GIFFORD.
  You’re
 being
 courteous
 right
 now?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Yes.
 
 
 


  59
  GIFFORD.
  How?
 
  SARNOFF.
  By
 telling
 you
 in
 person
 that
 your
 company
 isn’t
 in
 the
 radio
 business
 anymore.
 
  GIFFORD.
  How
 are
 you
 gonna
 swing
 that?
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 already
 did.
 Your
 boss
 is
 getting
 10%
 of
 RCA
 preferred
 stock.
 
  GIFFORD.
  What’s
 RCA
 getting?
 
  SARNOFF.
  The
 audion
 tube.
 
  GIFFORD.
  (pause)
 You
 bought
 the
 audion
 tube?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Yes.
 
  GIFFORD.
  You
 gave
 away
 10%
 of
 your
 company
 for
 the
 audion
 tube?
 
  SARNOFF.
  I’ll
 tell
 you,
 it
 would’ve
 been
 a
 steal
 at
 twice
 the
 price.
 
  GIFFORD.
  And
 what
 are
 you
 saying—you’re
 saying
 your
 not
 gonna
 license
 it
 out,
 that’s
 what
 you’re
  saying
 now?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Of
 course
 we’re
 gonna
 license
 it
 out.
 
  GIFFORD.
  Good.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Just
 not
 to
 you.
 
  GIFFORD.
  I’ll
 take
 this
 to
 an
 arbitrator.
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 know
 you
 will.
 
 


  60
  GIFFORD.
  You’re
 a
 cocksucker.
 
  SARNOFF.
  I’ve
 been
 told
 that
 before.
 
  GIFFORD.
  You
 think
 if
 radio’s
 bad
 once
 in
 a
 while
 that
 people
 won’t
 start
 listening,
 that’s
 your
  nightmare?
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 don’t
 know
 which
 is
 my
 nightmare.
 That
 radio’s
 bad
 and
 people
 don’t
 start
 listening
 or
  that
 radio’s
 bad
 and
 they
 do.
 Either
 way,
 I’ll
 take
 my
 chances
 with
 the
 arbitrator.
 
  GIFFORD.
  Alright.
 (beat)
 David?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Yes.
 
  GIFFORD.
  I
 don’t
 like
 the
 publicity,
 David.
 Is
 there
 any
 way
 to
 avoid
 that?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Sure.
 
  GIFFORD.
  I’m
 serious.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Me
 too.
 We
 can
 fix
 it
 up
 right
 now
 and
 everybody’s
 happy
 and
 I
 license
 you
 the
 audion
 tube
  and
 you
 keep
 your
 stations.
 We
 can
 do
 it
 right
 now,
 it’s
 simple.
 
  GIFFORD.
  How?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Give
 me
 the
 name
 of
 one
 Jew
 who
 works
 at
 AT&T.
 
  GIFFORD
 stares
 at
 him.
 
  SARNOFF.
 (beat)
 One
 Jew.
 Anywhere.
 Doesn’t
 have
 to
 be
 an
 executive.
 Bookkeeping,
 the
  switchboard—
 
  GIFFORD.
  This
 lunch
 is
 over.
 
 
 
 


  61
  I.
 16A
 Sarnoff’s
 Office.
 
  PHILO.
  In
 fact
 he
 was
 just
 getting
 warmed
 up.
 He
 bought
 the
 audion
 tube,
 he
 bought
 Frequency
  Modulation
 band
 from
 the
 great
 Edwin
 Armstrong
 and
 he
 launched
 the
 NBC
 Radio
  Network.
 He
 dictated
 memo
 after
 memo
 and
 gave
 speech
 after
 speech
 discussing
 the
 civic
  responsibilities
 of
 the
 custodians
 of
 mass
 communication.
 
  SARNOFF
 is
 dictating
 to
 BETTY.
 
  SARNOFF.
  When
 you
 can
 transmit
 the
 human
 voice
 into
 the
 home,
 when
 you
 can
 make
 the
 home
  attuned
 to
 what
 is
 going
 on
 in
 the
 rest
 of
 the
 world,
 you’ve
 tapped
 a
 new
 source
 of
  influence
 and
 the
 possibility
 that
 we
 can
 raise
 ourselves
 up
 culturally,
 spiritually,
  intellectually
 and
 economically.
 It
 is
 my
 regrettable
 obligation
 to
 tell
 you
 that
 RCA
 does
 not
  own
 the
 airwaves.
 
  SARNOFF
 is
 giving
 a
 speech.
 
  SARNOFF.
  We
 don’t
 own
 the
 airwaves
 anymore
 than
 we
 own
 the
 air
 and
 it’s
 only
 a
 matter
 of
 time
  before
 somebody
 taps
 Congress
 on
 the
 shoulder
 and
 reminds
 them
 of
 that,
 and
 friends,
  that’s
 going
 to
 be
 bad
 for
 business.
 Radio
 stations
 should
 be
 run
 like
 public
 libraries.
 
  PHILO.
  And
 anyone
 who
 knew
 anything
 was
 buying
 RCA
 stock.
 
  ACTOR
 1.
  RCA’s
 up
 a
 point
 and
 a
 half.
 
  ACTOR
 2.
  RCA
 stock
 sets
 new
 record!
 
  ACTOR
 3.
  64
 and
 three-­‐eighths.
 
  ACTOR
 4.
  It’s
 at
 71
 and
 3/8ths.
 
  ACTOR
 5.
  General
 Motors
 puts
 radios
 in
 cars!
 
  ACTOR
 6.
  I
 sold
 it
 at
 77.
 
  ACTOR
 3.
  It’s
 up
 to
 85.
 
 
 


  62
  ACTOR
 4.
  91.
 
  ACTOR
 3.
  93.
 
  ACTOR
 2.
  97
 dollars
 a
 share.
 
  ACTOR
 6.
  Up
 two
 points.
 
  ACTOR
 1.
  Up
 three
 and
 a
 half.
 
  ACTOR
 5.
  One
 hundred
 and
 twenty-­‐nine
 dollars.
 
  PHILO.
  If
 you’d
 invested
 $10,000
 in
 RCA
 the
 day
 before
 the
 Dempsey
 fight,
 three
 years
 later
 you’d
  be
 a
 millionaire.
 When
 his
 bosses
 at
 GE
 showed
 him
 the
 plans
 for
 new
 office
 space
 in
 the
  Art
 Deco
 building
 being
 constructed
 at
 30
 Rockefeller
 Center,
 Sarnoff
 took
 a
 red
 pen
 and
  circled
 a
 wing
 of
 offices
 on
 a
 particular
 floor
 that
 would
 be
 used
 for
 his
 team.
 (beat)
 He
  called
 it
 Radio
 City.
 
 
  I.
 16B
 
 Conference
 Room
 
  WACHTEL.
  We
 would
 acquire
 all
 the
 assets
 of
 Victor
 Talking
 Machines
 including
 your
 manufacturing
  plant
 in
 Camden
 which
 we
 would
 annex
 to
 our
 own.
 And,
 it
 would
 go
 without
 saying
 that
  we’re
 also
 acquiring—
 
  SARNOFF.
  (beat)
 The
 dog.
 
  WACHTEL.
  The
 dog.
 
  SARNOFF.
  What’s
 his
 name?
 
  WACHTEL.
  Nipper.
 
  SARNOFF.
  People
 have
 confidence
 in
 the
 dog.
 
 
 


  63
  I.
 17
 
 Sarnoff’s
 Office.
 
  PHILO.
  Once
 a
 week,
 a
 junior
 executive
 named
 Ridley
 would
 run
 to
 a
 newsstand
 on
 Lexington
  Avenue
 that
 sold
 out
 of
 town
 newspapers.
 On
 this
 day
 she
 drops
 a
 quarter
 in
 a
 dish
 and
  picks
 up
 The
 Chicago
 Daily
 News,
 The
 Washington
 Evening
 Star,
 The
 Philadelphia
 Ledger— and
 a
 week-­‐and-­‐a-­‐half-­‐old
 copy
 of
 The
 San
 Francisco
 Chronicle.
 
  RIDLEY
 enters
 with
 a
 newspaper.
 
  RIDLEY.
  Betty—
 
  BETTY.
  You’re
 out
 of
 breath.
 
  RIDLEY.
  I
 ran
 here.
 
  BETTY.
  What’s
 the
 matter?
 
  RIDLEY.
  I
 need
 to
 see
 him.
 
  BETTY.
  He’s
 just
 getting
 out
 of
 meeting
 with
 the
 guys
 from
 Victor
 Talking
 Machines.
 What
 in
 the
  world
 happened?
 
  RIDLEY.
  A
 guy
 in
 San
 Francisco—
 
  SARNOFF
 enters.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Betty.
 
  RIDLEY.
  David,
 the
 newspaper—
 
  SARNOFF.
  It’s
 done,
 we’ve
 got
 a
 phonograph
 company.
 
  RIDLEY.
  There’s
 an
 item
 on
 the
 front
 page
 of
 The
 San
 Francisco
 Chronicle.
 
  SARNOFF.
  No,
 listen
 to
 this.
 The
 symbol’s
 going
 to
 be
 a
 dog
 who
 thinks
 he
 hears
 his
 master’s
 voice
  coming
 from
 a
 gramophone.
 


  64
 
  RIDLEY.
  A
 guy
 named
 Philo
 Farnsworth—
 
  SARNOFF.
  Calm
 down.
 
  RIDLEY.
  A
 guy
 named
 Philo
 Farnsworth—
 
  SARNOFF.
  What’s
 the
 name?
 
  RIDLEY.
  Philo.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Spell
 it.
 
  RIDLEY.
  P-­‐H-­‐I-­‐L-­‐O.
 He’s
 been
 working
 on
 television.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Who
 isn’t?
 
  RIDLEY.
  No,
 he’s
 been
 working
 on
 electronic
 television.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Well
 lemme
 know
 when
 he
 gets
 a
 picture
 ‘cause
 Zworykin
 says
 it
 can’t
 be
 done
 and
 he’s
  been
 trying
 most
 of
 his
 life.
 Why’s
 The
 San
 Francisco
 Chronicle
 interested
 in
 this
 guy?
 
  RIDLEY.
  He
 got
 a
 picture.
 
  SARNOFF.
  (pause)
 What
 are
 you
 talking
 about?
 
  RIDLEY
 hands
 the
 paper
 to
 SARNOFF,
 who
 reads.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Betty,
 get
 the
 department
 heads
 here.
 Engineering,
 commercial,
 legal.
 Get
 the
 patent
 cops.
 
  BETTY.
  Yes,
 sir,
 when?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Now,
 Betty.
 The
 goddamn
 paper’s
 a
 week
 old.
 
 


  65
 
  I.
 18
 
 Conference
 Room.
 
  JAMES.
  Well,
 the
 way
 I
 read
 it,
 Farnsbrook’s
 asking
 for
 proprietary
 status
 on
 three
 separate
  patents.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Farnsworth.
 Philo
 Farnsworth.
 
  JAMES.
  The
 first
 is
 for
 something
 called
 an
 electric
 oscillator
 system.
 The
 second
 is
 for
 what
 he’s
  calling
 an
 image
 dissector
 and
 the
 third
 is
 for
 the
 television
 receiving
 system.
 
  LENNOX.
  You’re
 worried
 about
 nothing,
 David.
 
  SIMMS
 (reading).
  “In
 my
 laboratory
 at
 the
 present
 time
 I
 have
 a
 system
 in
 operation
 which
 requires
 a
 wave
  band
 of
 only
 six
 kilocycles
 to
 carry
 the
 images
 from
 the
 transmitter
 to
 the
 receiver,”
 Mr.
  Farnsworth
 continued.
 
  LENNOX.
  Much
 ado
 about
 nothing.
 
  SIMMS
 (reading).
  “It
 is
 perfectly
 possible
 to
 reduce
 this
 wave
 band
 to
 five
 kilocycles
 so
 it
 can
 be
 sent
 out
 by
  regular
 broadcasting
 stations.
 I
 expect
 the
 receiving
 device
 will
 be
 able
 to
 be
 sold
 at
 retail
  for
 under
 $300.”
 
  SARNOFF.
  How
 is
 it
 possible,
 I
 mean
 how
 is
 it
 fucking
 possible
 that
 RCA
 is
 finding
 out
 about
 this
 from
  The
 San
 Francisco
 Chronicle?
 
  LENNOX.
  David—
 
  SARNOFF.
  How
 long
 before
 the
 Commerce
 Department
 approves
 it
 for
 commercial
 use?
 
  LENNOX.
  This
 is
 what
 I’m
 trying
 to
 tell
 you.
 It’s
 a
 very
 weak
 picture
 he
 got
 and
 to
 get
 a
 stronger
 one
  he’d
 need
 lights
 too
 hot
 to—
 
  SARNOFF.
  But
 that’s
 just
 engineering,
 right?
 
  LENNOX.
  Maybe.
 


  66
 
  SARNOFF.
  He
 could
 have
 a
 practical
 picture
 in
 a
 year?
 
  LENNOX.
  He’s
 got
 very
 serious
 light
 problems
 to
 solve.
 
  SARNOFF.
  And
 I’m
 asking
 isn’t
 that
 just
 engineering
 and
 how
 long
 will
 it
 take
 to—
 
  SIMMS.
  An
 under-­‐funded,
 under-­‐staffed,
 ill-­‐educated
 Mormon
 in
 a
 one-­‐room
 lab?
 
  SARNOFF.
  He
 got
 this
 far
 somehow,
 he
 didn’t
 build
 the
 thing
 out
 of
 bibles
 and
 moonshine.
 Is
 there
 any
  part
 of
 a
 television
 operating
 system
 he’s
 not
 going
 to
 own
 the
 exclusive
 rights
 to?
 
  SIMMS.
  He
 made
 the
 console
 out
 of
 pine.
 
  SARNOFF.
  So
 you’re
 saying
 he’s
 not
 going
 to
 own
 the
 patent
 on
 wood.
 
  WACHTEL.
  Why
 don’t
 we
 just
 make
 him
 an
 offer
 on
 it.
 
  SARNOFF.
  We
 can’t.
 
  WACHTEL.
  Why
 not?
 
  SARNOFF.
  We
 can’t.
 
  WACHTEL.
  David—
 
  SARNOFF.
  If
 we
 make
 him
 an
 offer-­‐-­‐
 
 
  SARNOFF/PHILO
 (at
 the
 same
 time).
  It
 means
 he
 invented
 television!
 
 
  End
 of
 Act
 One.
 
 
 


 


 

67
 

ACT
 TWO.
 
 

II.
 1
 Sarnoff’s
 Office
 
  SARNOFF.
  If
 we
 make
 him
 an
 offer
 it
 means
 he
 invented
 television!
 
  WACHTEL.
  Offer
 him
 a
 hundred-­‐thousand,
 offer
 it
 to
 him
 in
 stock,
 he’ll
 take
 it.
 
  SARNOFF.
  He
 might,
 but
 if
 he
 doesn’t
 that’s
 the
 ball
 game.
 And
 a
 year
 from
 now,
 when
 he
 solves
  whatever
 problem
 he’s
 having
 with
 light
 and
 the
 thing
 gets
 approved
 for
 sale,
 he’s
 gonna
  own
 General
 Electric
 and
 anything
 else
 he
 wants
 to
 buy.
 (beat)
 We
 can’t
 buy
 his
 system
  ‘cause
 that’d
 mean
 he
 invented
 it
 and
 he
 didn’t,
 we
 did,
 it’s
 just
 that
 ours
 doesn’t
 work
 yet.
  Simms,
 if
 Zworykin
 can
 get
 a
 good
 picture
 before
 Farnsworth,
 if
 he
 can
 get
 it
 first,
 can
 he
  revisit
 his
 1923
 patent
 application
 and
 seek
 priority
 of
 invention?
 
  SIMMS.
  Yes.
 
  SARNOFF.
  What’s
 our
 budget
 for
 television
 research?
 
  SIMMS.
  $50,000.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Give
 Zworykin
 two
 hundred
 thousand
 and
 double
 his
 staff.
 Call
 our
 people
 at
 Corning
 and
  tell
 ‘em
 he
 gets
 all
 the
 glass
 he
 needs.
 
  WACHTEL.
  David,
 can
 I
 say
 something
 please,
 before
 we
 start
 doing
 things
 that
 might
 make
 us
 look
  foolish
 in
 the
 eyes
 of,
 at
 the
 very
 least,
 our
 shareholders?
 It’s
 a
 gadget,
 it’s
 a
 parlor
 trick
 for
  a
 couple
 of
 rich
 people.
 It’s
 something
 to
 show
 at
 the
 World’s
 Fair.
 
  SARNOFF.
  You’re
 wrong.
 
  WACHTEL.
  The
 thing’s
 a
 monstrosity,
 David.
 It’s
 huge
 and
 unsightly.
 Think
 of
 a
 person’s
 home,
 where
  the
 hell
 are
 they
 gonna
 put
 it?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Where
 they
 used
 to
 put
 their
 radio.
 (beat)
 All
 right,
 meeting
 over.
 
  Everyone
 exits.
 BETTY
 enters.
 
 
 


  68
  BETTY.
  Can
 I
 get
 you
 anything?
 
  SARNOFF.
  When
 it
 rains
 it
 pours,
 Betty.
 
  BETTY.
  I’m
 sorry?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Gifford’s
 gonna
 sue
 us
 in
 Federal
 Court.
 I
 have
 a
 hunch
 the
 Court’s
 gonna
 end
 up
 calling
 our
  patent
 pool
 by
 a
 different
 name.
 
  BETTY.
  What
 are
 they
 gonna
 call
 it?
 
  SARNOFF.
  An
 illegal
 monopoly.
 And
 a
 report
 from
 the
 Treasury
 Department
 says
 that
 as
 of
 today,
  more
 people
 have
 invested
 in
 radio
 than
 own
 radios.
 
  BETTY.
  What
 does
 that
 mean?
 
  SARNOFF.
  It
 means
 our
 stock
 might
 be
 over-­‐valued
 and
 headed
 for
 what’s
 called
 an
 adjustment.
 A
  little
 like
 the
 adjustment
 the
 French
 gave
 to
 Louis
 the
 16th.
 (beat)
 I’m
 sorry,
 you
 came
 in
  here
 and
 you
 asked
 me
 something.
 
  BETTY.
  Can
 I
 get
 you
 anything?
 
  SARNOFF.
  No
 thank
 you.
 You
 can
 go
 home.
 
  BETTY.
  (beat)
 You
 know,
 for
 what
 it’s
 worth,
 my
 father
 used
 to
 say,
 when
 a
 string
 of
 things
 went
  bad,
 he
 used
 to
 say
 “Well,
 at
 least
 you
 know
 nothing’s
 gonna
 happen
 next.”
 
  BETTY
 exits.
 
  SARNOFF
 (to
 the
 audience)
  And
 I
 remember
 thinking
 that
 was
 funny.
 ‘Cause
 my
 father
 used
 to
 say
 something
 always
  happens
 next.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


  69
  II.2
 
 New
 York
 Stock
 Exchange/Phone
 Bank
 
  PHILO.
  This
 is
 a
 true
 story.
 Early
 on
 the
 morning
 of
 October
 29th,
 1929,
 a
 huge
 flock
 of
 blackbirds
  and
 starlings,
 in
 the
 middle
 of
 their
 migratory
 route
 south,
 landed
 in
 front
 of
 City
 Hall
 Plaza
  in
 New
 York
 City.
 They
 actually
 stopped
 traffic
 on
 Fourth
 Avenue
 for
 five
 minutes.
 When
  the
 flock
 took
 off
 again,
 about
 a
 hundred
 of
 the
 group
 lay
 dead
 on
 the
 street
 from
 starvation
  and
 exhaustion.
 Those
 birds
 would
 end
 up
 having
 a
 better
 day
 than
 the
 rest
 of
 the
 country.
 
  The
 stock
 exchange
 is
 about
 ready
 to
 begin
 its
 trading
 day.
 A
 MAN
 is
 on
 a
 wall
 phone.
 
  PHILO.
  Here’s
 how
 it
 works.
 This
 man
 is
 a
 firm
 clerk.
 It’s
 one
 minute
 before
 trading
 begins
 and
 he’s
  on
 the
 phone
 with
 a
 broker
 at
 his
 firm.
 A
 customer
 wants
 to
 sell
 all
 500
 shares
 of
 his
 stock
  in
 Montgomery
 Ward.
 The
 firm
 clerk
 takes
 the
 order
 and
 passes
 it
 to
 one
 of
 the
 firm’s
 floor
  traders.
 
 
  SARNOFF.
  This
 doesn’t
 have
 anything
 to
 do
 with
 anything.
 
  PHILO.
  Yes
 it
 does,
 sir.
 (to
 audience)
 It’s
 been
 a
 very
 bad
 week
 for
 the
 New
 York
 Stock
 Exchange
 as
  the
 Dow
 Jones
 has
 lost
 10
 percent
 of
 its
 value
 in
 just
 four
 days.
 There
 are
 strict
 rules
 on
 the
  trading
 floor:
 No
 running,
 pushing,
 cursing
 and
 suit
 coats
 must
 be
 worn
 at
 all
 times.
 20
  minutes
 from
 now
 those
 rules
 will
 go
 out
 the
 window,
 but
 right
 now
 it’s
 30
 seconds
 before
  the
 start
 of
 trading
 and
 our
 floor
 trader
 has
 made
 it
 over
 to
 the
 section
 of
 the
 16,000
 square
  foot
 floor
 where
 retail
 stocks
 are
 being
 traded
 and
 goes
 to
 the
 Montgomery
 Ward
 post.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Philo—
 
  PHILO.
  Excuse
 me,
 this
 is
 my
 turn
 now.
 
 (to
 audience)
 
 At
 the
 post
 is
 the
 specialist
 for
 Montgomery
  Ward.
 His
 job
 is
 to
 match
 sellers
 with
 buyers
 and
 establish
 the
 strike
 price,
 that’s
  somewhere
 between
 the
 ask
 and
 the
 offer.
 15
 seconds
 till
 the
 market
 opens.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Go
 ahead,
 re-­‐live
 the
 whole
 damn
 thing.
 
  PHILO.
  Now
 in
 that
 phone
 call,
 the
 clerk
 asked
 the
 broker
 if
 he
 had
 a
 limit
 price
 and
 the
 broker
  said,
 “Sell
 it
 at
 market”
 which
 means
 get
 whatever
 you
 can
 for
 it
 and
 that’s
 ‘cause
 after
 the
  last
 four
 days
 there
 are
 a
 lot
 more
 sellers
 than
 buyers.
 Now
 when
 there
 are
 more
 sellers
  than
 buyers
 and
 the
 men
 are
 no
 longer
 required
 to
 wear
 suit
 coats,
 I
 don’t
 need
 to
 tell
 you
  what
 happens
 next.
 Ready?
 
 
  The
 “ding
 ding
 ding”
 of
 the
 stock
 floor
 opening
 is
 heard.
 
 
 


  70
  TRADER
 (shouting).
  Selling
 500
 shares
 of
 Montgomery
 Ward!
 
  SALES
 REP
 (shouting).
  I’m
 taking
 82.
 
  TRADER
 (shouting).
  What
 the
 hell
 are
 you
 talking
 about,
 you
 closed
 at
 97!
 
  SALES
 REP
 (shouting).
  I’ve
 got
 25
 sell
 orders
 at
 82.
 
  TRADER
 (shouting).
  Ah,
 fuck,
 Tony,
 we
 opened
 10
 seconds
 ago!
 
  PHILO.
  These
 guys
 are
 pretty
 tired
 from
 spending
 the
 past
 four
 days
 losing
 other
 people’s
 money
  and
 now
 that
 floor
 trader’s
 got
 a
 decision
 to
 make.
 He
 can
 go
 back
 to
 the
 phones,
 call
 the
  broker
 and
 tell
 him
 the
 market
 price
 on
 Montgomery
 Ward’s
 a
 lot
 lower
 than
 they’re
  thinking,
 but
 that’ll
 cost
 him
 a
 few
 minutes
 and
 it
 could
 cost
 the
 customer
 a
 few
 thousand
  dollars.
 He
 was
 told
 to
 sell
 at
 the
 market.
 Nobody
 wants
 to
 be
 at
 the
 beginning
 of
 an
  avalanche,
 but
 better
 at
 the
 beginning
 of
 an
 avalanche
 than
 at
 the
 end
 of
 one.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Philo—
 
  TRADER
 (shouting).
  Selling
 500
 shares
 of
 Montgomery
 Ward
 at
 82
 dollars
 a
 share!
 
  OTHER
 TRADERS
 (top
 of
 their
 lungs).
  Selling
 2000
 shares
 at
 81!/Selling!/Get
 me
 79!
 79!/1500
 shares
 at
 78!
 I’ll
 take
 78!/
  Gimme
 77
 and
 a
 half!
 
  PHILO.
  The
 sales
 rep
 takes
 the
 order,
 puts
 it
 in
 a
 pneumatic
 tube
 system
 where
 it’s
 sent
 to
 a
  repository
 at
 the
 center
 of
 the
 trading
 floor
 and
 a
 teletype
 operator
 marks
 the
 price
 on
 a
  ticker
 wire.
 For
 anyone
 who
 understands
 what
 they’re
 looking
 at,
 it
 only
 takes
 a
 minute
 to
  realize
 that
 something’s
 going
 terribly
 wrong.
 
 
  II.
 3A
 
 Sarnoff’s
 Office.
 
  SIMMS.
  It’s
 the
 volume.
 It’s
 the
 volume
 of
 the
 trades.
 45,000
 shares
 of
 Anaconda
 Copper?
 50,000
  Standard
 Oil?
 I’m
 looking
 at—I
 can’t
 believe
 I’m
 adding
 this
 right—
 
  PHILO.
  You
 are.
 
 


  SIMMS.
  630,000
 shares
 traded
 in
 the
 first
 26
 transactions.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Where
 did
 we
 open?
 This
 morning,
 where
 did
 we
 open?
 
  WACHTEL.
  One-­‐oh-­‐one.
 
  SARNOFF.
  We
 closed
 at
 118.
 
  WACHTEL.
  Yeah.
 
  SARNOFF.
  We
 dropped
 17
 points
 a
 share
 while
 we
 were
 sleeping?
 
  SIMMS.
  They’re
 called
 air
 pockets.
 
  SARNOFF
 (shouting).
  Betty!
 
  SIMMS.
  You
 can
 fall
 15,
 20,
 25
 points
 at
 a
 time
 before
 you
 find
 a
 buyer.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Air
 pockets.
 
  BETTY
 steps
 in.
 
  BETTY.
  Yes
 sir.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Get
 me
 the
 Chairman
 of
 the
 Federal
 Reserve.
 
 
  II.
 3B
 Conference
 Room.
 
  PHILO.
  The
 Fed
 was
 already
 in
 an
 impromptu
 emergency
 session.
 
  CHAIRMAN.
  The
 discussion
 will
 be
 do
 we
 lower
 the
 discount
 rate
 from
 six
 to
 five.
 
 
 
 

71
 


  72
  ADVISOR.
  We
 have
 to,
 sir.
 People
 are
 gonna
 require
 liquidity
 to
 meet
 what
 are
 going
 to
 be
 devastating
  margin
 calls.
 
  CHAIRMAN.
  If
 we
 intervene
 and
 the
 market
 continues
 to
 dive
 then
 the
 Fed’s
 gonna
 seem
 impotent.
 
  ADVISOR.
  We
 don’t
 give
 a
 shit,
 Roy,
 this
 isn’t
 an
 academic
 exercise.
 Confidence
 is
 being
 destroyed
 and
  fortunes
 are
 being
 lost.
 
  CHAIRMAN.
  Holy
 Jesus
 God,
 is
 the
 market
 crashing?
 
  ADVISOR.
  Mr.
 Chairman,
 we
 ain’t
 seen
 nothin’
 yet.
 
 
  II.
 3C
 Trading
 Floor.
 
  PHILO.
  By
 noon,
 the
 floor
 was
 four
 inches
 thick
 with
 paper.
 Everywhere
 you
 turned,
 the
 names
  that
 built
 the
 20th
 Century
 were
 falling
 down
 around
 you.
 Union
 Carbide,
 Blue
 Ridge,
 Dow
  Chemical,
 ITT,
 US
 Steel.
 
 And
 if
 things
 couldn’t
 get
 worse—
 
  TRADER
 (shouting
 on
 the
 phone).
  The
 ticker
 is
 88
 minutes
 behind!
 
  PHILO.
  -­‐-­‐the
 typists
 couldn’t
 keep
 up
 with
 the
 orders.
 
  TRADER
 (louder
 on
 the
 phone).
  I
 said
 the
 ticker
 is
 88
 minutes
 behind!
 Clients
 are
 giving
 us
 sell
 orders
 based
 on
 what
 the
  market
 was
 an
 hour
 and
 a
 half
 ago!
 The
 bankers
 are
 gonna
 have
 to
 step
 up
 and
 roll
 back
 the
  margins.
 Guys
 are
 gettin’
 killed
 out
 here!
 
 
  II.
 3D
 Banker
 Meeting.
 
  PHILO.
  The
 heads
 of
 National
 City
 Bank,
 Chase
 National
 Bank,
 Bankers
 Trust,
 and
 Guaranty
 Trust
  gathered
 at
 New
 York’s
 biggest
 investment
 bank,
 the
 House
 of
 Morgan.
 
  BANKER
 1.
  If
 we
 go
 and
 buy—
 
  BANKER
 2.
  Thomas—
 
 


  73
  BANKER
 1.
  If
 we
 buy—
 
  BANKER
 2.
  Listen
 to
 me.
 
  BANKER
 1.
  If
 we
 go
 in
 now
 and
 buy
 like
 crazy
 it’ll
 prop
 up
 confidence,
 it’ll
 prop
 up
 prices.
 
  BANKER
 2.
  That
 is
 what
 Charley
 Mitchell
 said
 last
 Thursday
 when
 he
 went
 in
 for
 US
 Steel
 and
 got
 hit
 in
  the
 head
 with
 a
 hundred
 tons
 of
 sheet
 metal.
 
  BANKER
 3.
  What
 about
 the
 calls?
 (beat)
 What
 about
 the
 margin
 calls?
 
  BANKER
 1.
  Some
 people
 are
 going
 to
 get
 hurt.
 
  PHILO.
  When
 you
 buy
 on
 margins,
 you’re
 essentially
 taking
 out
 a
 loan.
 And
 if
 the
 stock
 price
  becomes
 “impaired”—falls
 below
 a
 certain
 point—the
 bank
 can
 call
 in
 the
 loan.
 So
 every
  broker
 in
 NY
 is
 trying
 to
 call
 every
 client
 in
 the
 country
 to
 tell
 them
 that
 not
 only
 is
 their
  investment
 gone
 but
 they
 actually
 owe
 money
 to
 a
 bank.
 
  BROKER
 (into
 phone).
  It’s
 a
 margin
 call.
 You
 owe
 your
 account
 $8,000.
 (beat)
 Do
 you
 understand?
 There’s
 nothing
  left
 and
 you
 owe
 the
 bank
 $8,000.
 
  CLIENT.
  I
 don’t
 understand—how
 do
 they
 expect
 me
 to—
 
  PHILO.
  They’re
 going
 to
 take
 your
 house.
 
  The
 “clang
 clang
 clang
 clang
 clang”
 of
 the
 closing
 of
 the
 trading
 floor
 sounds.
 
 
  II.
 4
 
  PHILO.
  See
 how
 I
 ended
 that,
 David?
 With
 the
 metaphor
 of
 the
 house?
 
  SARNOFF.
  It
 was
 exquisitely
 subtle,
 Phil.
 You
 done?
 
  PHILO.
  No,
 we
 gotta
 check
 the
 scoreboard.
 24
 hours
 earlier
 RCA
 was
 worth
 a
 hundred
 and
  eighteen
 dollars
 a
 share.
 What
 are
 you
 worth
 now?
 


  74
 
  SARNOFF
 sifts
 through
 the
 ticker
 tapes.
 
  PHILO.
  David?
 
  SARNOFF.
  42.
 
  PHILO
 (to
 audience).
  He’d
 predicted
 a
 price
 adjustment
 but
 nothing
 like
 that.
 He
 was
 also
 right
 about
 the
 Federal
  Courts
 busting
 the
 patent
 pool
 as
 an
 illegal
 monopoly.
 He
 was
 gonna
 have
 to
 make
 some
  concessions
 in
 the
 settlement,
 one
 of
 which
 was
 that
 there’d
 be
 no
 more
 horseshit
 rules
  about
 advertising
 over
 the
 airwaves.
 It’s
 every
 station
 owner
 for
 himself
 and
 you
 got
 a
  problem
 with
 that
 you
 can
 drag
 someone
 else’s
 ass
 to
 the
 woodshed
 ‘cause
 your
 stock’s
 at
  42
 and
 you’re
 done.
 
  SARNOFF.
  That’s
 not
 what
 happened.
 
  PHILO.
  You
 needed
 to
 pull
 a
 rabbit
 out
 of
 a
 hat.
 
  SARNOFF.
  That’s
 not
 what
 happened.
 
  PHILO.
  What
 am
 I
 getting
 wrong?
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 was
 already
 giving
 Zworykin
 two-­‐hundred
 thousand
 a
 year
 for
 research.
 I
 was
 already
  giving
 him
 a
 staff
 the
 size
 of—
 
  PHILO.
  And
 he
 wasn’t
 getting
 anywhere!
 And
 the
 market
 crashed
 right
 on
 your
 face
 and
 you
 had
 to
  let
 the
 station
 owners
 sell
 time
 on
 the
 news
 and
 you’d
 had
 it.
 Zworykin’s
 not
 getting
  anywhere.
 Enough.
 Go
 to
 my
 lab.
 
  SARNOFF.
  That’s
 not
 why
 it
 happened.
 
  PHILO.
  Why
 what
 happened?
 (beat)
 That’s
 not
 why
 what
 happened,
 David?
 
  SARNOFF.
  It’s
 called
 opposition
 research.
 
  PHILO.
  It’s
 also
 called
 corporate
 espionage,
 isn’t
 it?
 


  75
 
  SARNOFF.
  Pretty
 low-­‐tech
 espionage,
 wouldn’t
 you
 say?
 
  PHILO.
  I
 would.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Did
 he
 come
 in
 disguise,
 Philo?
 
 
 
  PHILO.
  No.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Did
 he
 give
 you
 a
 false
 name?
 
  PHILO.
  No.
 
  SARNOFF.
  He
 told
 you
 his
 name.
 
  PHILO.
  I
 knew
 his
 name.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Did
 he
 break
 into
 your
 lab?
 
  PHILO.
  I
 think
 we’ve
 been
 through
 this
 enough.
 
  SARNOFF.
  How
 did
 he
 get
 into
 your
 lab?
 
  PHILO.
  I
 invited
 him.
 
  SARNOFF.
  And
 up
 in
 the
 lab—
 
  PHILO.
  I’m
 not
 a
 professional
 witness
 anymore,
 I
 don’t—
 
  SARNOFF.
  -­‐-­‐did
 he
 hit
 you
 over
 the
 head,
 did
 he
 drug
 you,
 did
 he
 do
 something
 while
 your
 back
 was
  turned?
 
  PHILO.
  No.
 


  76
 
  SARNOFF.
  Don’t
 casually
 accuse
 me
 of
 theft.
 
  PHILO.
  I’m
 gonna
 accuse
 you
 of
 whatever
 I
 want,
 but
 if
 you
 think
 I’m
 doing
 it
 casually
 you’re
 out
 of
  your
 mind.
 You
 sent
 him
 to
 my
 lab.
 
  SARNOFF.
  It
 wasn’t
 like
 it
 was
 a
 secure
 area.
 
  PHILO.
  Scientists
 aren’t
 supposed
 to
 operate
 in
 secret,
 you
 share
 as
 much
 information
 as
 you
 can.
 
  SARNOFF.
  You
 were
 eager
 to
 show
 it
 to
 him.
 
  PHILO.
  I
 had
 a
 light
 problem.
 
  SARNOFF.
  No,
 you
 had
 a
 huge
 light
 problem.
 If
 you
 hadn’t,
 it
 would’ve
 been
 done
 by
 now.
 If
 you
  hadn’t,
 you
 would’ve
 owned
 television.
 If
 you
 hadn’t—somebody,
 somewhere—anybody— anywhere—anyone
 other
 than
 me—would
 have
 heard
 of
 you.
 
  PHILO.
  I
 really
 ended
 up
 in
 your
 nightmares,
 didn’t
 I?
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 sleep
 fine.
 
  PHILO.
  How
 did
 he
 know
 where
 I
 was?
 
  SARNOFF.
  (beat)
 What?
 
  PHILO.
  How
 did
 he
 know
 where—
 
  SARNOFF.
  Your
 lab
 was
 at
 202
 Green
 Street,
 he
 told
 the
 cab
 driver
 “Take
 me
 to
 202—“
 
  PHILO.
  It
 wasn’t
 at
 the
 lab
 when
 we
 met.
 How’d
 he
 know
 where
 I’d
 be?
 
 
 
 
 


  77
  SARNOFF
 (to
 the
 audience).
  Because
 he’d
 become
 a
 fairly
 famous
 guy
 in
 San
 Francisco.
 All
 the
 papers
 carried
 the
 story
  when
 he
 got
 that
 first
 picture
 but
 it
 was
 almost
 two
 years
 later
 and
 he
 still
 couldn’t
 get
 an
  image
 that
 was
 worth
 anything
 without
 focusing
 an
 impractical
 amount
 of
 light
 on
 the
  object.
 He
 was
 understandably
 obsessed
 with
 finding
 an
 answer
 and
 had
 taken
 to
 sleeping
  just
 two
 or
 three
 hours
 a
 night
 on
 a
 cot
 in
 the
 storage
 room.
 He
 had
 a
 son
 now,
 Kenny,
 who
  was
 20-­‐months-­‐old
 and
 every
 night
 around
 midnight
 when
 the
 others
 would
 go
 home
 to
  catch
 some
 sleep,
 he’d
 build
 Kenny
 a
 toy
 in
 the
 lab.
 One
 night
 he
 built
 him
 a
 sundial
 that
  would
 tell
 time
 on
 the
 moon.
 (beat)
 Told
 him
 he’d
 be
 able
 to
 use
 it
 one
 day.
 
 
  II.
 5A
 Philo’s
 Lab.
 
  EVERSON,
 GORRELL,
 STAN,
 HARLAN
 and
 AGNES
 are
 waiting.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Crocker,
 Everson
 and
 Gorrell
 had
 lost
 faith
 and
 money
 and
 were
 looking
 to
 sell
 The
  Farnsworth
 Television
 Company
 and
 on
 this
 morning,
 Philo
 was
 supposed
 to
 demonstrate
  television
 to
 the
 owners
 of
 United
 Artists.
 Everson
 and
 Gorrell
 were
 desperate
 to
 make
 a
  good
 impression.
 It
 wasn’t
 gonna
 happen.
 
  SCHENCK,
 FAIRBANKS,
 and
 PICKFORD
 are
 led
 in
 by
 CLIFF.
 
  EVERSON.
  Good
 morning,
 I’m
 George
 Everson.
 
  SCHENCK.
 
  Joseph
 Schenck.
 
  PICKFORD.
  It’s
 nice
 to
 meet
 you,
 I’m
 Mary
 Pickford,
 and
 this
 is
 Doug.
 
  EVERSON.
  Of
 course.
 It’s
 a
 pleasure.
 Leslie
 Gorrell.
 
  GORRELL.
  Good
 morning.
 
  SCHENCK.
  Please
 thank
 Bill
 Crocker
 for
 arranging
 this.
 
  EVERSON.
  No,
 it’s
 our
 pleasure.
 Philo
 should
 be
 here
 at
 any
 moment.
 (beat)
 You
 met
 Cliff.
 And
 this
 is
  Mr.
 Farnsworth’s
 sister,
 Agnes.
 
  AGNES.
  Hello.
 It’s
 such
 a
 pleasure
 to
 meet
 you.
 
 
 


  PICKFORD.
  How
 do
 you
 do?
 
  FAIRBANKS.
  Nice
 to
 meet
 you.
 
  AGNES.
  He
 should
 be
 out
 in
 just
 a
 moment.
 
  Awkward
 silence.
 
  EVERSON.
  This
 is
 Stan
 Willis.
 
  STAN.
  Hello.
 
  PICKFORD.
  Hello.
 
  FAIRBANKS.
  Hello.
 
  AGNES.
  And
 Harlan
 Honn.
 
  HARLAN.
  Hello.
 
  FAIRBANKS.
  Good
 to
 meet
 you.
 
  PICKFORD.
  Hello.
 
  EVERSON.
  (pause)
 Harlan’s
 been
 doing
 some
 incredible
 things
 with
 refrigeration.
 
  GORRELL.
  They
 don’t
 care.
 
  EVERSON.
  I
 thought
 while
 they
 were
 waiting
 they
 might
 like
 to
 hear
 about—
 
  GORRELL.
  No.
 Agnes,
 would
 you
 go
 back
 and
 get
 your
 brother?
 
 
 
 

78
 


  AGNES.
  Of
 course.
 I’m
 sure
 he’s
 making
 some
 last
 minute
 tube
 adjustments.
 (pause)
 That’s
  adjustments
 to
 the
 tube.
 
  GORRELL.
  We
 got
 that,
 Agnes.
 Could
 you
 please?
 
 
  II.
 5B
 
 Storage
 Room.
 
  AGNES.
 
  Philo?
 (pause)
 Philo?
 
  PHILO.
 
  Hello.
 
  AGNES.
 
  They’re
 here.
 
  PHILO.
  Who?
 
  AGNES.
  The
 people.
 
  PHILO.
  Now?
 
  AGNES.
  Yes,
 they’re
 in
 the
 lab.
 Straighten
 yourself
 up.
 
  PHILO.
  When
 are
 they
 getting
 here?
 
  AGNES.
  They’re
 here.
 
  PHILO.
  Right.
 You
 just
 said
 that.
 
  AGNES.
  Are
 you
 drunk?
 
  PHILO.
  No.
 Yes.
 Yes,
 I
 am.
 I
 don’t
 know.
 
  AGNES.
  God—
 
 

79
 


  80
  PHILO.
  We’ve
 gotta
 make
 it
 a
 fast
 one
 today,
 we
 have
 a—what’s
 the
 woman’s
 name
 again?
 
  AGNES.
  Mary
 Pickford.
 
  PHILO.
  Pickford,
 got
 it.
 
  AGNES.
  Yes,
 she
 the
 most
 famous
 woman
 in
 the
 world
 so
 there’s
 really
 no
 reason
 you
 would
 have
  heard
 of
 her.
 
  PHILO.
  I
 didn’t
 say
 I
 hadn’t
 heard
 of
 her,
 I
 just
 didn’t
 know
 it
 was
 her
 that
 was
 coming
 today.
  Pickford?
 
  AGNES.
  Pickford.
 
 
  II.
 5C
 Philo’s
 Lab.
 
  PHILO
 and
 AGNES
 enter.
 
  PHILO.
  Good
 morning,
 everyone.
 I’m
 sorry.
 I’m
 Philo
 Farnsworth.
 
  EVERSON.
  Philo,
 this
 is
 Joe
 Schenck.
 
  PHILO.
  Nice
 to
 meet
 you.
 This
 is
 the
 lab
 gang.
 
  PEM
 enters.
 
  PEM.
  Excuse
 me.
 
  PHILO.
  And
 this
 is
 my
 wife,
 Pem.
 
  PEM.
  Nice
 to
 meet
 you.
 
  SCHENCK.
  Likewise.
 
 
 


  PHILO.
  Pem,
 this
 is
 Mary
 Pickford.
 
  PEM.
  I’m
 a
 great
 admirer.
 
  PICKFORD.
  Thank
 you.
 Aren’t
 you
 sweet?
 
  PHILO.
  And,
 of
 course,
 a
 man
 who
 needs
 no
 introduction,
 Mr.
 Charlie
 Chaplin.
 
  AGNES.
  Philo!
 
  FAIRBANKS.
  (beat)
 Were
 you
 talking
 about
 me?
 
  PHILO.
  Yes.
 
  FAIRBANKS.
  I’m
 Doug
 Fairbanks.
 
  PHILO.
  Dammit.
 
  PEM
 (to
 FAIRBANKS).
  Of
 course
 you
 are
 and
 you’re
 wonderful.
 
  PHILO.
  I
 apologize,
 Mr.
 Chaplin.
 
 
  AGNES.
  Philo!
 
  PHILO.
  Mr.
 Fairbanks.
 
  GORRELL.
  I’ve
 stepped
 off
 the
 edge
 of
 the
 world.
 
  FAIRBANKS.
  Chaplin’s
 shorter
 and
 considerably
 more
 talented.
 
  PICKFORD.
  Charlie
 did
 want
 to
 be
 here
 today
 but
 he’s
 on
 a
 scoring
 stage.
 
 
 

81
 


  EVERSON.
  Why
 don’t
 we
 start
 the
 demonstration?
 
  GORRELL.
  Yes,
 for
 the
 love
 of
 everything
 holy.
 
  PHILO.
  Sure.
 
  PEM.
  I’m
 sorry.
 May
 I
 speak
 with
 you,
 Philo?
 
  PHILO.
  Now?
 
  PEM.
  Yes.
 
  PHILO.
  Excuse
 me,
 please.
 
 
  II.
 5D
 Corridor.
 
  PEM.
  Kenny’s
 still
 got
 the
 cough.
 
  PHILO.
  All
 night?
 
  PEM.
  Yeah.
 
  PHILO.
  Where
 is
 he
 now?
 
  PEM.
  Mrs.
 Palmer’s
 sitting
 with
 him.
 
 I
 want
 to
 take
 him
 to
 the
 doctor
 Bill
 recommended.
 
  PHILO.
  Sure.
 Absolutely.
 
  PEM.
  It’s
 gonna
 cost
 $10
 just
 for
 the
 visit.
 
  PHILO.
  Well
 then
 that’s
 what
 it
 costs.
 
 
 

82
 


  83
  PEM.
  Okay.
 Go
 back
 to
 work.
 
  PHILO.
  Okay.
 
 
  II.
 5E
 Philo’s
 Lab.
 
  PHILO.
  Okay.
 When
 light
 hits
 Mary
 Pickford
 it
 gets
 excited.
 The
 photons—light
 is
 made
 up
 of
  photons—the
 photons
 get
 excited,
 which
 means
 they
 move.
 Now,
 once
 they
 move,
 they
 can
  be
 manipulated
 by
 photoelectric
 material
 and
 captured
 in
 this
 tube.
 And
 then
 they
 can
 be
  sent
 by
 an
 electronic
 transmitter
 to
 a
 cathode.
 A
 cathode
 makes
 photons
 glow.
 So
 what
  have
 we
 done—well,
 we’ve
 re-­‐constructed
 a
 light
 image
 of
 Mary
 Pickford,
 formed
 by
 the
  photons
 she
 excited.
 And
 though
 the
 effect
 is
 almost
 instantaneous,
 it’s
 done
 line
 by
  horizontal
 line.
 
  FAIRBANKS.
  Extraordinary.
 
  PHILO.
  Wouldn’t
 you
 think
 so,
 Charlie?
 
  AGNES.
  Philo!
 
  FAIRBANKS.
  Doug.
 
  PHILO.
  But
 here’s
 the
 problem.
 
  PICKFORD.
  What.
 
  PHILO.
  It
 doesn’t
 work.
 
  GORRELL.
  It
 works.
 He’s
 kidding.
 
  AGNES.
  My
 brother
 has
 a
 playful
 sense
 of
 humor.
 
  PHILO.
  Yeah
 it
 works,
 you’re
 gonna
 see
 it
 work,
 but
 it
 doesn’t
 work
 well.
 The
 amount
 of
 light
  needed
 to
 get
 a
 picture
 would
 blind
 you.
 You
 know
 why?
 (pause)
 No,
 I’m
 really
 asking,
  doesn’t
 anyone
 know
 why?
 
 


  84
 
 
  II.
 6
 Crocker’s
 Office.
 
  CROCKER.
  It
 doesn’t
 work?
 You
 told
 the
 owners
 of
 United
 Artists
 that
 it
 doesn’t
 work?
 
  PHILO.
  Not
 all
 the
 owners.
 Chaplin
 was
 on
 a
 scoring
 stage.
 
  CROCKER.
  It
 doesn’t
 work?
 
  PHILO.
  I
 said
 it
 didn’t
 work
 well.
 
  CROCKER.
  Oh,
 much
 better.
 
  PHILO.
  Bill,
 United
 Artists
 wasn’t
 buying,
 neither
 was
 Philco,
 neither
 was
 Magnavox.
 
  CROCKER.
  How
 do
 you
 know
 United
 Artists
 wasn’t
 buying?
 
  PHILO.
  Because
 it
 doesn’t
 work
 very
 well.
 
  CROCKER.
  I
 think
 your
 presentation
 could
 have
 been
 sunnier.
 
  PHILO.
  I
 shouldn’t
 be
 showing
 it
 yet,
 it’s
 not
 ready.
 It’s
 embarrassing
 to
 me.
 
  CROCKER.
  How
 do
 you
 mix
 up
 Charlie
 Chaplin
 with
 Errol
 Flynn?
 
  PHILO.
  I
 mixed
 him
 up
 with
 Douglas
 Fairbanks
 but
 I
 think
 that’s
 the
 least
 of
 our
 concerns.
 
  CROCKER.
  What
 should
 be
 the
 most
 of
 our
 concerns?
 
  PHILO.
  I
 have
 light
 falling
 on
 the
 cesium
 oxide
 coating
 and
 I
 charge
 it
 up
 with
 electrons.
 I
 move
 the
  charged
 image
 along
 an
 electrode,
 an
 aperture.
 And
 that’s
 where
 the
 light
 dissipates.
 Bill,
 it
  is
 impossible
 that
 this
 problem
 can’t
 be
 solved.
 It’s
 something
 small
 and
 it’s
 right
 under
 our
  noses.
 
 


  GORRELL.
  How
 many
 times
 have
 you
 built
 and
 torn
 apart
 the
 image
 dissector?
 
  PHILO.
  I
 don’t
 know.
 I’d
 have
 to
 check
 the
 journals.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Guess.
 
  PHILO.
  Two
 thousand
 times.
 
  GORRELL.
  Jesus.
 
  PHILO
 (to
 CROCKER).
  I
 know
 it’s
 right
 under
 our
 noses.
 
  CROCKER
 (to
 EVERSON
 and
 GORELL).
  Lemme
 talk
 to
 Philo
 for
 a
 minute.
 
  EVERSON.
  Chaplin
 is
 the
 Little
 Tramp.
 Fairbanks
 is
 the
 swashbuckler.
 
  PHILO.
  I
 don’t
 think
 they
 walk
 around
 town
 like
 that,
 but
 thanks
 George.
 
  CROCKER.
  One
 in
 four
 adult
 American
 males
 is
 unemployed.
 
  PHILO.
  I
 know.
 
  CROCKER.
  25
 per
 cent.
 
  PHILO.
  Am
 I
 about
 to
 be
 one
 of
 them?
 
  CROCKER.
  The
 economy’s
 not
 turning
 around
 is
 my
 point.
 
  PHILO.
  It
 will.
 
  CROCKER.
  Do
 you
 know
 when?
 
 
 

85
 


  86
  PHILO.
  No.
 
  CROCKER.
  Do
 you
 know
 when
 you’ll
 have
 a
 picture
 suitable
 for
 commercial
 use?
 
  PHILO.
  No.
 
  CROCKER.
  Those
 two
 answers
 work
 terribly
 together.
 
  PHILO.
  Before
 this
 century
 is
 over,
 a
 man
 is
 gonna
 walk
 on
 the
 moon.
 I
 swear
 to
 God
 that’s
 gonna
  happen.
 And
 everyone
 in
 the
 world
 is
 gonna
 watch
 him
 do
 it
 on
 television.
 
  CROCKER.
  (pause)
 We’re
 sure
 it’s
 just
 engineering?
 
  PHILO.
  Absolutely
 sure.
 
  CROCKER.
  (beat)
 You’ll
 try
 to
 make
 your
 presentations
 a
 little
 more
 optimistic?
 
  PHILO.
  I
 will.
 
  CROCKER.
  All
 right.
 
  PHILO
 starts
 to
 leave,
 then
 turns
 back.
 
  PHILO.
  (pause)
 Bill,
 you
 know,
 I
 always
 meant
 to
 tell
 you
 I
 know
 you
 took
 a
 beating
 in
 the
 stock
  market
 crash,
 and
 I’ve
 always
 meant
 to
 tell
 you
 that
 I
 really
 admired
 the
 way
 you
 hung
 in
  there
 with
 Boeing.
 You
 didn’t
 sell
 your
 shares.
 I
 was
 a
 real
 act
 of—I
 don’t
 know,
 it
 was
 a
  real
 act
 of
 patriotism
 I
 think.
 You
 could’ve—
 
  CROCKER.
  I
 didn’t
 take
 a
 beating
 in
 the
 market.
 I
 was
 quiet
 about
 it
 that
 day,
 but
 I
 sold
 my
 Boeing
  stock.
 
  PHILO.
  (beat)
 Well,
 that’s
 ok
 too,
 you
 got
 a
 family.
 
  CROCKER.
  No.
 My
 father’s
 gonna
 come
 back
 from
 the
 grave
 and
 punch
 me
 in
 the
 head.
 My
 father
 and
  his
 brothers,
 you
 know
 how
 they
 built
 the
 railroad.
 They
 wanted
 me
 to
 do
 what’s
 next.
 


  87
 
  PHILO.
  You
 are.
 Don’t
 sell
 your
 shares
 of
 The
 Farnsworth
 Television
 Company.
 I’m
 not
 gonna
 make
  a
 fool
 outta
 you.
 
  CROCKER.
  Well
 that
 ship
 sailed
 a
 long
 time
 ago
 but
 I
 appreciate
 it.
 Go
 home
 and
 get
 some
 sleep.
 
  PHILO.
  I’m
 gonna
 meet
 my
 guys
 at
 the
 place
 and
 go
 back
 up
 to
 the
 lab.
 
 
  II.
 7
 
 Speakeasy
 
  SARNOFF.
  The
 sale
 or
 consumption
 of
 alcohol
 was
 against
 the
 law
 that
 year—a
 law
 that
 never
  produced
 fewer
 drinkers,
 just
 more
 criminals.
 How
 did
 I
 know
 where
 he’d
 be?
 ‘Cause
 I
  knew
 where
 he
 drank.
 
  CLIFF,
 STAN
 and
 HARLAN
 are
 entertaining
 FOUR
 YOUNG
 WOMEN,
 whose
 faces
 aren’t
 seen.
 
  SARNOFF.
  There
 was
 a
 chess
 club
 on
 Green
 Street
 where
 for
 a
 nickel
 you
 could
 sit
 down
 and
 play
  chess
 or
 backgammon
 and
 have
 a
 cup
 of
 coffee
 or
 a
 cream
 soda.
 If
 they
 knew
 you,
 you
 could
  go
 in
 the
 back
 room.
 
  CLIFF
 (rising
 with
 STAN
 to
 greet
 him).
  Philo!
 
  STAN.
  Everything
 all
 right
 over
 there?
 
  PHILO.
  Yeah.
 
  STAN.
  Crocker’s
 not
 mad?
 
  PHILO.
  No,
 he’s
 mad,
 but—
 
  CLIFF.
  We’re
 all
 right?
 
  PHILO.
  Yeah.
 
 Where
 did
 you
 meet
 the
 women?
 
 
 
 


  88
  CLIFF.
  They’re
 secretaries
 from
 back
 east.
 They’re
 on
 vacation
 in
 San
 Francisco
 and
 they
 got
 in
  here
 somehow.
 You
 know,
 Philo,
 seriously,
 working
 in
 television
 has
 made
 it
 easier
 to
 meet
  girls.
 
  PHILO.
  (beat)
 Well
 then
 it’s
 all
 been
 worth
 it,
 Cliff.
 
  STAN.
  And
 that
 man
 at
 the
 bar
 has
 been
 asking
 when
 you’ll
 be
 in.
 
  PHILO.
  Who
 is
 he?
 
  CLIFF.
  I
 don’t
 know,
 he’s
 Russian.
 
  PHILO.
  You
 guys
 get
 the
 secretaries,
 I
 get
 the
 Russian
 at
 the
 bar.
 
  STAN.
  That’s
 the
 only
 reason
 Pem
 lets
 us
 live.
 
  PHILO
 moves
 to
 the
 bar.
 
 
 BARTENDER.
  Bushmills
 rocks?
 
  PHILO.
  Yes.
 Thanks.
 You
 know,
 Leslie
 Gorrell
 says
 I’m
 drinking
 too
 much.
 So
 does
 Pem.
 
  BARTENDER.
  Nah.
 I’ll
 let
 you
 know.
 
  PHILO.
  Excuse
 me.
 You
 were
 asking
 after
 me.
 I’m
 Philo
 Farnsworth.
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  Relative
 to
 what?
 
  PHILO.
  I’m
 sorry.
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  They
 say
 you’re
 drinking
 too
 much.
 Relative
 to
 what?
 
  PHILO.
  You’re
 Vladimir
 Zworykin.
 
 


  89
  ZWORYKIN.
  Yes.
 And
 I’ve
 come
 to
 meet
 you.
 
  PHILO.
  Maybe
 my
 wife’s
 right,
 maybe
 God
 did
 walk
 in
 Utah.
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  Is
 that
 what
 she
 thinks?
 
  PHILO.
  I
 meant
 that
 you
 couldn’t
 have
 come
 at
 a
 better
 time.
 I’m
 really
 happy
 to
 meet
 you.
 My
  whole
 lab
 follows
 your
 work
 really
 closely.
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  What
 I
 would
 like,
 I
 would
 like
 to
 have
 a
 drink
 with
 you.
 Then
 we
 go
 across
 the
 street
 and
  you
 show
 me
 your
 image
 dissector.
 This
 device
 that
 breaks
 light
 down
 line
 by
 line—the
  way
 we
 plow
 a
 field.
 (beat)
 I
 follow
 you
 closely
 too.
 
  PHILO.
  We’re
 gonna
 do
 better
 than
 that.
 (calling)
 Fellas.
 (to
 ZWORYKIN)
 We’re
 gonna
 have
 a
 drink,
  go
 across
 the
 street,
 and
 then
 build
 one
 right
 in
 front
 of
 you.
 (to
 CLIFF,
 STAN
 and
 HARLAN)
  Guys,
 come
 meet
 Vladimir
 Zworykin.
 
 
  II.
 8
 
 Philo’s
 Lab
 
  SARNOFF.
  To
 his
 credit,
 Zworykin
 didn’t
 want
 to
 go
 to
 San
 Francisco.
 He
 was
 a
 proud
 man
 who’d
 been
  working
 on
 television
 his
 whole
 life
 and
 always
 felt
 like
 he
 was
 one
 small
 step
 away.
 Up
 in
  the
 lab
 they
 opened
 another
 bottle
 and
 began
 building
 an
 image
 dissector.
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  I
 was
 in
 Berlin
 when
 the
 war
 broke
 out
 in
 1914
 after
 leaving
 the
 lab
 of—
 
  STAN.
  Paul
 Langevin.
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  Yes.
 In
 Paris.
 I
 went
 back
 to
 St.
 Petersburg,
 when
 is
 now
 Leningrad,
 and
 was—what’s
 the
  word
 when
 you’re
 taken
 into
 the
 army—
 
  PHILO.
  Conscripted.
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  I
 was
 conscripted.
 I
 was
 a
 lieutenant
 assigned
 to
 the
 Russian
 Wireless
 Telegraph
 and
  Telephone
 Company
 and
 I
 made
 a
 close
 study
 of
 the
 latest
 in
 vacuum
 tubes.
 I
 also
 made
 a
  close
 study
 of
 young
 dental
 student
 named
 Tatiana
 Vasilieff.
 
 


  90
  STAN.
  Your
 wife.
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  Correct.
 
  HARLAN.
  Now
 this
 rod
 will
 be
 hot,
 Mr.
 Zworykin,
 you
 don’t
 want
 to—
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  I
 know
 exactly
 how
 hot
 it
 is.
 
  HARLAN.
  Yes
 sir.
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  I
 was
 certain
 after
 my
 success
 with
 Rosing,
 with
 Langevin
 and
 with
 the
 vacuum
 tubes,
 I
  would
 develop
 a
 method
 by
 which
 we
 could
 see
 from
 a
 distance.
 Then
 I
 found
 out
 the
 police
  were
 looking
 for
 me.
 
  STAN.
  Why?
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  They
 were
 having
 a
 revolution.
 
  STAN.
  Ah.
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  Yeah.
 (beat)
 The
 things
 I
 coulda
 done.
 The
 fucking
 things
 I
 coulda
 done.
 
  CLIFF
 enters
 with
 a
 glass
 tube.
 
  CLIFF.
  Here
 it
 is.
 
  PHILO.
  Cliff’s
 tube
 will
 have
 to
 cool
 for
 a
 couple
 of
 hours
 but
 let
 me
 show
 you
 what
 it
 looks
 like
  when
 it
 does.
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  Tatiana
 went
 to
 Germany.
 I
 went
 to
 Pittsburgh.
 
  STAN.
  Pittsburgh’s
 all
 right.
 I’ve
 been
 to
 Pittsburgh.
 
  ZWORYKIN
 (handling
 the
 tube).
  I
 don’t
 understand.
 


  91
 
  PHILO.
  You
 see
 something
 we
 did
 wrong?
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  No.
 The
 seal
 on
 the
 tube.
 The
 Pyrex
 seal.
 You’ve
 sealed
 an
 optically
 clear
 disk
 of
 Pyrex
 onto
  the
 end
 of
 the
 dissector
 tube.
 
  PHILO.
  Cliff
 did.
 Yeah,
 that
 was
 one
 of
 our
 breakthroughs.
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  I’d
 been
 assured,
 both
 by
 Westinghouse
 and
 GE,
 I’d
 been
 assured
 that
 this
 couldn’t
 be
 done.
 
  PHILO.
  Well,
 don’t
 feel
 bad,
 I’d
 been
 assured
 of
 the
 same
 thing
 by
 every
 glassblower
 in
 San
  Francisco.
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  How’d
 you
 do
 it?
 
  CLIFF.
  Me?
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  Yes.
 
  CLIFF.
  I
 didn’t
 know
 any
 better.
 
  AGNES
 enters.
 
  AGNES.
  Philo—
 
  PHILO.
  Aggie,
 what
 are
 you
 doing
 here
 so
 late?
 
  AGNES.
  Come
 with
 me
 quick,
 Philo.
 It’s
 Kenny.
 
 
  II.
 9
 Hospital.
 
  PEM.
 
  These
 are
 the
 doctors.
 This
 is
 my
 husband.
 
 
 
 


  92
  DOCTOR
 1.
  It’s
 a
 streptococcal
 infection
 and
 we’re
 concerned
 it
 might
 spread
 to
 his
 lungs.
 We
 want
 to
  perform
 a
 preventative
 tracheotomy
 and
 we
 want
 to
 do
 it
 immediately.
 
  PHILO.
  You’re
 not
 going
 to
 cut
 my
 son’s
 throat
 open
 so
 let’s
 figure
 out
 something
 else.
 
  DOCTOR
 1.
  Sir—
 
  PHILO.
  He’s
 two
 years
 old,
 we’re
 gonna
 figure
 out
 something
 else.
 
  DOCTOR
 2.
  There
 isn’t
 anything
 else.
 
  PHILO.
  Talk
 me
 through
 the
 problem.
 
  DOCTOR
 1.
  Mr.
 Farnsworth,
 we
 don’t
 have
 time
 to
 teach
 you
 medicine.
 
  PHILO.
  I’m
 a
 very
 quick
 study.
 
  DOCTOR
 2.
  Look—
 
  PHILO.
  The
 infection,
 is
 it
 caused
 by
 a
 virus
 or
 is
 it
 caused
 by
 a
 bacteria.
 
  DOCTOR
 2.
  Bacteria.
 
  PHILO.
  Can
 alcohol
 be
 injected
 selectively
 into
 cells?
 
  DOCTOR
 2.
  Why
 would
 you
 want
 to
 inject-­‐-­‐-­‐
 
  PHILO.
  It
 kills
 germs.
 
  DOCTOR
 1.
  No,
 it
 can’t
 be
 injected
 selectively.
 
  PHILO.
  Why
 not?
 
 


  93
  PEM.
  Phil—
 
  PHILO.
  Why
 not?
 
  DOCTOR
 2.
  Can
 you
 imagine
 the
 size
 of
 the
 instrument
 I’d
 need
 to
 do
 that?
 
  PHILO.
  All
 right.
 
  DOCTOR
 2.
  Look,
 we
 need
 to
 clear
 the
 trachea
 and
 the
 only
 way
 to
 do
 that—
 
  PHILO.
  No.
 Tissue
 is
 full
 of
 salt
 water,
 salt
 water
 conducts
 electricity.
 What
 if
 we
 put
 electro-­‐ magnets
 on
 the
 outside
 of
 his
 throat?
 
  DOCTOR
 1.
  Sir—
 
  PHILO.
  Listen
 to
 me,
 a
 coil
 that
 wraps
 around
 his
 throat—
 
  DOCTOR
 2.
  Even
 if
 there
 were
 such
 a
 device—
 
  PHILO.
  I
 can
 build
 one.
 
  PEM.
  Phil.
 
  PHILO.
  It’ll
 take
 me
 two
 hours.
 I
 can
 build
 one.
 
  DOCTOR
 1.
  Mr.
 Farnsworth,
 Dr.
 Westbrook
 needs
 to
 begin
 preparing
 your
 son
 for
 surgery.
 You’ll
 need
  to
 stay
 out
 here.
 
  PHILO.
  I
 can
 build
 one.
 
  DOCTOR
 1.
  You’ll
 need
 to
 say
 out
 here.
 
 
 
 


  94
  II.
 10A
 
 Radio
 City
 Music
 Hall
 Lobby.
 
  ANNOUNCER.
  Ladies
 and
 gentlemen,
 welcome
 to
 the
 opening
 of
 the
 greatest
 auditorium
 on
 earth,
 the
  Radio
 City
 Musical
 Hall.
 
  USHER
 (holding
 a
 telephone
 as
 SARNOFF
 enters
 in
 tuxedo).
  Mr.
 Sarnoff.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Yeah.
 
  USHER.
  For
 you,
 sir.
 
  SARNOFF.
  This
 is
 David.
 (listens)
 Yeah.
 (listens)
 I’ll
 be
 there
 to
 see
 it
 first
 thing
 in
 the
 morning.
 
  LIZETTE
 enters
 in
 evening
 gown.
 
  LIZETTE.
  David—
 
  SARNOFF.
  That
 was
 Charlie,
 that
 was
 good
 news.
 
  LIZETTE.
  What
 is
 it?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Vladimir
 got
 a
 picture.
 A
 clear
 one
 using
 manageable
 light.
 
  LIZETTE.
  Vladimir
 got
 a
 picture?
 
  SARNOFF.
  A
 good
 picture
 with
 photographers’
 lamps.
 Charlie
 says
 it’s
 the
 clearest
 picture
 that’s
 ever
  been
 transmitted.
 
  LIZETTE.
  So
 now
 what
 happens?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Well
 I’m
 gonna
 take
 the
 train
 down
 to
 Camden
 in
 the
 morning
 and
 see
 for
 myself.
 
  LIZETTE.
  I
 don’t
 understand.
 
 
 


  SARNOFF.
  I’m
 gonna
 go
 to
 Camden
 in
 the
 morning.
 
  LIZETTE.
  And
 then
 what?
 
  SARNOFF.
  What
 do
 you
 mean?
 
  LIZETTE.
  I
 don’t
 understand.
 
  SARNOFF.
  I’m
 taking
 a
 railroad
 train
 to
 Camden
 in
 the
 morning
 and
 looking
 at
 the
 picture.
 
  LIZETTE.
  And
 then
 what
 do
 you
 do
 with
 it?
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 do
 what
 I
 do.
 
  LIZETTE
 (to
 USHER).
  I’m
 Mrs.
 Sarnoff,
 could
 I
 have
 my
 coat
 please.
 I’m
 leaving.
 
  SARNOFF.
  What
 the
 hell
 are
 you—
 
  LIZETTE.
  I’m
 leaving.
 (to
 USHER)
 I’ll
 be
 waiting
 out
 front.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Liz.
 Liz.
 
  LIZETTE
 exits.
 
  SARNOFF
 (to
 USHER)
  It’s
 a
 lot
 of
 fun
 being
 me.
 
 
  II.
 10B
 Street.
 
  SARNOFF.
  You’re
 gonna
 freeze
 out
 here.
 
  LIZETTE.
  No,
 I’m
 not.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Well
 I’m
 gonna
 freeze
 out
 here.
 

95
 


  96
 
  LIZETTE.
  Tatiana
 Zworykin
 said
 Vladimir
 went
 to
 San
 Francisco
 last
 month.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Let’s
 go
 back
 inside.
 
  LIZETTE.
  Did
 he
 visit
 Farnsworth’s
 lab?
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 have
 no
 idea.
 
  LIZETTE.
  You’re
 full
 of
 shit,
 David.
 
  USHER.
  Your
 coat,
 Mrs.
 Sarnoff.
 
  LIZETTE.
  Thank
 you.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Thank
 you.
 (to
 LIZETTE).
 If
 we
 have
 this
 conversation
 in
 private
 then
 there’s
 less
 chance
  I’m
 gonna
 read
 a
 transcript
 of
 it
 in
 the
 newspapers
 tomorrow.
 
  LIZETTE.
  How
 is
 it
 that
 for
 ten
 years
 Vladimir
 can’t
 get
 a
 picture
 and
 then
 a
 month
 after
 he
 gets
 back
  from
 San
 Francisco,
 Charlie
 Strauss
 says
 Vladimir’s
 got
 the
 clearest—
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 don’t
 know.
 
  LIZETTE.
  Where
 has
 Betsy
 been?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Who
 the
 hell
 is
 Betsy?
 
  LIZETTE.
  Your
 secretary.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Betty.
 
  LIZETTE.
  Where
 has
 she
 been?
 
 
 


  97
  SARNOFF.
  She’s
 been
 on
 vacation.
 
  LIZETTE.
  In
 San
 Francisco.
 For
 five
 weeks.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Her
 mother
 lives
 in
 San
 Francisco,
 her
 mother
 is
 sick.
 
  LIZETTE.
  What’s
 the
 Get
 Around
 Farnsworth
 Department?
 
  SARNOFF.
  What’s
 happened
 to
 you
 tonight?
 
  LIZETTE.
  I’ve
 heard
 people
 talk
 about
 the
 Get
 Around
 Farnsworth
 Department.
 You’re
 obsessed—
 
  SARNOFF.
  Liz—
 
  LIZETTE.
  -­‐-­‐with
 this
 ridiculous
 thing
 which
 will
 at
 best
 be
 a
 toy
 for
 rich
 people.
 
  SARNOFF.
  That’s
 not
 what
 it’s
 gonna
 be.
 
  LIZETTE.
  That
 wasn’t
 the
 point.
 
  SARNOFF.
  That’s
 not
 what
 it’s
 gonna
 be
 and
 that
 is
 the
 point.
 It’s
 gonna
 change
 everything.
 It’s
 gonna
  end
 ignorance
 and
 misunderstanding.
 It’s
 gonna
 end
 illiteracy.
 It’s
 gonna
 end
 war.
 
 
  LIZETTE.
  How?!
 
  SARNOFF.
  By
 pointing
 a
 camera
 at
 it.
 
  LIZETTE.
  You
 think
 if
 Germany
 knows
 we
 can
 see
 them
 they
 won’t
 march
 across
 Europe?
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 think
 when
 we
 see
 them
 do
 it
 we’ll
 stop
 them.
 
  LIZETTE.
  I
 think
 you
 need
 a
 vacation.
 
 


  98
  SARNOFF.
  So
 you
 brought
 me
 out
 here
 to
 the
 sidewalk?
 
  LIZETTE.
  You
 think
 I’m
 being
 funny?
 You
 know
 what
 you’ve
 done.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Zworykin
 applied
 for
 a
 patent
 four
 years
 before
 Farnsworth.
 
  LIZETTE.
  His
 didn’t
 work.
 
  SARNOFF.
  U.S.
 patent
 law
 is
 very
 complicated.
 
  LIZETTE.
  Is
 it?
 
  SARNOFF.
  In
 ’23
 Zworykin
 made
 what
 are
 called
 generic
 claims
 which,
 with
 modifications— engineering—now
 work.
 
  LIZETTE.
  How?
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 don’t
 know
 yet,
 I’m
 taking
 a
 train
 to
 Camden
 in
 the
 morning.
 
  LIZETTE.
  It
 works
 because
 he
 got
 something
 from
 Farnsworth
 and
 that’s
 what
 you
 sent
 him
 to
 do.
  You
 knew
 you
 weren’t
 marrying
 a
 stupid
 woman.
 (beat)
 I
 think
 you
 just
 stole
 television.
 
 
  II.
 11
 Crocker’s
 Office.
 
  PHILO.
  What
 happened,
 what’s
 going
 on?
 
  CROCKER.
  This
 is
 David
 Lippincott.
 He’s
 your
 lawyer.
 I’ll
 pay
 the
 bills.
 
  LIPPINCOTT.
  Mr.
 Farnsworth,
 I
 want
 you
 to
 know
 that
 I
 got
 a
 degree
 in
 electrical
 engineering
 before
  attending
 Law
 School
 ad
 becoming
 president
 of
 the
 Patent
 Law
 Association
 of
 San
  Francisco.
 
  PHILO.
  What
 the
 hell
 is
 going
 on?
 
 


  99
  CROCKER.
  Vladimir
 Zworykin
 at
 the
 Westinghouse
 Lab
 transmitted
 an
 electronic
 image.
 
  PHILO.
  I’m
 sure
 he
 did,
 we
 showed
 him
 how.
 
  CROCKER.
  You
 showed
 him
 how?
 
  LIPPINCOTT.
  When?
 
  PHILO.
  He
 was
 out
 here
 three
 months
 ago.
 
  CROCKER.
  What
 are
 you
 telling
 us?
 
  PHILO.
  He
 was
 out
 here.
 He
 came
 in
 the
 place,
 he
 wanted
 to
 see
 the
 lab.
 We
 built
 an
 image
  dissector
 for
 him.
 What
 are
 you
 saying?
 
  CROCKER.
  He
 went
 back
 to
 Camden,
 New
 Jersey
 and
 reverse
 engineered
 it.
 
  PHILO.
  He
 doesn’t
 work
 in
 Camden,
 he
 works
 in
 Pittsburgh.
 
  CROCKER.
  Westinghouse
 moved
 their
 labs
 to
 Camden
 when
 RCA
 bought
 Victor
 Talking
 Machines.
  Westinghouse
 isn’t
 a
 sister
 company
 under
 GE
 anymore,
 it’s
 part
 of
 RCA.
 
  PHILO.
  What
 does
 any
 of
 that
 matter?
 
  CROCKER.
  David
 Sarnoff
 bought
 Westinghouse
 so
 he’d
 own
 Zworykin’s
 1923
 patent,
 which
 now
  works.
 
  PHILO.
  Zworykin
 didn’t
 need
 to
 come
 to
 my
 lab
 to
 find
 out
 how
 to
 make
 an
 image
 dissector.
 A
  patent
 application’s
 public.
 I
 have
 to
 say
 exactly
 what
 I’m
 gonna
 do
 and
 how
 I’m
 gonna
 do
  it.
 It’s
 an
 instruction
 manual,
 all
 he
 had
 to
 do
 was
 read
 it.
 
  LIPPINCOTT.
  That’s
 not
 all
 he
 had
 to
 do.
 
  PHILO.
  What
 do
 you
 mean?
 


  100
 
  CROCKER.
  Apparently
 it’s
 a
 very
 good
 picture
 and
 he’s
 only
 using
 Klieg
 Lamps.
 
  PHILO.
  Wait.
 Are
 you
 saying
 he
 stole
 from
 us
 or
 are
 you
 saying
 he’s
 got
 something
 we
 don’t
 have?
 
  CROCKER.
  It
 has
 to
 be
 both.
 
  PHILO.
  (pause)
 I
 think
 you’re
 being
 paranoid.
 
  CROCKER.
  Philo—
 
  PHILO.
  There’s
 an
 international
 community
 of
 scientists
 which,
 at
 this
 level,
 shares—
 
  LIPPICOTT
 (holding
 up
 issue
 of
 the
 Chronicle).
  Do
 you
 remember
 this
 newspaper
 story?
 
  PHILO.
  That’s
 when
 we
 got
 the
 first
 picture,
 yes.
 
  LIPPINCOTT.
  Philo,
 you’ve
 been
 at
 war
 with
 David
 Sarnoff
 since
 the
 day
 this
 showed
 up
 in
 New
 York
 City.
  (beat)
 So
 what
 we’re
 gonna
 do
 is
 this.
 We’re
 gonna
 file
 a
 patent
 interference
 suit.
 We’re
  gonna
 take
 depositions
 and
 submit
 briefs
 to
 a
 lay
 court
 and
 ask
 it
 to
 grant
 priority
 of
  invention.
 
  PHILO.
  And
 what
 happens
 then?
 
  LIPPINCOTT.
  A
 judge
 in
 Delaware
 is
 going
 to
 decide
 who
 invented
 television.
 
  CROCKER.
  (beat)
 Can
 you
 think
 of
 anything
 offhand
 that
 he
 might
 have
 seen
 in
 the
 lab
 that
 wasn’t
 in
  your
 original
 invention?
 
  PHILO
 doesn’t
 say
 anything
 but
 he
 knows
 the
 answer.
 
  CROCKER.
  Anything
 with
 the
 cesium?
 Potassium?
 Anything
 with
 the
 transmitter?
 
  PHILO.
  It
 was
 the
 Pyrex
 seal.
 He
 didn’t
 know
 there
 was
 a
 way
 to
 seal
 the
 tube.
 
 


  101
  SARNOFF.
  Nobody
 lied
 and
 nobody
 broke
 the
 law.
 
  PHILO
 (to
 SARNOFF).
  Who
 were
 the
 girls
 in
 the
 bar?
 
 
  II.
 12
 Speakeasy.
 
  STAN
 (calling
 to
 PHILO).
  Philo!
 
  PHILO
 stands
 there
 and
 STAN
 comes
 to
 him.
 
  STAN.
  Philo,
 you’ve
 been
 standing
 in
 the
 doorway
 for
 two
 minutes.
 
  PHILO.
  The
 secretaries
 are
 here
 again?
 
  STAN.
  Yeah,
 but
 Harlan
 and
 I
 had
 a
 new
 idea
 we
 wanted
 to—
 
  PHILO.
  Excuse
 me.
 
  PHILO
 crosses
 to
 the
 table
 where
 the
 women
 are
 seated,
 one
 of
 whom
 is
 BETTY.
 
  HARLAN.
  Philo!
 Ladies,
 this
 is
 the
 boy
 genius,
 this
 is
 Philo
 Farnsworth.
 
  BETTY.
  Nice
 to
 meet
 you.
 
  PHILO.
  What’s
 your
 name?
 
  BETTY
 knows
 immediately
 that
 PHILO
 knows
 who
 they
 are.
 
  HARLAN.
  (pause)
 This
 is
 Betty.
 And
 this
 is
 Helen
 and—
 
  PHILO.
  Where
 do
 you
 work?
 
  HARLAN.
  (beat)
 They’re
 on
 vacation
 from
 New
 York,
 Philo.
 Betty’s
 seeing
 after
 her
 mom,
 who—
 
 
 


  102
  PHILO.
  Where
 do
 you
 work?
 
  HARLAN.
  They’re
 secretaries.
 
  PHILO.
  Where
 do
 you
 work?
 
  HARLAN.
  What’s
 going
 on?
 
  BETTY.
  I’m
 secretary
 to
 David
 Sarnoff,
 the
 president
 of
 RCA.
 
  PHILO
 (to
 SARNOFF).
  Are
 you
 kidding
 me
 with
 this
 shit?
 
  SARNOFF.
  You’re
 imagining
 it.
 
  PHILO.
  They’re
 sitting
 right
 here!
 
  HARLAN.
  Philo?
 
  SARNOFF.
  They
 were
 there
 once,
 they
 never
 came
 back.
 
  PHILO.
  You
 think
 I’m
 delusional?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Kenny
 died.
 They
 cut
 his
 throat
 open
 and
 he
 died.
 You
 were
 half
 outta
 your
 mind.
 (beat)
  They
 girls
 were
 there
 once.
 
  PHILO
 (to
 CLIFF,
 HARLAN
 and
 STAN).
  I
 need
 to
 talk
 to
 you
 guys.
 
  HARLAN.
  I
 didn’t
 know
 they
 were
 from
 RCA,
 should
 we
 ask
 ‘em
 up
 to
 the
 lab?
 
  PHILO.
  Let’s
 not.
 
  STAN.
  Why?
 
 


  103
  PHILO.
  Well
 for
 one
 thing
 I’m
 not
 sure
 anymore
 that
 they’re
 really
 there,
 but
 that’s
 beside
 the
  point.
 
  CLIFF.
  What’s
 goin’
 on,
 Philo?
 
  PHILO.
  Vladimir
 Zworykin
 has
 taken
 Cliff’s
 tube
 and
 combined
 it
 with
 something
 he’s
 got
 to
  produce
 what’s
 apparently
 a
 very
 clear
 picture
 using
 thousand
 watt
 light.
 He’s
 claiming
 it’s
  a
 modification
 of
 his
 1923
 design
 and
 asking
 a
 judge
 to
 grant
 him
 the
 patent
 on
 television.
  So
 we’re
 suing
 him.
 
  HARLAN.
  What?
 
  PHILO.
  Yeah,
 things
 have
 taken
 a
 turn,
 but
 you
 really
 gotta
 ask
 yourself.
 
  CLIFF.
  What?
 
  PHILO.
  How
 the
 hell
 did
 he
 fix
 it?
 
 
  II.
 13
 Church.
 Steps
 outside.
 
  MAN
 (speaking
 to
 SARNOFFf).
  He
 was
 a
 businessman.
 
  PHILO
 (to
 audience).
  A
 memorial
 service
 was
 held
 at
 St.
 Patrick’s
 Cathedral
 on
 Fifth
 Avenue
 for
 Thomas
 Edison.
 
  MAN
 (to
 SARNOFF).
  He
 was
 a
 businessman
 and
 I’ll
 tell
 you
 why.
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 don’t
 need
 you
 to
 tell
 me
 why.
 
  MAN.
  He
 saw
 that
 electrical
 lines
 were
 an
 eyesore.
 So
 he
 said
 to
 the
 city,
 I
 will
 form
 a
 company
  and
 you
 will
 pay
 us
 to
 put
 the
 lines
 underground.
 Consolidated
 Edison.
 You
 see
 how
 he
 got
  paid
 twice?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Maybe
 you
 want
 to
 stop
 talking.
 
 
 


  104
  MAN.
  I’m
 sayin’—
 
  SARNOFF.
  His
 widow
 is
 walking
 over
 here.
 
  MINA
 EDISON
 has
 made
 her
 way
 over.
 
  MINA.
  David.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Mina.
 
  MINA.
  This
 is
 a
 wonderful
 turnout.
 Thank
 you.
 
  SARNOFF.
  This
 is
 all
 for
 Tom.
 
  MINA.
  There’s
 someone
 I
 want
 you
 to
 meet.
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 wanted
 to
 let
 you
 know
 that
 the
 lights
 in
 Rockefeller
 Center
 will
 go
 dim
 for
 two
 minutes
  tonight.
 
  MINA.
  That’s
 very
 nice,
 David.
 Thank
 you.
 (calling)
 Pem!
 
  PEM
 has
 come
 over
 from
 the
 group
 of
 mourners.
 She
 and
 SARNOFF
 immediately
 know
 who
  the
 other
 is.
 
  MINA.
  Pem,
 this
 is
 David
 Sarnoff.
 David,
 this
 is
 Pem
 Farnsworth,
 the
 wife
 of
 Tom’s
 young
 friend
 in
  San
 Francisco.
 
  SARNOFF.
  (beat)
 I’m
 pleased
 to
 meet
 you.
 
  PEM.
  Yes.
 
  MINA.
  I’m
 sorry,
 what
 time
 did
 you
 say
 the
 lights
 would—
 
  SARNOFF.
  At
 
 8
 PM.
 
 


  105
  MINA.
  I
 should
 join
 the
 kids.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Sure.
 
  MINA
 exits.
 
  SARNOFF.
  (beat)
 I
 understand
 your
 son
 died
 recently.
 
  PEM.
  Yes.
 
  SARNOFF.
  I’m
 sorry.
 Was
 it
 sudden?
 
  PEM.
  Yes.
 
  SARNOFF.
  How
 is
 your
 husband
 holding
 up?
 Something
 like
 this—
 
  PEM.
  I
 certainly
 hope
 you’re
 not
 trying
 to
 make
 a
 point
 about
 his
 mental
 health.
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 wasn’t.
 
  PEM.
  He
 couldn’t
 be
 here,
 he
 had
 to
 stay
 in
 San
 Francisco.
 
  SARNOFF.
  For
 the
 depositions.
 
  PEM.
  They
 seem
 to
 be
 asking
 him
 a
 lot
 of
 questions
 about
 the
 level
 of
 formal
 education
 he’s
 had.
 I
  assume
 your
 lawyers
 are
 preparing
 to
 argue
 that
 someone
 from
 Indian
 Creek
 with
 a
 year
 at
  BYU
 wouldn’t
 be
 able
 to—
 
  SARNOFF.
  I’m
 sure
 the
 lawyers
 would
 prefer
 we
 didn’t
 discuss
 this.
 
  PEM.
  May
 I
 ask
 you
 something
 before
 we
 go
 in?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Yes.
 
 


  106
  PEM.
  The
 Ford
 Motor
 Company
 had
 a
 problem
 with
 people
 stealing
 their
 customer’s
 cars
 right
  off
 the
 street
 and
 they
 held
 a
 contest
 in
 Science
 and
 Invention
 Magazine
 to
 see
 who
 could
  come
 up
 with
 the
 best
 solution.
 Philo
 wrote
 in
 that
 you
 could
 magnetize
 the
 starting
  mechanism
 near
 the
 steering
 column
 and
 if
 you
 magnetized
 a
 key
 in
 the
 exact
 same
 way,
  then
 only
 that
 key
 would
 start
 that
 car-­‐-­‐and
 he
 won
 the
 contest.
 My
 husband
 invented
 the
  ignition
 lock.
 Which
 may
 not
 sound
 like
 much
 except
 he
 was
 12
 years
 old
 at
 the
 time.
 Mr.
  Sarnoff,
 what
 were
 you
 doing
 when
 you
 were
 12?
 
 
 
  II.
 14
 
 Lippincott’s
 Office
 
  LIPPINCOTT
 is
 reading
 to
 CLIFF,
 STAN,
 and
 HARLAN.
 PHILO
 is
 detached,
 looking
 through
  piles
 of
 papers.
 
  LIPPINCOTT.
  Here’s
 Herbert
 Hoover
 talking
 about
 television.
 Sarnoff
 got
 Jim
 Harbord
 to
 plant
 the
 piece
  in
 a
 newspaper.
 (reading)
  “This
 invention
 again
 emphasizes
 a
 new
 era
 in
 the
 approach
 to
 scientific
 discovery.
 It
 is
 the
  result
 of
 organized,
 planned
 and
 definitely
 directed
 scientific
 research,
 magnificently
  coordinated
 in
 a
 cumulative
 group
 of
 highly
 skilled
 scientists.”
 
  STAN.
  So
 we
 know
 he’s
 not
 talking
 about
 us.
 
  HARLAN.
  No.
 
  LIPPINCOTT
 (still
 reading).
  “—a
 cumulative
 group
 of
 highly
 skilled
 scientists,
 loyally
 supported
 by
 a
 great
 corporation
  devoted
 to
 the
 advancement
 of
 the
 art.
 The
 intricate
 process
 of
 this
 invention”—bear
 in
  mind,
 he’s
 never
 seen
 one—“The
 intricate
 process
 of
 this
 invention
 could”—are
 you
  ready—“never
 have
 been
 developed
 under
 any
 conditions
 of
 isolated
 effort.”
 This
 is
 for
  anyone
 who
 still
 thinks
 I’m
 paranoid.
 Philo,
 are
 you
 listening?
 
  PHILO.
  Am
 I
 what?
 No,
 sorry.
 Herbert
 Hoover
 is
 devoted
 to
 the
 arts
 how?
 
  Lippincott’s
 SECRETARY
 steps
 in.
 
  SECRETARY.
  Mr.
 Lippincott?
 
  LIPPINCOTT
 (to
 PHILO).
  What
 are
 you
 doing?
 
  PHILO.
  Somewhere
 in
 here,
 he
 has
 to
 have
 described
 something
 that
 he’s
 doing
 differently.
 Cliff,
  you’re
 looking
 at
 the
 aperture?
 


  107
 
  CLIFF.
  Yeah.
 
  LIPPINCOTT.
  Phil,
 I
 need
 your
 head
 in
 this.
 
  SECRETARY.
  Sir,
 there’s
 a
 man
 who
 says
 he
 knows
 Mr.
 Farnsworth
 and
 can
 help.
 
  LIPPINCOTT.
  What’s
 his
 name?
 
  SECRETARY.
  Justin
 Tillman?
 
  LIPPINCOTT.
  Philo,
 you
 know
 anyone
 named
 Tillman?
 
  PHILO.
  No.
 
  LIPPINCOTT.
  Lemme
 see
 what
 he
 wants.
 
  LIPPINCOTT
 and
 the
 SECRETARY
 leave.
 
  CLIFF.
  The
 coating?
 There’s
 something
 with
 the
 photoelectric
 coating?
 He’s
 got
 magic
  photoelectric
 coating?
 
  HARLAN.
  Is
 it
 possible
 it’s
 effected
 by
 humidity
 or
 atmospheric
 pressure
 or
 barometric
 pressure?
 
  STAN.
  You
 think
 we
 haven’t
 gotten
 a
 clear
 picture
 because
 the
 weather
 hasn’t
 been
 good
 enough?
 
  HARLAN.
  You’re
 right.
 Let’s
 revisit
 Cliff’s
 theory
 that
 he
 has
 magic
 photoelectric
 material.
 
  LIPPINCOTT
 enters
 with
 JUSTIN
 TOLMAN.
 
  LIPPINCOTT.
  Philo?
 
  TOLMAN.
  Philo,
 do
 you
 remember
 who
 I
 am?
 
 
 


  108
  PHILO.
  Mr.
 Tolman?
 
  LIPPINCOTT.
  So
 you
 do
 know
 each
 other?
 
  TOLMAN.
  I
 taught
 Philo
 Basic
 Science
 in
 high
 school.
 
  HARLAN.
  Wow.
 (beat)
 Who
 taught
 you?
 
  PHILO.
  Mr.
 Tolman,
 what
 are
 you
 doing
 here?
 
  TOLMAN.
  My
 wife
 and
 I
 moved
 here
 last
 year.
 I
 read
 about
 this
 in
 the
 local
 paper.
 I’m
 not
 sure
 if
 this’ll
  mean
 anything,
 but
 I
 thought
 maybe
 you
 could
 use
 it.
 
  TOLMAN
 has
 taken
 out
 a
 science
 textbook.
 He
 opens
 it
 to
 a
 certain
 page
 and
 takes
 out
 a
  folded
 piece
 of
 paper
 and
 unfolds
 it
 on
 the
 desk.
 
  TOLMAN.
  You
 drew
 this
 for
 me.
 First
 week
 of
 September,
 1921.
 
  HARLAN.
  Look
 at
 that.
 
  STAN.
  Shit.
 
  HARLAN.
  Look
 at
 that.
 
  STAN.
  It’s
 the
 image
 dissector.
 
  CLIFF.
  There’s
 the
 seal.
 
  HARLAN.
  Yeah.
 
  LIPPINCOTT.
  Did
 you
 say
 1921?
 
  TOLMAN.
  First
 week
 of
 September.
 
 


  109
  LIPPINCOTT.
  Mr.
 Tolman,
 would
 you
 give
 a
 deposition
 in
 this
 matter?
 
  TOMAN.
  Yes
 sir.
 
 
  II.
 15
 
 
  Space
 begins
 to
 fill
 with
 witnesses
 being
 deposed,
 then
 becomes
 a
 Conference
 Room
 where
  depositions
 are
 being
 taken.
 
  STENOGRAPHER.
  Would
 you
 state
 your
 full
 name,
 please?
 
  TOLMAN.
  Justin
 Tolman.
 
  1.
  Charles
 Strauss.
 
  2.
  Ernst
 Alexanderson.
 
  WACHTEL.
  Edward
 Wachtel.
 
  3.
  I
 have
 Bachelors
 and
 Masters
 degrees
 from
 the
 Massachusetts
 Institute
 of
 Technology
 in
  Mechanical
 Engineering—
 
  4.
  A
 Ph.D.
 in
 Electrical
 Engineering—
 
  5.
  My
 Ph.D
 is
 in
 Chemistry—
 
  2.
  -­‐-­‐the
 faculty
 of
 the
 Rensselaer
 Polytechnic
 Institute—
 
  6.
  -­‐-­‐the
 Princeton
 Institute
 of
 Advanced
 Studies—
 
  4.
  -­‐-­‐at
 the
 United
 States
 Naval
 Academy
 at
 Annapolis,
 Maryland.
 
  SARNOFF
 (to
 audience).
  And
 for
 the
 visiting
 team?
 
 


  110
  STAN.
  I
 left
 Cal
 Tech
 after
 my
 junior
 year
 to
 work
 for
 Mr.
 Farnsworth.
 
  TOLMAN.
  I
 taught
 him
 high
 school
 science
 in
 Rigby,
 Idaho.
 
  AGNES.
  He’s
 my
 brother.
 
  CLIFF.
  He’s
 married
 to
 my
 sister.
 
  STENOGRAPHER.
  Would
 you
 state
 your
 full
 name,
 please.
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  Vladimir
 Kosma
 Zworykin.
 Z-­‐W-­‐O-­‐R-­‐Y-­‐K-­‐I-­‐N
 
  LAWYER.
  Mr.
 Zworykin,
 did
 you
 make
 a
 patent
 application
 in
 1923?
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  Yes.
 
  LAWYER.
  Would
 you
 describe
 your
 invention?
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  The
 system
 disclosed
 by
 my
 application
 utilizes
 a
 cathode
 ray
 tube
 as
 the
 element
 for
  translating
 the
 optical
 image
 into
 the
 electrical
 wave
 train
 of—
 
  SARNOFF.
  Now
 something
 incredible
 is
 about
 to
 happen
 and
 these
 lawyers
 are
 thoroughly
  unprepared
 for
 it.
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  …so
 as
 to
 reconstruct
 there
 an
 electro-­‐optical
 representation
 of
 the
 impressed
 or
 in-­‐falling
  optical
 image.
 
  LAWYER.
  In
 the
 11
 years
 since
 that
 application
 have
 you
 made
 any
 modifications?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Hang
 on.
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  Yes
 
 
 


  111
  LAWYER.
  Would
 you
 name
 one
 of
 those
 modifications?
 
  PHILO
 (suddenly
 and
 right
 to
 ZWORYKIN.).
  You
 store
 the
 light.
 
  SARNOFF.
  He
 just
 saw
 it.
 
  LIPPINCOTT.
  Philo—
 
  PHILO.
  You
 store
 the
 light.
 
  LAWYER.
  Mr.
 Lippincott,
 your
 client
 can’t—
 
  PHILO.
  In
 place
 of
 the
 usual
 fluorescent
 end
 wall—
 
  LIPPINCOTT.
  Philo!
 
  PHILO.
  -­‐-­‐portion
 of
 the
 tube,
 Zworykin
 replaces
 this
 structure
 with
 a
 new
 type
 of
 composite
 or
  mosaic
 electrode—
 
  LIPPINCOTT.
  You’re
 speaking
 out
 loud!
 
  PHILO.
  You
 stored
 the
 light!
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  Yes!
 
  SARNOFF.
  Vladmir
 jumps
 in.
 
  LAWYER.
  Gentlemen—
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  You
 were
 using
 continuous
 potassium
 coating—
 
  LAWYER.
  Mr.
 Zworykin—
 
 


  112
  ZWORYKIN.
  I
 used
 droplets.
 
  PHILO.
  I’m
 seeing
 that!
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  -­‐-­‐or
 globules,
 you
 see?
 The
 mosaic.
 
  PHILO.
  And
 the
 different
 elemental
 areas
 stored
 the
 light.
 
  ZWORYKIN.
  Yes.
 
  LIPPINCOTT.
  Gentlemen!
 
  PHILO.
  You
 did
 it!
 You
 found
 it!
 
  LIPPINCOTT.
  I’d
 like
 to
 take
 a
 five
 minute
 break
 now.
 
  LAWYER.
  Yeah,
 me
 too.
 
  SARNOFF.
  The
 lawyers
 were
 also
 unable
 to
 recognize
 signs
 of
 a
 nervous
 breakdown.
 
  PHILO.
  Hey
 come
 on.
 Fellas.
 I
 mean
 whichever
 way
 this
 ends
 up
 going…I
 mean,
 it’s
 done.
 It’s
 done.
  We
 have
 television
 now.
 
  JUDGE
 enters
 and
 puts
 a
 heavy
 book
 down
 along
 with
 a
 pile
 of
 briefs
 and
 makes
 a
 few
  administrative
 notations
 during
 the
 following.
 
  SARNOFF.
  There
 was
 no
 formality
 or
 gravity
 to
 the
 judge’s
 decision.
 I
 don’t
 even
 know
 if
 he
 was
  wearing
 a
 robe
 when
 he
 read
 it.
 It
 was
 one
 of
 three
 or
 four
 dozen
 pieces
 of
 business
 before
  the
 Court
 that
 morning,
 most
 of
 them
 having
 to
 do
 with
 a
 new
 design
 for
 a
 toaster.
 
  JUDGE.
  You
 can
 sit,
 this’ll
 just
 take
 a
 second.
 The
 Court’s
 reviewed
 the
 briefs
 submitted
 by
 the
  parties
 and
 is
 ready
 to
 rule.
 The
 only
 question
 in
 controversy
 is
 whether
 the
 optical
 Pyrex
  seal
 at
 the
 end
 of
 the
 cathode
 tube
 constitutes
 new
 matter
 in
 Zworykin’s
 1923
 application.
 I
  find
 that
 it
 does
 not
 and
 that
 it
 does
 in
 fact—
 
 
 


  113
  CLIFF.
  You
 gotta
 be
 kidding
 me!
 
  HARLAN.
  Ah!
 
  CROCKER.
  No!
 
  JUDGE.
  Excuse
 me.
 (beat)
 And
 that
 it
 does
 in
 fact
 fall
 within
 the
 generic
 claims
 made
 in
 that
 
  application.
 A
 decree
 will
 be
 entered
 awarding
 priority
 of
 invention
 to
 Vladimir
 Zworykin
  and
 authorizing
 the
 Commissioner
 of
 Patents
 to
 approve
 the
 original
 1923
 application.
 This
  matter
 is
 adjourned.
 
 
  II.
 16
 
  SARNOFF
 (to
 audience).
  I
 may
 be
 wrong,
 Farnsworth
 may
 have
 won
 that
 first
 one
 and
 lost
 on
 appeal.
 Or
 lost
 and
  then
 won
 and
 lost
 again,
 I
 don’t
 know,
 it
 went
 on
 for
 a
 long
 time—the
 law
 suits
 and
  counter-­‐suits
 and
 appeals.
 It
 didn’t
 matter,
 all
 I
 needed
 to
 do
 was
 run
 down
 the
 clock
 on
 his
  17
 years
 and
 that
 was
 easy
 ‘cause
 by
 this
 time
 we
 were
 getting
 ready
 for
 war
 and
  everybody’s
 resources
 were
 being
 directed
 toward
 developing
 an
 instrument
 based
 on
 the
  idea
 that
 targets
 reflect
 radio
 signals
 and
 create
 an
 echo.
 Radio
 Detection
 and
 Ranging,
 it
  was
 called,
 or
 radar
 for
 short.
 The
 lawyers
 and
 the
 investors
 and
 the
 friends
 had
 left,
 and
  then
 Farnsworth
 and
 Zworykin
 exchanged
 a
 few
 words
 before
 Zworykin
 slipped
 out
 the
  side
 door
 and
 Farnsworth
 and
 I
 were
 left
 alone.
 
  PHILO
 has
 turned
 around
 and
 sees
 SARNOFF
 on
 the
 other
 side
 of
 the
 space.
 
  SARNOFF.
  I’m
 David
 Sarnoff.
 
  PHILO.
  I’m
 Philo
 Farnsworth.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Sure.
 
  PHILO.
  You
 come
 all
 the
 way
 down
 from
 New
 York?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Sure.
 (beat)
 What
 did
 you
 say
 to
 Zworykin?
 
  PHILO.
  Hmm?
 
 


  114
  SARNOFF.
  For
 posterity’s
 sake.
 Did
 you
 tell
 him
 to
 fuck
 off?
 
  PHILO.
  No.
 I
 asked
 him
 how
 he
 fell
 on
 the
 mosaic
 pattern
 for
 light
 storage.
 
  SARNOFF.
  How
 did
 he
 do
 it?
 
  PHILO.
  A
 lab
 assistant
 left
 a
 tube
 in
 an
 oven
 too
 long
 and
 the
 silver
 boiled
 up
 into
 little
 pieces.
 You
  should
 find
 out
 the
 name
 of
 that
 lab
 assistant
 and
 write
 it
 down
 somewhere.
 He
 and
 my
  brother-­‐in-­‐law
 built
 the
 first
 television.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Listen,
 I’m
 sure
 your
 lawyer
 has
 told
 you
 that
 this
 decision
 has
 no
 legal
 effect
 on
 your
  patent,
 just
 ours.
 
  PHILO.
  Is
 that
 right?
 
  SARNOFF.
  No,
 I
 mean
 it.
 
  PHILO.
  You
 ever
 hear
 of
 Elisha
 Gray?
 
  SARNOFF.
  No.
 
  PHILO.
  He
 invented
 the
 telephone.
 And
 then
 showed
 up
 at
 the
 patent
 office
 exactly
 120
 minutes
  after
 Alexander
 Graham
 Bell.
 
  SARNOFF.
  This
 isn’t
 like
 that.
 You’re
 free
 to
 license
 your
 patent
 and
 so
 are
 we.
 
  PHILO.
  And
 in
 a
 side-­‐by-­‐side
 comparison
 between
 RCA
 and
 The
 Farnsworth
 Television
 Company,
  where
 do
 you
 suppose
 the
 manufacturers
 are
 gonna
 go?
 I
 just
 lost
 other
 people’s
 money,
 I
  just
 lost
 television
 and
 I
 won’t
 lie
 to
 you,
 Mr.
 Sarnoff,
 the
 billion
 dollars
 I’m
 not
 gonna
 get
  might
 have
 come
 in
 handy.
 So
 don’t
 patronize
 me.
 
  SARNOFF.
  How
 did
 your
 son
 die?
 
  PHILO.
  What?
 
 


  115
  SARNOFF.
  I’m
 sorry,
 how
 did
 your
 son
 die?
 
  PHILO.
  He
 died
 of
 strep
 throat.
 
  SARNOFF.
  What
 are
 you
 gonna
 do
 now?
 
  PHILO.
  I
 have
 to
 call
 my
 wife
 and
 apologize
 for
 wasting
 her
 time.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Come
 to
 work
 for
 RCA.
 We
 have
 a
 lab
 in
 Camden,
 a
 lab
 in
 Schenectady.
 You
 move
 your
  family
 there,
 you’re
 put
 on
 salary.
 
  PHILO.
  I
 appreciate
 it
 but
 no
 thank
 you.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Why?
 
  PHILO.
  I
 don’t
 want
 to
 be
 told
 what
 to
 invent
 and
 once
 I
 invent
 it
 I
 don’t
 want
 someone
 else
 owning
  it.
 
  SARNOFF.
  So
 what
 are
 you
 gonna
 do?
 
  PHILO.
  Well,
 people
 are
 staring
 to
 talk
 about
 fusion.
 
  SARNOFF.
  I’m
 sorry?
 
  PHILO.
  Fusion.
 
  SARNOFF.
  What
 is
 it?
 
  PHILO.
  What
 powers
 the
 rest
 of
 the
 universe.
 The
 sun
 gets
 its
 energy
 from
 hydrogen
 particles
  crashing
 into
 each
 other
 at
 hellacious
 speeds.
 Now,
 if
 we
 could
 re-­‐create
 that
 in
 a
 controlled
  environment
 then
 theoretically
 all
 the
 energy
 you
 need
 to
 run
 the
 world
 you
 could
 find
 in
  this
 pen.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Where
 are
 you
 gonna
 get
 the
 hydrogen?
 


  116
 
  PHILO.
  The
 whole
 place
 is
 made
 out
 of
 hydrogen.
 
  SARNOFF.
  You’re
 saying
 we’re
 not
 gonna
 use
 petroleum?
 
  PHILO.
  A
 gallon
 of
 water
 has
 300
 times
 as
 much
 energy
 as
 a
 gallon
 of
 gasoline.
 It
 doesn’t
 cost
  anything
 and
 you’re
 never
 gonna
 run
 out.
 
  SARNOFF.
  You’re
 crazy.
 
  PHILO.
  I
 heard
 that
 a
 lot
 when
 I
 suggested
 we
 could
 transmit
 pictures
 electronically,
 which
 was
  1921
 by
 the
 way
 and
 there
 was
 no
 reason
 for
 your
 people
 to
 humiliate
 Justin
 Tolman
 like
  that.
 
  SARNOFF.
  He
 was
 an
 old
 man
 with
 a
 crumpled
 piece
 of
 paper
 who’d
 forgotten
 a
 lot
 things,
 including
  his
 home
 address.
 You
 sued
 me.
 
  PHILO.
  Why
 did
 Edwin
 Armstrong
 kill
 himself?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Don’t
 believe
 everything
 you
 hear.
 
  PHILO.
  The
 guy
 comes
 up
 with
 frequency
 modulation,
 then
 jumps
 off
 the
 top
 of
 a
 radio
 tower.
 
  SARNOFF.
  The
 same
 thing
 killed
 Armstrong
 as
 killed
 you.
 
  PHILO.
  You?
 
  SARNOFF.
  No,
 but
 that’s
 a
 good
 guess.
 Alcoholism.
 
  PHILO.
  Maybe.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Maybe?
 
 
 
 


  117
  PHILO.
  I
 know
 for
 sure
 that
 vomiting-­‐on-­‐my-­‐shoes
 drunk
 I’m
 a
 better
 engineer
 that
 anyone
 you’ve
  got
 sober.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Like
 I
 don’t
 know
 that.
 Listen,
 you’re
 not
 pissed
 off
 at
 me,
 you’re
 pissed
 off
 ‘cause
 no
 one
 in
  your
 lab
 left
 a
 tube
 in
 the
 oven
 too
 long.
 You
 never
 got
 it
 right.
 
  PHILO.
  It
 was
 a
 hard
 problem.
 
  SARNOFF.
  How
 hard?
 
  PHILO.
  Zworykin
 never
 got
 it
 at
 all
 and
 if
 it
 weren’t
 for
 me
 he’d
 still
 be
 spinning
 a
 pin
 wheel
 right
  now.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Zworykin’s
 a
 hack,
 he’s
 second
 string,
 he’s
 your
 understudy.
 You
 gave
 it
 away.
 
  PHILO.
  You’re
 talking
 to
 me
 about
 giving
 it
 away?
 
  SARNOFF.
  If
 you’d
 a
 been
 smart—or
 sober—
 
  PHILO.
  “…the
 opportunity
 to
 lift
 ourselves
 intellectually,
 culturally,
 spiritually,
 economically.”
 
  SARNOFF.
  You’re
 a
 fan
 of
 my
 speeches.
 
  PHILO.
  “Radio
 should
 be
 run
 like
 a
 public
 library.
 Like
 a
 library.”
 Whatever
 happened
 to
 no
 paid
  advertising
 during
 informational
 programming?
 You’re
 talking
 to
 me
 about
 giving
 it
 away?
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 didn’t
 have
 a
 choice.
 
  PHILO.
  You’re
 the
 president
 of
 RCA
 and
 the
 founder
 of
 the
 National
 Broadcasting
 Company,
 you
  had
 a
 variety
 of
 choices.
 
  SARNOFF.
  No
 I
 didn’t.
 
 
 
 


  118
  PHILO.
  We
 both
 blew
 it
 huge,
 but
 the
 difference
 is,
 I
 didn’t
 know
 the
 answer
 to
 my
 light
 dissipation
  problem.
 You
 knew
 that
 once
 there
 was
 a
 financial
 incentive
 for
 a
 news
 broadcast
 to
 be
  popular
 it
 would
 be
 making
 a
 mockery
 out
 of
 both
 of
 our
 lives,
 to
 say
 nothing
 of
 a
 society
  being
 informed
 enough
 to
 participate
 in
 its
 own
 democracy.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Yes.
 
  PHILO.
  Yes?
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 made
 one
 single
 miscalculation
 in
 my
 life
 and
 that
 was
 that
 I
 had
 no
 idea
 how
 successful
  the
 thing
 was
 gonna
 be
 at
 delivering
 consumers
 to
 advertisers.
 And
 my
 friend,
 once
 you’re
  good
 at
 that
 you’re
 gonna
 hard
 a
 hard
 time
 being
 good
 at
 anything
 else.
 
  PHILO.
  Really?
 
  SARNOFF.
  Yeah.
 
  PHILO.
  How
 hard?
 (pause)
 You
 said
 ‘go
 fuck
 yourself’
 to
 a
 Russian
 soldier
 when
 you
 were
 10
 but
  you
 couldn’t
 say
 no
 to
 advertising
 dollars?
 You
 tried
 really
 hard
 but
 you
 couldn’t?
 
 
  SARNOFF
 (after
 a
 beat).
  If
 you
 had
 it
 to
 do
 over,
 would
 you
 have
 cashed
 out
 early
 and
 sold
 me
 the
 patent?
 
  PHILO.
  If
 I
 had
 it
 to
 do
 over
 I’d
 discover
 an
 antibiotic
 for
 strep
 throat.
 
  SARNOFF.
  (beat)
 Come
 work
 for
 RCA.
 
  PHILO.
  Did
 you
 come
 down
 here
 to
 offer
 me
 a
 job?
 
  SARNOFF.
  No.
 (beat)
 No
 I
 didn’t.
 I
 came
 down
 here
 to
 tell
 you
 that
 I
 think
 your
 invention
 is
  extraordinary.
 I
 wanted
 to
 tell
 you
 that
 and
 to
 say
 that
 it’s
 my
 intention
 to
 be
 a
 worthy
  custodian.
 
  PHILO.
  (beat)
 Good
 luck.
 
  PHILO
 extends
 his
 hand.
 SARNOFF
 shakes
 it.
  Then
 PHILO
 exits.
 


  119
 
  Epilogue
 
  SARNOFF.
  I
 never
 met
 Philo
 Farnsworth,
 I
 just
 made
 that
 last
 scene
 up.
 I
 wish
 I’d—I
 should’ve
 met
  with
 him,
 I
 couldn’t.
 I’d
 attract
 attention
 if
 I’d
 met
 with
 him—or
 if
 I’d
 offered
 him
 a
 job—it
  doesn’t
 matter.
 By
 and
 large
 that
 was
 the
 last
 anyone
 heard
 from
 him.
 He
 was
 hospitalized
  in
 1949
 for
 depression.
 He’d
 live
 another
 25
 years
 after
 that,
 but
 he
 died
 broke
 and
 in
  obscurity.
 
  (pause)
 
  Pete
 Conrad
 was
 the
 third
 man
 on
 the
 moon.
 And
 when
 he
 stepped
 off
 the
 LEM,
 he
 radioed
  back
 what
 you’d
 expect,
 the
 usual…”Houston,
 Tranquility
 Base,
 Such
 and
 such
 is
  operational”
 and
 so
 on
 and
 then
 he
 stops.
 And
 he
 looks
 around
 and
 he
 feels
 what’s
 under
  his
 feet
 and
 in
 an
 entirely
 different
 voice
 says,
 “My
 God.
 We
 were
 meant
 to
 be
 explorers.”
 
  (pause)
 
  Then
 a
 moment
 later
 he
 said,
 “And
 good
 luck,
 Mr.
 Fitzhugh.”
 I
 got
 a
 chance
 to
 meet
 Conrad
  later
 and
 I
 asked
 him
 what
 did
 you
 mean
 when
 you
 said,
 “Good
 luck,
 Mr.
 Fitzhugh”?
  Apparently
 the
 Fitzhughs
 were
 his
 neighbors
 growing
 up
 and
 one
 night
 he
 heard
 them
  fighting
 and
 Mrs.
 Fitzhugh
 shouted,
 “Oral
 sex?!
 You’ll
 get
 oral
 sex
 when
 that
 kid
 next
 door
  walks
 on
 the
 moon!”
 
  (beat)
 
  I
 don’t
 understand
 people
 who
 say
 what
 business
 do
 we
 have
 going
 to
 the
 moon
 when
  people
 around
 the
 world
 are
 starving.
 First
 of
 all,
 people
 aren’t
 starving
 because
 we
 went
  to
 the
 moon,
 one
 doesn’t
 have
 much
 to
 do
 with
 the
 other.
 But
 you
 go
 to
 the
 moon
 ‘cause
 it’s
  next.
 We
 came
 out
 of
 the
 cave,
 went
 over
 the
 hill,
 crossed
 the
 ocean,
 pioneered
 a
 continent
  and
 took
 to
 the
 heavens.
 We
 were
 meant
 to
 be
 explorers.
 Explorers,
 builders
 and
  protectors.
 I
 don’t
 think
 I
 stole
 television—if
 I
 did,
 I
 did
 it
 fair
 and
 square.
 But
 he
 deserved
  better
 in
 my
 hands.
 He
 was
 gonna
 do
 a
 lot
 more,
 but
 I
 burned
 his
 house
 down
 so
 he
  wouldn’t
 burn
 mine
 down
 first.
 
  (beat)
 
  That’s
 all,
 except
 for
 this.
 Every
 once
 in
 a
 while
 I
 have
 a
 very
 romantic
 vision.
 
 
  A
 Bar
 
  The
 place
 is
 full
 and
 everyone
 is
 facing
 downstage,
 watching
 a
 television
 that’s
 mounted
 up
 in
  the
 corner.
 We
 hear
 the
 commentary.)
 
  VOICE
 OVER.
  We’ve
 passed
 the
 60
 second
 mark,
 power
 transfer
 is
 complete.
 
 


  120
  SARNOFF.
  It’s
 July
 16,
 1969,
 at
 9:30
 am.
 A
 bar
 is
 filled
 with
 the
 kinds
 of
 people
 who
 are
 in
 bars
 at
 9:30
  am.
 
  VOICE
 OVER.
  We’re
 on
 internal
 power
 with
 the
 launch
 vehicle
 at
 this
 time.
 
  SARNOFF.
  And
 down
 at
 the
 end
 of
 the
 bar
 is
 a
 guy
 with
 a
 Bushmills
 on
 the
 rocks.
 In
 front
 of
 him
 are
 a
  half-­‐dozen
 cocktail
 napkins
 with
 ungodly
 diagrams
 scrawled
 all
 over
 them.
 
  VOICE
 OVER.
  All
 the
 second
 stage
 tanks
 now
 are
 pressurized.
 30
 seconds
 and
 counting,
 we
 are
 still
 go
 with
  Apollo
 11.
 
  SARNOFF.
  No
 one
 in
 the
 bar
 would
 be
 able
 to
 recognize
 it,
 but
 what
 he’s
 drawn
 is
 a
 diagram
 of
 a
  controlled
 hydrogen
 generator.
 Fusion.
 
  VOICE
 OVER.
  T-­‐minus
 25
 seconds.
 
  BAR
 PATRON.
  Here
 they
 go.
 
  VOICE
 OVER.
  T-­‐minus
 20
 seconds
 and
 counting.
 
  SARNOFF.
  And
 he
 hasn’t
 lost
 his
 spirit,
 I
 haven’t
 killed
 him.
 And
 he
 looks
 up
 at
 the
 television
 and
 he
  says—
 
  PHILO.
  Godspeed
 fellas.
 
  VOICE
 OVER.
  T-­‐minus
 15
 seconds,
 guidance
 is
 internal.
 
  SARNOFF.
  Godspeed.
 
  VOICE
 OVER.
  We
 have
 liftoff
 in
 12,
 11,
 10,
 9—(ignition
 sequence
 starts)—6,
 5,
 4,
 3—
 
  BLACKOUT.
 
 
  END
 OF
 PLAY.
 
 

Sponsor Documents

Hide

Forgot your password?

Or register your new account on INBA.INFO

Hide

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link to create a new password.

Back to log-in

Close