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US Airways June 2014: Season of Celebration

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Concerts, festivals,
food, and eclectic
neighborhoods put
a special shine
on summer in
Philadelphia.
BY JOANN GRECO
Season of
Celebration
156 JUNE 2014 usairwaysmag.com 157 usairwaysmag.com JUNE 2014
Stops on this route of interwoven sites include
the Liberty Bell, Independence Hall, Benjamin
Franklin Museum, National Constitution Center,
and Christ Church. They stitch together that
fabled story as easily as Betsy Ross did the nation’s
first flag.
“Philadelphia’s enduring independent spirit
was established in the historic district,” says
Meryl Levitz, the president and CEO of VISIT
PHILADEPHIA
TM
. “Today, you find that revolu-
tionary quality all over the region.”
Beyond Philly’s historic heart, travelers gather
deeper insights into the city’s past and a rich un-
derstanding of this modern metropolitan area that
some four million people are proud to call home.
Start by exploring the neighborhoods within a
five-minute walk. To the north, Old City condos,
art galleries, and happening restaurants are lo-
cated in redeveloped Civil War–era factories. A
few blocks south, Society Hill features stately red
brick homes with Federal touches such as boot
scrapers, marble stoops, and wooden shutters.
Hot Fun in the City
To the east lies Penn’s Landing, a hub of summer
fun, including concerts, films, and, most notably,
fireworks and other events linked to Wawa Wel-
come America!, the city’s weeklong Independence
I
n summertime, the streets of
Philadelphia’s historic district
are crowded with visitors
looking to better understand
America’s beginnings.
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Clockwise from left: Philadelphia
skyline, Silk City, Morgan’s Pier, and
the O-bon Festival in Clark Park
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Top Chefs and Beer Halls
True foodies also know that some of the hippest
restaurants lie on the fringes of Center City,
just a 10-minute cab ride away. Along Passyunk
Avenue, Nicholas Elmi, America’s newest “top
chef,” has joined a stellar cadre of toque-wearers
who have established innovative kitchens, while
the culinary scenes of South Street West and
Fairmount continue to grow. All over town,
the beer garden concept is flourishing, from
Fishtown’s Frankford Hall to Bella Vista’s
Brauhaus Schmitz, from Brü to Drury Beer
Garden, both in Center City.

Artful Offerings
For the culturally inclined, the mile-long
Benjamin Franklin Parkway reigns. The roster
of museums includes the Barnes Foundation,
where Cézanne’s still lifes top the bill this sum-
mer; the Rodin Museum, with its unparalleled
sculptures and recently replenished gardens; the
just-expanded Franklin Institute; and The
Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University,
where the world’s exotic birds preen in the sum-
mer spotlight. At the top of the parkway, the
Philadelphia Museum of Art is showcasing the
work of Patrick Kelly, the Philly native who made
a huge splash in the fashion world of the ’80s.
Behind the Art Museum, Fairmount Park,
the nation’s largest urban swath of green, offers
treasures like Shofuso, a Japanese tea house and
garden, and Please Touch Museum, a children’s
attraction located in one of the few surviving
structures from the 1876 Centennial Exposition.

Abundant Countryside
If the park whets your appetite for more of the
great outdoors, venture farther — but convenient-
ly, no more than an hour’s drive. In Bucks County
to the north, you’ll discover New Hope, a charm-
ing artists’ enclave, and Doylestown, a county seat
alive with a trio of distinctive museums.
To the south, Chester County and the
Brandywine Valley lure with both Longwood
Gardens and the rolling landscapes made famous
by painter and Pennsylvania native Andrew Wyeth.
To the west, the towns of the Main Line offer some
of the area’s best-preserved history, such as Valley
Forge National Historical Park, and picturesque
draws, including Chanticleer, a former
private estate now known for its enchanting
botanical garden.
Day festival (July 1–7). Also on the Delaware
Riverfront is Race Street Pier, a park that offers
great activities (like morning yoga and cooling
breezes) and Morgan’s Pier, a summer favorite for
enjoying a frosty brew with a river view.
And to the west, head to University City’s out-
door oasis Clark Park in August for the annual
O-bon Festival, a free event honoring Japanese
traditions and culture.
Sometimes, summer in the city means seren-
dipitous surprises. For several years now, the
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society has trans-
formed a different empty lot into a site bursting
with blooms. This year, Penn’s Landing is getting
in on the pop-up action with Spruce Street Harbor,
complete with an urban beach, hammocks, and a
food-and-drink area on floating barges.
Vibrant Neighborhoods
Shopping and dining are great ways to explore
Philadelphia’s neighborhoods. Rittenhouse Square
remains shopping central for big-name brands
and luxurious goods. But elsewhere, the indepen-
dents shine. The east end of Pine Street offers gift
shops and eclectic boutiques, while the blocks of
Midtown Village feature a variety of restaurants
and shopping treasures. Meanwhile, the warehouses
and studios of the Loft District, Old City, Northern
Liberties, and Fishtown are home to the city’s
maker, crafts, and artist communities.
158 JUNE 2014 usairwaysmag.com
The streets in
neighborhoods
like Old City
bustle well into
the evening.
VISIT
PHILADELPHIA
TM
800.537.7676
visitphilly.com
Check out the next 38 pages to see
what makes my region great.
visitphilly.com
My Phillyosophy:
I am never the same
place twice.
Photos by J. Fusco, R. Kennedy and J.S. Ruth for VISIT PHILADELPHIA
TM
visit philly toc.indd 1 5/5/14 4:20 PM
a Stage
160 JUNE 2014 usairwaysmag.com 161 usairwaysmag.com JUNE 2014
Opposite page, clockwise
from top: Curtis 20/21
Ensemble performs at
Carnegie Hall’s Zankel Hall;
Curtis Opera Theatre
performs Mozart’s Magic
Flute; Curtis Symphony
Orchestra opens the 2012
Dresden Music Festival;
faculty member Jonathan
Biss filming a free online
course; Curtis On Tour
ensemble sightseeing in
Beijing
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The global reach of the Curtis Institute of Music
All the World’s
But the Curtis Institute of Music does not rest
on its laurels — or stay within the confines of
Philadelphia.
Sure, it’s a local landmark, occupying
prime real estate on Rittenhouse Square, but
part of what has sealed the school’s reputation
is its dynamism and philosophy of “learning by
doing.” Its 168 students (who all receive full-
tuition scholarships) routinely offer Philadel-
phia residents some 200 free classical concerts
a year. And in recent years, they’ve made all
the world their stage.
Through Curtis On Tour, established in
2008, students, faculty, and alumni have trav-
F
or any institution of higher learning,
alumni that include Leonard Bernstein
and Samuel Barber and winners of
Guggenheim Fellowships and Pulitzer
Prizes would be achievement enough.
eled to 44 destinations in Europe, Asia, and
both North and South America. With each
performance, they’re increasingly in demand.
After opening the Dresden Music Festival in
2012 — a distinction usually reserved for the
likes of the Berlin Philharmonic or other es-
teemed world orchestras — reviewers couldn’t
rave enough: “Simply phenomenal,” was the
assessment of one; “a first-class orchestra” was
the description of another, with effusive com-
pliments to conductor Robert Spano, himself a
Curtis graduate. “They embody passion, preci-
sion, and, despite their youth, astonishing musi-
cal maturity,” said yet another.
Those who can’t make it to Dresden or any
of the other 44 destinations don’t have to worry.
Curtis has erased geographical boundaries by
embracing 21st century technology with gusto.
Its digital showcase is an online portal (curtis
.edu/digital) guiding music lovers to classes,
performances, downloads, and more. Thanks
to a partnership with Coursera, a leading pro-
vider of massive open online courses, some
68,000 students from 135 countries explored
the intricacies of Beethoven’s piano sonatas and
the history of Western music through perfor-
mance. And when school isn’t in session, you
can access clips from past lectures for free.
The same holds true for Curtis Performs, an
archive of performances of everything from
Mahler’s Symphony No. 5 to a chamber quartet
performing a selection by 20th century com-
poser Paul Hindemith. Similar to HD broad-
casts from the Metropolitan Opera, Curtis
Performs takes HD to another level, with ad-
vanced technology that allows the videos to be
viewed on any device — smartphone, tablet,
laptop, or desktop computer. Since its launch
in 2013, viewers from 148 different countries
have tuned in.
It’s an impressive record — especially for a
90-year-old. That’s right: In the fall, the Curtis
Institute will celebrate its founding in 1924 by
Mary Louise Curtis Bok, heiress to the Curtis
Publishing Company, which produced The
Saturday Evening Post and Ladies Home Jour-
nal. It was one of her artistic consultants, con-
ductor Leopold Stokowski, who glimpsed the
future, predicting that Curtis would “become
the most important musical institution of our
country, perhaps the world.”
And indeed it has.
Curtis Institute
of Music
1726 Locust Streets
Philadelphia, PA
215.893.7902
curtis.edu/USAirways
162 JUNE 2014 usairwaysmag.com 163 usairwaysmag.com JUNE 2014
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n the latter half of 2014, the
shining light at the end of the
Benjamin Franklin Parkway
promises several exciting
exhibitions.
They include a tantalizing first peek at the mu-
seum’s forthcoming renovation and expansion
plans designed by master architect Frank Gehry,
and an in-depth look at the pioneer modern
photographer Paul
Strand. Opening on
July 1 and continuing
through the summer,
Making A Classic
Modern: Frank Geh-
ry’s Plan for the Phila-
delphia Museum of
Art is curated by Tim-
othy Rub, the mu-
seum’s director and
chief executive officer.
It offers a behind-the-
will include many that are recent acquisitions.
On October 21, 2014–January 4, 2015, the
museum mounts an exhibition on the iconic
and iconoclastic Strand, an American whose
experiments at the turn of the 20th-century
helped establish photography as a major form.
Organized chronologically, Paul Strand:
Master of Modern Photography (Oct. 21–Jan. 4,
2015) draws from the museum’s archive of
more than 3,000 Strand prints to capture a
career that spanned six decades. About a dozen
works from Strand contemporaries — includ-
ing photographer Alfred Stieglitz and painters
Georgia O’Keeffe, Charles Sheeler, and Arthur
Dove — will also be displayed alongside Strand
artifacts, such as correspondence, cameras,
and scrapbooks.
Images from the peripatetic photographer’s
travels through the American Southwest,
Europe, Morocco, Egypt, and elsewhere are
a highlight.
And since Strand had a long-standing
interest in the idea of narrative, books, picture
groupings, and his avant-garde films are given a
stage, as are his wide-ranging experiments with
photographic prints.
The installation will be divided into three
broad sections that will illustrate Strand’s
development. It begins with a look at his
early modernist works, including abstraction,
landscapes, and moving portraits of anony-
mous subjects on the street. The next sequence
examines Strand’s time in the Southwest
and Mexico.
The final portion of the exhibition concen-
trates on a handful of projects representative
of Strand’s later life, including his return to
New York and his renewed interest in film, as
well as photographic suites he undertook
in New England; Luzzara, Italy; and Ghana.
Because context was so critical to Strand’s
work, this section will emphasize the historical,
social, political, and literary forces behind
these projects.
Philadelphia
Museum of Art
2600 Benjamin
Franklin Pkwy.
Philadelphia, PA
215.763.8100
philamuseum.org
The Philadelphia Museum of Art has some
big plans over the next six months. BY JOANN GRECO
New Landmark
Exhibitions
Clockwise from left: new
multipurpose space on the
museum’s second floor
with a dramatic city view;
Paul Strand’s The Family,
Luzzara (The Lusettis),
1953 (negative), mid to late
1960s) print; Paul Strand’s
White Fence, Port Kent,
New York, 1916 (negative),
1945 (print)
scenes look at the creative processes involved in
dramatically augmenting an already beloved
institution (it was designed between 1918 and
1928 in the Beaux Arts style by the firm of Hor-
ace Trumbauer and others). “We’re trying to
unlock the possibilities that are already in the
DNA of a great building,” Gehry has observed,
adding that what he’s really doing is “unclogging
the arteries.”
The master plan calls for interior renovations
and restorations to make the museum more
easily navigable and adds significantly more
space. In addition to new and enhanced
entrances and an auditorium, the project
delivers much-needed gallery space and exten-
sive garden features created by Olin, an interna-
tionally recognized landscape architecture firm
headquartered in Philadelphia. The exhibition
will include photographs, large-scale models,
site plans, and renderings that illuminate both
the museum’s history and overall vision of the
master plan. It will also showcase other Gehry
projects, as well as works representing the mu-
seum’s varied collections that will be greatly
affected by the project, including American art,
Asian art, and contemporary art. These works
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Roaming Philadelphia’s outdoor museum BY A. WHITE
From Robert Indiana’s LOVE sculpture to
Auguste Rodin’s The Thinker, Philadelphia
boasts one of the largest public art collections
in the nation.
“You can walk the length of the Parkway
and experience some of the most impressive
examples of public art in America,” says Execu-
tive Director Penny Balkin Bach.
The Benjamin Franklin Parkway is home to
the city’s top museums and outdoor sculptures,
including Alexander Stirling Calder’s Shake-
speare Memorial and Mark di Suvero’s Iroquois.
The aPA brings two new artworks this summer:
Symbiosis, a sculpture by artist Roxy Paine, is
T
he Association for Public Art (aPA)
has a secret to share: Some of
Philadelphia’s most notable art-
works are not hanging in its galler-
ies. The city itself is a museum.
hand-constructed from
pieces of stainless steel
pipe, plate, and metal
rods welded into struc-
tures resembling trees
and branching systems;
and artist Candy Coated
will transform Eakins
Oval into a whimsical
environment of color and illusion, with pro-
gramming presented by Philadelphia Parks and
Recreation and Fairmount Park Conservancy.
While on the Parkway, listen to the aPA’s
Museum Without Walls™: AUDIO, an inter-
pretive program that reveals the fascinating
stories of more than 65 sculptures throughout
the city. Artist Claes Oldenburg recalls the pins
that littered his studio, which inspired his
45-foot-tall Clothespin sculpture, while other
commenters compare the artwork to two people
embracing. Museum Without Walls™: AUDIO
is available by cell phone, app, audio download,
and online at museumwithoutwallsaudio.org.
Stroll Through the Art
165 usairwaysmag.com JUNE 2014
1528 Walnut St., Suite 1000
Philadelphia, PA
215.546.7550
associationforpublicart.org
Clockwise from top left:
Symbiosis (2011) by artist
Roxy Paine; a passerby
listens to the Museum
Without Walls™: AUDIO
program for LOVE (1976)
by Robert Indiana; artist
Candy Coated in her
studio.
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With the Philadelphia CityPass BY APRIL WHITE
Armed with a Philadelphia CityPASS ticket
booklet, you can save 46 percent off combined
admission to the city’s top attractions. Each
booklet contains prepaid entrance to The
Franklin Institute, Philadelphia Trolley Works
Tour, Adventure Aquarium, either the Phila-
delphia Zoo or the National Constitution Cen-
ter, and your choice between the Eastern State
Penitentiary and the Please Touch Museum.
The Philadelphia Trolley Works Tour ticket
gives you 24 hours of unlimited on/off privi-
W
ho doesn’t want a
great deal when they
travel? And if that deal
saves you both time and
money, all the better.
leges aboard trolleys and double-decker buses
that access 21 stops, including all of the City-
PASS attractions except the aquarium.
And, in addition to saving money, CityPASS
ticket booklets save time, by allowing you to
take the VIP route and skip most main-entrance
ticket lines. That’s a definite plus if you’re travel-
ing with antsy kids. The booklets are valid for
nine consecutive days, starting with the first day
of use, so you can see the included sights and
still have plenty of time to explore Reading
Terminal Market, take your photo in front of
the city’s famous LOVE statue, or run up the 72
steps to the entrance of the Philadelphia Mu-
seum of Art and pose like Rocky.
You can purchase CityPASS ticket booklets
online before you leave home or buy them when
you arrive in Philly. All of the included attrac-
tions sell the booklets at their box offices. Cost:
$62 for adults (value $115), $39 for kids, 2-12.
Access to
Adventure
164 JUNE 2014 usairwaysmag.com
For more
information, visit
citypass.com/philadelphia.
From left: The Franklin
Institute Rotunda,
Hammerhead shark at
the Adventure Aquarium,
Please Touch Museum
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New marketing initiatives place Philly’s cultural
happenings at your fingertips. BY JOANN GRECO
What to see and when to do it? The Greater
Philadelphia Cultural Alliance, which advo-
cates and markets for the area’s arts and cul-
tural community, has several sophisticated
tools to help.
Its comprehensive website phillyfunguide
.com, for instance, offers arts lovers a calendar
that lists thousands of events, searchable by
type, date, or location. And about 100,000
people have signed up for its popular Funsavers
initiative, a weekly email with half-price ticket
offers for a variety of local cultural happenings.
“Funsavers has been a great resource for
us,” says Sandy Catz, president of the Tri-State
Jazz Society. “It has brought in new audiences,
W
ith so many plays, exhibits, con-
certs, sporting events, lectures,
and walking tours to sample, Phila-
delphia visitors and residents are in
an enviable, if overwhelming position.
including younger music lovers and out-of-town
visitors, every time we’ve worked with it.”
Such programs are not the only way the
Alliance helps to ensure that institutions such as
these flourish. It has spearheaded an audience-
analysis project with 160 cultural groups that’s
resulted in a shared master database of 2.3 mil-
lion culture vultures; released research reports
that demonstrate the economic impact of the
arts and cultural sectors ($3.3 billion); and,
working with state and local officials, the Alli-
ance has also helped to establish public policies
that encourage and protect that sector.
Approachable Art
166 JUNE 2014 usairwaysmag.com
Greater
Philadelphia
Cultural Alliance
215.557.7811
philaculture.org
phillyfunguide.com
Top: Le Grand Continental/
Sylvain Émard Danse, part
of the 2012 Philadelphia
Live Arts Festival and Philly
Fringe (the 2014 Fringe is
Sept. 5–21).
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See what’s on next at the luminous Kimmel Center.
This summer it offers a full lineup of art events,
from independent theater and jazz residencies
to “The Composers,” a newly installed series of
busts of classical composers crafted from old
books by artist Long-Bin Chen.
Perhaps the most highly anticipated piece
of programming is the arrival of The Book of
Mormon, the Tony award-winning musical
from the creators of South Park, now on tour.
The show settles in for a six-week run on
July 29 to wrap up the Kimmel’s Broadway
Philadelphia series. Before then, theatergoers
W
ith its iconic glass roof and
state-of-the-art auditoriums,
the Kimmel Center is a sparkling
centerpiece on Philadelphia’s
Avenue of the Arts.
can enjoy the return of
Andrew Lloyd Webber’s
classic musical Evita
(June 17–22) and the
Philadelphia debut of
his recent stage adapta-
tion of The Wizard of
Oz (June 3–8), which
features several new
songs written with Tim Rice.
Also grabbing headlines at the Kimmel is
the latest entry from Iron Chef Jose Garces.
A return to the roots and inspirations for his
cooking, Volvér is proving to be innovative
in telling those stories. It offers decadent chef’s
tastings, and, like any other great show, they’re
available by prepaid ticket only. For those look-
ing for lighter but no less luxurious fare, the
accompanying Bar Volvér features elegant
noshes like tuna tartare and caviar, plus the
city’s largest selection of champagne.
Cultural Display
167 usairwaysmag.com JUNE 2014
BY JOANN GRECO
Kimmel Center for
the Performing Arts
300 South Broad St.
Philadelphia
215.893.1999
kimmelcenter.org

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The Benjamin Franklin Museum showcases
the life of this extraordinary individual. BY WES ISLEY
But he was also a teenage runaway and, later
in life, was accused of inciting riots against the
monarchy while living in England. Most fa-
mously, Franklin invented the lightning rod
and confirmed much of what we know about
electricity. Clearly, he was a brilliant man who
transformed our world.
Learn just how much Franklin influenced
Philadelphia and life in the U.S. with a visit
to the Benjamin Franklin Museum, located
within Independence National Historical
Park. Renovated and reopened in 2013, the
M
ost people imagine Benjamin
Franklin as a bespectacled, grand-
fatherly figure who signed the
Declaration of Independence and
helped craft the U.S. Constitution.
22,000-square-foot museum brings Franklin
to life by focusing on the compelling personality
of this inventor, statesman, and entrepreneur.
View possessions such as the family Bible and
a favorite armchair, and artifacts from Franklin’s
printing and publishing businesses. Exhibits also
explore his contributions to science, firefighting,
higher education, and medical care. The mu-
seum engages all ages with computer animation,
hands-on objects, and touchscreen games.
Of course, the museum is only one attraction
within Independence National Historical Park,
which includes many sites connected to Frank-
lin’s exceptional life. There’s Independence Hall,
where the Constitution was signed; City Tavern,
where Franklin often dined; Franklin Court,
where his home and printing office once stood;
and Christ Church, where Franklin lies at rest.
Think you know Ben Franklin? A visit to
the museum that bears his name will make
you think again.
Relevant
Revolutionary
168 JUNE 2014 usairwaysmag.com
Benjamin Franklin
Museum
Independence National
Historical Park
317 Chestnut St.
Philadelphia, PA
215.965.2305
nps.gov/inde
Interactive displays,
touchscreen games, and
computer animation make
learning fun for all ages.
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Over 142 years, it held 75,000 inmates in 980
cells, originally designed around a strict, soli-
tary confinement rehabilitation approach that
fell out of favor in the early 20th century. Revo-
lutionary for its time, Eastern State Peniten-
tiary’s radial architectural design was copied by
hundreds of prisons worldwide, and the build-
ing is also noted for having indoor plumbing
and central heat before the White House.
The penitentiary’s vaulted, sky-lit cells held
hard-boiled criminals such as famous bank
robber “Slick Willie” Sutton and gangster
“Scarface” Al Capone — although fine furni-
ture and a cabinet radio made Capone’s stay
relatively luxurious.
The prison closed in 1971 and sat aban-
doned for more than 20 years. Now in a state of
semi-ruin, the facility is open for tours every
day, year-round. An audio tour narrated by actor
Steve Buscemi guides visitors through crum-
bling cellblocks,
past empty guard
towers, and into
Death Row and
the underground
punishment cells.
A series of short,
interactive experi-
ences allows
visitors to unlock
a cell, open the
massive front
gate, learn to play
bocce, tour the
Operating Room,
F
rom the day its doors opened in 1829,
Eastern State Penitentiary gained a
reputation for its hub-and-spoke
floor plan, controversial confinement
practices, and infamous inmates.
A Notorious Past
169 usairwaysmag.com JUNE 2014
From left: the prison’s
imposing exterior; visitors
tour Cellblock 7
Take a step back in time while exploring one of the
most famous prisons in the country. BY WES ISLEY
and more.
In addition to its daily
tours, Eastern State
Penitentiary hosts special
events throughout the
year, such as an Alumni
Reunion with former
guards and inmates,
Prison Food Weekend,
and Terror Behind the Walls, a haunted attrac-
tion consistently ranked among the top in the
nation.
Eastern State
Penitentiary
2027 Fairmount Ave.
Philadelphia, PA
215.236.3300
easternstate.org
170 JUNE 2014 usairwaysmag.com
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The venerable Franklin Institute is on the move
again with astounding new exhibits. BY JOANN GRECO
Unveiled this month, the Franklin Institute’s
$41 million expansion adds 53,000 square feet
to an already abundant assemblage of thought-
provoking science exhibits. The three-story
wing will house a state-of-the-art traveling
exhibit gallery, plus conference and education
space. The centerpiece of the expansion, Your
Brain, is the largest permanent exhibit at the
museum and in the country, dedicated to the
understanding of the brain.
The museum opened in its limestone struc-
ture in 1934, more than a century after the
T
he new Nicholas and Athena
Karabots Pavilion literally
shimmers thanks to 10,000
aluminum panels that undulate
in response to the winds.
institute was first established as a private orga-
nization dedicated to advancing the inventions
of Benjamin Franklin. During the last eight
decades, the museum has expanded with the
times, starting with a bevy of pendulums and
pulleys, adding a belching 1920s locomotive
and a walk-through model of a human heart,
and then incorporating the latest technology.
With Your Brain, the institute ups the inter-
active quotient. A wall-sized video installation
greets museum-goers with a graphic represen-
tation of their neurological system. Elsewhere,
a two-story climbing structure comes alive with
lighting and sound effects as visitors ascend.
The pavilion’s inaugural traveling exhibit
offers still more exhilarating experiences.
Circus! Science Under the Big Top explores the
physics behind great high-wire acts and allows
thrill-seekers to launch cannon balls and tiptoe
across tightropes. Once you leave the institute,
you won’t see the world in the same way.
The Science of You
The Franklin
Institute
222 N. 20th St.
Philadelphia, PA
215.448.1200
fi.edu
Highlights of the Your Brain
exhibit, and (center) the new
Nicholas and Athena
Karabots Pavilion
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Explore the maritime history of the Delaware River
and the vessels that have called her home.
At the Independence Seaport Museum, visitors
can discover that history as they explore exhibi-
tions, peek in on a shipbuilding workshop, and
climb aboard two anchored vessels designated as
National Historic Landmarks.
Dating from 1892, the gleaming Olympia
was Admiral Dewey’s flagship during the Span-
ish American War, and is the only warship from
that conflict still afloat. The Becuna, a 1944
submarine, served in World War II and, after
being equipped with radar and nuclear war-
heads, in the Korean and Vietnam wars. Both
T
he history of Philadelphia is inextri-
cably linked to the Delaware River,
from its beginnings as a colonial
city to its primacy as one of the
world’s great working ports.
ships are open during mu-
seum hours, and behind-
the-scenes tours take place
on the first Saturday of
every month. For a unique
view, the museum rents
rowboats and kayaks so you
can row up to and around
these ships.
The museum’s permanent collection delves
into the waterfront’s history, from its early naval
heroes and the birth of the U.S. Navy, to its
growth as a mercantile and ship-building center
and its development as an industrial and recre-
ational powerhouse.
This summer, visit exhibits including Tides of
Freedom: African Presence on the Delaware River,
which traces 300 years of African American expe-
rience in the Delaware Valley and is curated by
Dr. Tukufu Zuberi, the host of the PBS Series
History Detectives.
Ahoy Matey!
171 usairwaysmag.com JUNE 2014
BY JOANN GRECO
Independence
Seaport Museum
Penn’s Landing on the
Delaware River
211 S. Columbus Blvd. &
Walnut St.
Philadelphia, PA
215.413.8655
phillyseaport.org
Tour the Cruiser Olympia,
the world’s oldest floating
steel warship, at the
Independence Seaport
Museum.
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Documenting our rights and freedoms
at the National Constitution Center
As a museum, the National Constitution
Center brings the U.S. Constitution to life
for all ages through interactive exhibitions,
theatrical performances, and original docu-
ments of freedom.
As a Headquarters for Civic Education,
the Constitution Center offers educators
and students cutting-edge resources
including the premier online Interactive
Constitution.
As America’s Town Hall, the Constitution
Center hosts timely conversations featuring
I
n the city’s heart, the National
Constitution Center is the
Museum of We the People,
America’s Town Hall, and
a Center for Civic Education.
distinguished speakers from across the politi-
cal spectrum, including U.S. Supreme Court
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg.
Now through October 19, the National
Constitution Center is presenting the powerful
Slavery at Jefferson’s Monticello, an exhibition
that follows the stories of six enslaved families
who lived and worked at Jefferson’s Virginia
plantation — the Fossett, Granger, Gillette,
Hemings, Hern, and Hubbard families — and
the legacy of their descendants.
The exhibition includes nearly 300 artifacts
that represent each family’s trade as well as
personal items of the third president, including
a walking stick, a chess set, eyeglasses, and
a replica of the portable desk used to draft the
Declaration of Independence.
Explore the story of slavery in early U.S.
history while discovering the struggle and
the self-determination at the heart of America’s
founding.
Law of the Land
172 JUNE 2014 usairwaysmag.com 173 usairwaysmag.com JUNE 2014
Interactive exhibitions
and theatrical
performances
at the National
Constitution Center
bring America’s story
to life for visitors.
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The National Museum of American
Jewish History celebrates baseball. BY NANCY OAKLEY
The bases are loaded for Chasing Dreams:
Baseball and Becoming American at Philadel-
phia’s National Museum of American Jewish
History (NMAJH).
On view through October 26, the exhibi-
tion illustrates how baseball is truly America’s
national pastime, given that it has provided a
way for minority and immigrant groups to be
a part of the American mainstream. Jewish
heroes of the game, such as “Hammerin’
Hank” Greenberg of the Detroit
Tigers and Pittsburgh Pirates, and
Sandy Koufax of Brooklyn and Los
Angeles Dodgers fame, take center
stage alongside Jackie Robinson,
Roberto Clemente, Joe DiMaggio,
and Ichiro Suzuki, the first Japa-
nese position player to play in the
major leagues.
Not that you have to be a base-
ball aficionado to appreciate Chas-
ing Dreams. There’s something
here for everyone: the original sheet
music for “Take Me Out to the
Ballgame,” Little League memora-
bilia, and a nod to executives,
journalists, fans, and vendors like
Esther Schimmel of St. Louis,
I
magine priceless signed base-
balls, scorecards, photographs,
bobbleheads, uniforms, and
more — a grand total of 130
pieces of game memorabilia.
Missouri, who kept kosher — even while
selling non-kosher hot dogs. This decid-
edly human approach is due, in part,
to the museum’s call for objects, which
was posted on a Tumblr page that quickly
became filled with fans’ photos and
recollections of stick-ball games, ballpark
weddings, and more.
Assuming you can tear yourself away
from all things baseball, check out NMAJH’s
permanent holdings tracing the history of Jews
in the United States and their contributions
to American culture through art, civic ser-
vice, charitable organizations, and work.
From the sublime, consisting of paintings
and religious artifacts, to the everyday, such
as a Singer sewing machine and a Yiddish type-
writer, you’ll agree that the museum’s collection,
like Chasing Dreams, hits it out of the park.
A Home Run
National Museum of
American Jewish History
101 S. Independence Mall East,
Philadelphia, PA
215.923.3811, nmajh.org
From top: Jackie
Robinson pin; Hank
Greenberg and Joe
DiMaggio
525 Arch St.
Philadelphia, PA
ConstitutionCenter.org
Follow ConstitutionCtr on
, , , and .
215.409.6700
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For 127 years, Penn Museum archaeologists and
anthropologists have been exploring the world.
Founded in 1887, the Penn Museum’s aspira-
tions have always been grand. More than 350
expeditions (and still counting) later, the inter-
nationally renowned museum and research
center, located on the University of Pennsylva-
nia’s urban campus, offers the public an aston-
ishing view of world cultures through time and
across continents.
Housed in an eclectic-style Arts and Crafts
building with tranquil inner gardens, fountains,
a reflecting pool, and nearly one million arti-
facts, the museum, according to director Julian
Siggers, “encapsulates the story of humanity.”
It’s a big, diverse story. Guests can wander from
famous Mesopotamian treasures of Queen
Puabi, to colossal architectural elements from
the Palace of the Egyptian pharaoh Merenptah,
to Mayan stone monuments from Central
America, and Buddhist sculptures and wall
T
he result of those travels?
Today’s visitors can
take an international
expedition through the
museum’s galleries.
paintings from Asia. Materials from Africa and
the Americas — some traditional, some more
contemporary — are also represented, while
special exhibitions enrich the signature offerings.
Worlds Intertwined: Etruscans, Greeks, and
Romans, a suite of galleries with more than
1,400 ancient Mediterranean objects, explores
the inter-relatedness of the three ancient cul-
tures, but the museum itself offers an opportu-
nity to explore the diversity and interconnec-
tions of human societies past and present.
“Our aspirational mission,” Siggers notes,
“is to transform understanding of the human
experience.”
An Expansive View
174 JUNE 2014 usairwaysmag.com
Penn Museum
3260 South St.
Philadelphia, PA
215.898.4000
penn.museum
From top: an exhibition
of Egyptian artifacts and
one of the museum’s
tranquil outdoor gardens
175 usairwaysmag.com JUNE 2014
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Magnetism — Philadelphia’s got it.
It’s this diversity, found in Philadelphia’s muse-
ums, theaters, restaurants, nightlife, and profes-
sional sports teams that attracts millions of
visitors annually.
Philadelphia is also one of the most easily
accessible U.S. destinations, and has a reservoir
of 11,000 hotel rooms. Hosting guests is one of
the things the city does best.
Tens of thousands of art revelers will appre-
ciate this hospitality when they attend the third
biennial Philadelphia International Festival of
the Arts (PIFA) April 10–25, 2015. An unparal-
leled feast of plays, musicals, art exhibits, sym-
phonies, bands, dancers, and singers will lure
O
ffering visitors the Liberty Bell and
Philly cheesesteaks alongside five-
star restaurants, the city is historic yet
avant-garde, attracting leisure,
business, and convention travelers.
tourists from around
the globe to the city
to immerse them-
selves in all things
art, and feast on
international cuisine.
Business planners
are timing conven-
tions and meetings
to coincide with PIFA so attendees can experi-
ence daily exhibits and performances that are
typically scheduled months apart, even in major
cities. The newly expanded Pennsylvania Con-
vention Center (PCC) makes it easy to plan
conferences via a new partnership with SMG.
While the PCC is known for its beauty, high-
tech amenities, and sheer size (it’s one of the
nation’s largest convention facilities), SMG is
recognized for best practices in customer service.
With a magnetic personality and all the
right resources in place, Philadelphia is “Here
for the Making” — whether it’s memories,
business, meetings, or a new start.
Here for the Making
1700 Market St.
Suite 3000
Philadelphia, PA
215.636.3300
discoverPHL.com
From left:
The Philadelphia
International Festival
of the Arts features
performers, music, food,
and attractions for all ages;
The Pennsylvania
Convention Center has
79 meeting rooms, 1 million
square feet of saleable
space, and the most
expansive ballroom
space in the Northeast.
Playing with
a Purpose
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The home of the Philadelphia Eagles
undergoes a fan-friendly facelift.
Located only a few miles from the Philadelphia
airport, Lincoln Financial Field has served as a
meeting ground for Eagles fans since the sta-
dium’s debut in 2003. In 2014, fans will be intro-
duced to a new level of excitement at “The
Linc,” as the Eagles finish a two-year revitaliza-
tion project that will enhance the game-day
experience for all visitors.
“We talked with our season-ticket members
over the past few years to find out what was
important to them. We developed this plan of
action as a direct result of those conversations,”
says team President Don Smolenski. “Our
main goal was to dramatically enhance the
game-day experience for our fans. They de-
serve an exciting and fun experience every
time they enter Lincoln Financial Field.”
A
s you begin your descent into the City of
Brotherly Love, you may be able to hear
the chants of “Fly Eagles Fly” echoing
from Lincoln Financial Field — home
of the Philadelphia Eagles.
Upon completion prior to the start of the
the upcoming preseason, The Linc will have
upgraded amenities for all fans, including:
■ Two new high-definition video boards, one
in each end zone, that are 100 feet longer
than the previous screens
■ An extended group of LED ribbon-board
displays that will present fans with 360
degrees of video, animation, stats, and more
■ Approximately 1,600 new seats in the north-
west, southwest, and northeast corners
■ An in-stadium Wi-Fi network that will allow
fans to be able to keep up with their fantasy
teams, watch video highlights, and check
stats on their mobile devices
■ A dynamic graphic package that prominently
displays images of memorable moments and
legendary players from Eagles history
throughout the corridors of the stadium
■ Completely renovated club lounges through-
out the stadium
■ Stadium-wide audio/visual updates, includ-
ing the addition of over 1,150 HDTVs
As the newest group of Eagles hits the
gridiron in 2014, fans will have something to
be excited about — both on the field and off.
Revitalizing The Linc
176 JUNE 2014 usairwaysmag.com
Learn More
For additional details and
updates on the stadium’s
renovations, visit events
.lincolnfinancialfield.com/
stadium-reno.
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But for the little patrons who visit the Please
Touch Museum, these actions all weave
together seamlessly and successfully.
Located in Memorial Hall at Fairmount
Park, the museum showcases eight eclectic
exhibit “zones” that enhance social and cogni-
tive skill development — but that’s the last
thing on children’s minds when they enter
the 156,000-square-foot space dedicated to
their enjoyment.
Play hopscotch on a cloud? Sure! Drive a
boat, gas a car, and shop for your own grocer-
ies? Why, yes, you can. Row a flying machine?
Give it a try!
Named by Huffington Post as one of eight
“uncommonly cool children’s museums in the
U.S.,” the Please Touch Museum engages all
the senses to spark interest and encourage
D
ream. Imagine. Create.
The images these words
evoke are often juxtaposed
with learn, develop, and
accomplish.
177 usairwaysmag.com JUNE 2014

The Please Touch Museum is a wonderland of fun —
and learning — for children. BY SUSAN NEWELL
children to explore and learn by
experience. It’s a strategy that’s proven
successful for 37 years: The museum
has relocated or expanded four times
in order to add space and now
attracts more than half a million
visitors annually.
Even for adults, the sheer
expanse of the museum and its
exhibits is impressive. But for little feet and
hands, it’s a dream come true. Activities run
the gamut — from making music in the
Rainforest Rhythm zone, to exploring lily
pads and insects during water play in River
Adventure, role playing at the Children’s
Hospital of Philadelphia, and jumping down
the rabbit hole in Wonderland.
The biggest challenge parents face?
Convincing their children to leave.
The Please Touch
Museum
Memorial Hall
at Fairmont Park
4231 Avenue of the Republic
Philadelphia
215.581.3181
pleasetouchmuseum.org
179 usairwaysmag.com JUNE 2014
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Refined and modern, jewelry by Lagos
never goes out of style. BY WES ISLEY
Since 1977, Philadelphia’s Lagos has presented
timeless jewelry collections crafted as elegant
works of art, yet meant to be worn by modern
women every day for every occasion. Each
piece blends contemporary jewelry trends with
artful inspiration and expert craftsmanship,
reflecting the vision of Founder and Creative
Director Steven Lagos.
Gold receives a modern makeover in two
new Lagos collections. Caviar Gold offers
iconic Lagos caviar-like beading in shimmer-
ing 18-karat gold. Combine a refined Caviar
Gold beaded bracelet with earrings and
a Lagos band ring set with pavé diamonds,
C
lassic and sophisticated, yet
unmistakably modern. Does
this describe Lagos jewelry
or the woman who wears it?
You’re correct on both counts.
or make your statement wearing
a gold necklace and ring with
striking black agate accents.
The 18-karat gold Covet collec-
tion marries subtle signature
Caviar beading with pavé dia-
monds, rubies, and sapphires for a
lovely feminine allure. A variety of
designs allow for layering multiple
silhouettes — a lasting trend in jewelry,
perfect for going directly from the boardroom
to a night out on the town.
Of his two newest collections, Steven says,
“There’s something magical about gold. People
are intrinsically drawn to it. You feel its allure,
wealth, and power when you wear it.”
It’s this passion for the materials and the
design, even down to the emblematic crest
adorning the clasp of most every piece, that
makes Lagos both beautiful to wear and appro-
priate for any occasion. While in Philadelphia,
visit Lagos’ flagship store in chic Rittenhouse
Square.
Timeless Appeal
Clockwise from top
left: Rittenhouse
Square store; items
from the Covet
collection; Steven
Lagos, founder and
creative director
LAGOS
1735 Walnut St.
Philadelphia, PA
215.567.0770
lagos.com
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Macy’s Center City in Philadelphia
fuses fashion and history. BY IVY LAMB
T
here aren’t many places that
appeal to both shopaholics
and history buffs — but Macy’s
Center City in downtown
Philadelphia is one of them.
Blending old and
new, Macy’s Cen-
ter City boasts
157,940 square
feet of the latest
trends in fashion
and home decor,
all housed in the
historic Wana-
maker Building.
The store was
originally opened
in 1911 by pio-
neering retailer
John Wanamaker. At the time, the 12-story build-
ing was the largest department store in the world.
During construction, Wanamaker bought the
pipe organ from the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair
and had it installed in the seven-story atrium of
the store. It took two years to install the 10,000
pipes, but Wanamaker decided that the organ
still wasn’t loud enough. He opened his own
pipe-organ factory on the 12th floor of the store,
and between 1911 and 1930 he added an addi-
tional 18,000 pipes. It remains the world’s largest
performing pipe organ today, and shoppers still
hear its melodic tones twice daily, Monday
through Saturday.
Wanamaker was also known for introducing
new retail concepts. He was the first to put a
guaranteed refund policy in place, open a public
restaurant in a department store, illuminate his
store with electricity, and use a Bell Telephone
in a store. He also provided his employees with a
recreation center, an on-site infirmary, and free
educational opportunities.
Wanamaker’s trailblazing store was acquired
by Macy’s in 2006. Today, Macy’s is proud to
preserve this unique piece of American retail
history and present such events as the Christmas
Light Show, Dickens’ Village, Christmas Win-
dow Unveilings, special organ performances,
and behind-the-scenes tours.
Retail Pioneer
178 JUNE 2014 usairwaysmag.com
Macy’s Center City
Macy’s Center City
1300 Market Street
Philadelphia, PA
215.241.9000
visitmacysphiladelphia.com
Philadelphia
College of
Osteopathic
Medicine
4170 City Ave.
Philadelphia, PA
800.999.6998
admissions.PCOM.edu
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Forward thinking is the hallmark of medical education
at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine.
One of the leading medical schools in the U.S.
since its founding in 1899, PCOM proved itself
ahead of the times 12 years ago by creating a
competency-based curriculum rather than the
traditional time-based system. The result: better-
qualified medical professionals. “From day
one, when the medical student hits campus,
we start teaching the basic science along with
the clinical medicine. This natural marriage
of understanding why we’re doing what we’re
doing occurs throughout all four years of
medical school,” says Art Sesso, DO, program
director, general surgery.
To enhance the quality of a competency-
based educational strategy, PCOM recently
opened its new Clinical Learning and Assess-
ment Center, a state-of-the-art 11,000-square-
foot facility that includes 15 patient exam
rooms, 4 simulator training rooms, an OR, an
ER and trauma bay, an ICU and CCU suite,
and 68 simulation trainers. One of the key
approaches in real-world simulation is to allow
students to fail in a safe environment where
they can learn from their mistakes.
PCOM’s simulation center is also a critical
training ground that addresses the evolution in
today’s medical field from a single-physician
delivery system to a team-based approach.
PCOM’s simulations are designed to incorpo-
rate assessments involving first responders,
nursing personnel, and clinicians. This
ensures higher-quality medical care and cost-
effectiveness. The simulation lab is enabled to
E
xcellence in education is
the founding principle at
the Philadelphia College
of Osteopathic Medicine
(PCOM).
communicate with classrooms throughout
the campus, allowing larger groups to be
actively involved.
In addition to training students in the
doctor of osteopathic medicine and physi-
cian assistant studies programs, the Center’s
standardized patient program allows stu-
dents in PCOM’s mental health counseling
and school and clinical psychology pro-
grams to hone their skills with actors who por-
tray a range of mental and cognitive disorders.
Learning By Doing
181 usairwaysmag.com JUNE 2014
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A focus on excellence and leadership encourages
students to excel during and after college.
Over the college’s 57-year history, St. Frances
Xavier’s order — the Missionary Sisters of the
Sacred Heart of Jesus — transformed the
magnificent Woodcrest Estate into a small but
extraordinary liberal arts college.
Among the many colleges and universities
on Philadelphia’s Main Line, Cabrini is recog-
nized for academic excellence, leadership de-
velopment, and a commitment to social justice.
With more than 30 majors, Cabrini wel-
comes students of all faiths, cultures, and back-
grounds, and encourages them to learn and
serve in locations around the world, including
Appalachia, New Orleans, Guatemala, Ecua-
dor, and Swaziland.
I
nspired by St. Frances Xavier
Cabrini, the first American
citizen to become a saint, Cabrini
College was founded in Radnor,
Pennsylvania, in 1957.
Students excel both in and outside the class-
room, and the Cabrini Cavaliers have captured
numerous conference championships. In fact,
six of the college’s 16 Division III athletic teams
advanced to NCAA tournaments last year.
The school graduates large numbers of
Pennsylvania teachers. Other top majors include
communications, business, psychology, and the
sciences. Thanks to small class sizes, students
receive personal attention from nationally rec-
ognized professors who regularly publish work
and receive research grants. Together, students
and faculty travel the globe to teach, learn, and
share ideas.
Cabrini has the numbers to show that this
combination works; within ten months of gradu-
ation, 95 percent of graduates are employed or
in graduate school.
Cabrini students intern at the White House,
network TV affiliates, and major biotech,
pharmaceutical, and financial companies.
On campus and beyond, Cabrini students
and alumni live out the college’s tagline: “Do
something extraordinary.”
An Extraordinary
Education
180 JUNE 2014 usairwaysmag.com
610 King of Prussia Rd.
Radnor, PA
610.902.8100
cabrini.edu
Above, from left: Cabrini
students during a spring
break service trip in
Guatemala; students
working in a science lab
182 JUNE 2014 usairwaysmag.com 183 usairwaysmag.com JUNE 2014
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And while Philadelphia has its share of adven-
tures for moms and dads — the city is packed
with historical sites where you can walk in the
footsteps of Thomas Jefferson and Ben Frank-
lin — let’s face it: Many
kids would much rather
walk in the footsteps of
Big Bird and Elmo.
Fortunately, there’s
Sesame Place, the only
theme park in the U.S.
dedicated entirely to the
award-winning children’s
television show, Sesame
Street. Located just 30
minutes north of Philadel-
phia, Sesame Place is
T
raveling with
children can be
challenging for
parents and little
ones alike.
tailor-made for the younger crowd, so you won’t
have to explain why they can’t ride the big-kid
roller coaster. Already a nearly 35-year tradition
for families across the region, Sesame Place has
whirling rides, water slides, and one-of-a-kind
shows featuring all of the favorite characters. So
how do you get to Sesame Street? It’s right there
in the heart of Sesame Place, come to life as a
full-scale replica of the block we all know so
well from TV. There, kids can meet furry
friends and even join in to sing and dance to-
gether in the Neighborhood Street Party Parade.
On the real Sesame Street, there’s always
something new to see and learn. The same
goes for Sesame Place, where seasonal, interac-
tive shows and events keep families coming
back every year.
This year, the park debuted a new musical
mystery show, Elmo the Musical — Live at
Sesame Place! Soon, it’ll be Cookie Monster’s
time to shine. Everyone’s favorite blue monster
will open Cookie’s Monster Land, and he’s
bringing along his new Sesame Street friends,
Honker and Dinger! Cookie’s Monster Land is
perfect for kids of all ages, with five new rides, a
three-story net climb, a soft play area, and more.
Once summer is over, the fun doesn’t stop
at Sesame Place. There’s at least one character
who couldn’t let Halloween pass by without
some serious celebrating — The Count, of
course! In the fall, The Count’s Halloween
Spooktacular gives families a thrill with festive
mazes, storytelling hayrides, and a monster-
themed disco dance party that’s so much fun,
even moms and dads might join in. And don’t
worry: The Count has assured everyone that
the Spooktacular is certified nightmare-proof.
During the holiday season, Sesame Place
transforms into a winter wonderland for A Very
Furry Christmas. In addition to everyone’s
favorite Sesame Street characters, Santa Claus
himself will be there, giving all the good little
boys and girls a tour of his workshop. Of
course, it wouldn’t be Christmas without a
larger-than-life tree that puts on an impressive
magical light show. Parents can also take care
of last-minute shopping at the many seasonal
gift shops on-site. And if you’ve shopped ’til
you’ve dropped, just hop on the Furry Express
train for a fun-filled tour through the Ginger-
bread Cookie Factory.
Sesame Place
100 Sesame Road
Langhorne, PA
866.GO.4.ELMO
sesameplace.com
From thrilling rides to kids’
favorite TV characters,
the fun never stops at
Sesame Place.
Show
Time!
Clockwise from
bottom left:
Elmo and
friend; fun at
The Count’s
Splash Castle;
Cookie Monster
greets a buddy
during the
Neighborhood
Street Party
Parade
™©2014 Sesame Workshop
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Y
ou visited Independence Hall and
the Liberty Bell, of course. You
ate your way through the Italian
Market (on your way to dinner
on East Passyunk Avenue).
You saw a concert at the Kimmel Center, ex-
plored the museums of the Benjamin Franklin
Parkway, cheered for the Phillies (hopefully!) at
Citizens Bank Park, and people-watched in
Rittenhouse Square. Ask a Philadelphian what
you should do on your next visit, and they’ll
suggest you head for the countryside.
It’s great advice. Philadelphians know that
the region’s attractions don’t end at the city’s
borders, especially in the summer. It’s an ideal
time to explore outlying towns and their gardens,
parks, main streets, and waterways.
Philly’s Center City is the perfect starting
point for your excursion, with numerous towns
and attractions located within an hour’s drive.
Easily accessible by major roads or — for towns
including Media, Ardmore, and Manayunk,
among others — affordable public transporta-
tion. Rejuvenation is rarely so convenient.
Garden Spaces
If you prefer a leisurely pace, head to any one of
these towns’ public gardens and outdoor retreats.
Drive 30 minutes northeast up I-95 to reach
the 235-acre Silver Lake Nature Center in Bris-
tol (silverlakenaturecenter.org), and watch for
the rare, red-bellied turtle, and the coastal
plain leopard frog. From there, head north to
New Hope and Bowman’s Hill Wildflower
Preserve (bhwp.org), with nearly 800 native
plants. Nothing beats a June stroll when the
preserve is awash in honeysuckle, magnolia,
azalea, and rhododendron (except maybe July’s
butterfly weed and purple giant hyssop, or
August’s sunflowers).
For a more manicured experience, head 30
minutes west of Center City to the gardens of
Chanticleer in Wayne (chanticleergarden.org).
This former private estate is lush with more
than 5,000 plants. Here, garden hobbyists chat
with Chanticleer’s horticulturists, and painters
capture the riotous summer colors of the Grav-
el Garden, or the architecture and ever-chang-
ing foliage of the Ruin Garden. Detour on your
way back to Center City, and stop by Chestnut
Hill’s Morris Arboretum (morrisarboretum.org).
Enjoy a bird’s-eye view of majestic, old trees
while touring the property on a walkway that’s
50-feet high.
Twenty minutes south of Center City, you’ll
find more than 650 acres of preserved wood-
lands, wetlands, and meadows, 195 bird species,
and 17 acres of trails at the Tyler Arboretum
(tylerarboretum.org) in Media. In the summer,
the butterfly house and its fanciful treehouses
delight younger visitors. Next, pick up the Balti-
more Pike to reach Longwood Gardens in
Kennett Square in less than 30 minutes. Long-
wood (longwoodgardens.org) is another can’t-
miss for nature lovers — even on the occasional
rainy summer day. The extensive greenhouses
are as impressive as the grounds.
Active travelers will find plenty to see and do
just outside of Philadelphia.
Pushing
Boundaries
Clockwise from
left: Chanticleer,
Longwood Gardens,
and Tyler Arboretum
186 JUNE 2014 usairwaysmag.com 187 usairwaysmag.com JUNE 2014
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Festivals and Fab
Explore the surrounding arts and music scene
within an hour northwest of Philly’s Center City
at First Friday celebrations in the downtowns
of Ambler (firstfridaysinambler.wordpress.com),
Ardmore (firstfridaymainline.com), and Phoenix-
ville (phxfirstfriday.com).
Summer fairs and festivals capture the local
arts scene and town flair, from Media’s arts
tion for housewares (check out Heart of the
Home) and fashion (try Savioni Boutique). And
Bristol is home to the Doo Wop Festival in
September.
Outdoor Places
Experiencing the Philly region by foot, bike,
or water can be as active or as leisurely as you
like. Using Center City again as your base, it’s
less than ten miles to the Schuylkill River Trail
in Manayunk (schuylkillrivertrail.com). Grab
bike rentals from the Wheel Fun Kiosk and
enjoy a smooth ride. Just east along the Mount
Airy neighborhood is 1,400-acre Wissahickon
Valley Park, a popular destination for mountain
bikers. A gravel path along Wissahickon Creek
welcomes casual bikers and hikers, while more
adventurous two-wheelers tackle the hills
around Forbidden Drive. (The most challenging
upper areas require legit skills and a park per-
mit.) And if you’re an experienced climber, your
destination is the 35-foot-high Livezey Rock on
the eastern slope of the Wissahickon Valley.
Want more? Head northwest on the
Schuylkill River Trail into Valley Forge. A
destination unto itself, the Valley Forge Na-
tional Historical Park offers visitors a glimpse of
how Pennsylvania looked during the American
Revolution. Wander the trails
or try a guided tour. From
Valley Forge, the trail contin-
ues on-road another eight
miles into Phoenixville.
Speaking of Phoenixville,
check out the canoe, kayak,
and paddleboat trips offered at Port Providence
Paddle (canoeandkayak.biz). It’s one of many
launch points for enjoying a wet, but not too
wild, take on the region.
To see the Brandywine by kayak or canoe,
head about 45 minutes west of Center City to
West Chester. Short-trippers ride to Harvey’s
Bridge or Embreeville to float downstream for
an hour or two to Northbrook Canoe Co.
(northbrookcanoe.com); day-trippers push
off from Northbrook for a trip of several hours
into the landscapes made famous by painter
Andrew Wyeth.
Unwind from your adventures in West Ches-
ter’s vibrant downtown. Find local flavors at
Carlino’s Market, or curb your sweet tooth at
Éclat Chocolates. Do take advantage of outdoor
dining at the Iron Hill Brewery and its full selec-
tion of seasonal and house brews on tap. What
better reward for a day of outdoor adventure
than a local ice-cold brew enjoyed al fresco?
Plan Your Trip
Find details and
themed itineraries at
visitphilly.com/towns.
Clockwise from bottom left:
fresh local produce, Bredenbeck’s
Bakery & Ice Cream Parlor, scenic
waterways, and Valley Forge
National Historical Park
celebration (June 8) to New Hope’s three-day
Revolutionary War reenactment featuring Wash-
ington’s crossing of the Delaware River (June
20–22). Don’t miss the arts festivals in Ambler
(June 13), Manayunk (June 21–22), and Jenkin-
town (September 21). Kennett Square hosts its
popular Mushroom Festival (September 6–8), a
crowd pleaser for sure.

Shopping Satisfaction
Any day of the summer is ideal for exploring the
antique shops of Skippack, as well as the bou-
tiques, farmers’ markets, and outdoor dining
options of the various countryside towns — and
you’ll soak up a dose of sunshine on your shop-
ping spree.
In less than a half hour from Center City,
you can stroll Germantown Avenue in Chest-
nut Hill. Start your day with an espresso from
Chestnut Hill Coffee, or end it on a sweet note
at Bredenbeck’s Bakery & Ice Cream Parlor
(bredenbecks.com) with a scoop of Philadel-
phia’s own Bassett’s Ice Cream.
Head 30 minutes north to reach scenic
downtown Doylestown, home to independent
shops like the Doylestown Bookshop (doyles
townbookshop.com). Take another short jaunt to
New Hope’s Main Street, a shopper’s destina-
What better reward
for a day of outdoor
adventure than a local
ice-cold brew enjoyed
al fresco?
188 JUNE 2014 usairwaysmag.com 189 usairwaysmag.com JUNE 2014
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“I
can breathe here!” It’s a familiar
refrain heard from travelers far and
wide who’ve traded the frenzy of
their busy lifestyles for a respite in
bucolic Peddler’s Village.
is anything but sleepy. There’s a wealth of activi-
ties here. Check in at the newly renovated
Golden Plough Inn, with its historical character
and 21st century perks, like Wi-Fi, a modern
business center, and all-day activated lobby.
The Village offers one-of-a-kind shops and
galleries from Irish crafts and gifts, hats, home
accents, designer fashions, a salon and spa, to
jewelry and cookery ware from the basic to the
obscure. Stop for chicken pot pie or pot roast at
the traditional Cock ’n Bull, craft beer and
gourmet burgers at the casual Buttonwood
Grill, or steaks, chops and a buzzy bar at Earl’s
Bucks County. If the kids are in tow, don’t miss
Giggleberry Fair, a wonderland that includes an
indoor obstacle course, an upgraded game
room, and an antique carousel.
Like so many of the area, including nearby
New Hope, where the renovated Bucks County
Playhouse offers off-Broadway fare, Peddler’s
Village thrives on the artistic. Events include
this month’s Fine Art and Contemporary Craft
Show, an outdoor exhibition of paintings,
drawings, sculpture, photography, and more.
With each season, there’s a celebration of
the region’s bounty: strawberries in spring,
peaches in summer, and apples in the fall.
Autumn brings the Scarecrow Festival, where
you can build your own straw man, or join in a
pie-eating contest. And, as you might expect,
the holidays are perhaps the most enchanting
time of year, with natural decorations, one mil-
lion twinkling lights, and a Christmas Parade.
Brimming with so much beauty and artistry,
it’s no surprise that Peddler’s Village is a favorite
location for corporate retreats, weddings, family
reunions, and many other celebrations. The
Village was made to celebrate all that’s good in
life. Upon leaving, you might feel a little sad,
much like the romantic lead in the musical
Brigadoon, who upon returning to city life,
mourns the bygone charms of the Scottish
village. But unlike Brigadoon, which only
appears out of the mist every 100 years, Ped-
dler’s Village will always be here, waiting for
your return. So, what are you waiting for?
Routes 202 & 263
Lahaska, Pennsylvania
215.794.4000
peddlersvillage.com
Peddler’s Village is one man’s vision
and everyone’s dream.
A Renaissance
in Bucks County
Clockwise from left:
The 42-acre land-
scaped grounds of
Peddler’s Village in
spring; The country
shopping village offers
65 specialty shops; one
million jewel-colored
holiday lights; Enjoy
family-friendly
entertainment at 15
seasonal festivals; the
antique operating
Carousel at the
Giggleberry Fair family
entertainment center; a
beautiful and spacious
Town & Country guest
room at the Golden
Plough Inn
Nestled in southeastern Pennsylvania’s rolling
hills of central Bucks County (so named for its
resemblance to the countryside of Buckingham-
shire, England) Peddler’s Village evolved from
the fertile imagination of area native Earl
Jamison. The beauty of Bucks County, home to
James A. Michener and Pearl Buck, has inspired
New Hope School of Impressionist artists and
lured such literary greats as Moss Hart, Oscar
Hammerstein, George S. Kaufman, and Dorothy
Parker, who made Bucks County their home.
Jamison was inspired to share the beauty and
artistic legacy of the area with a broader public.
It began with the purchase of a chicken farm
in the 1950s, which Jamison transformed into a
storybook village: Brick walkways wind through
gardens of native plants and stone buildings,
while a water wheel churns over a rippling brook
dotted with stone bridges. But the genius of
Jamison’s design is its timelessness. Peddler’s
Village may be a work of artifice, but it feels like
it’s been a fixture of Bucks County for centuries.
However quaint its ambience, Peddler’s Village
Bucks County, Pennsylvania
Chester County’s
Brandywine Valley

484.770.8550
brandywinevalley.com
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Then Chester County’s Brandywine Valley
is the place to be this summer.
Downtown Phoenixville is home to Blobfest,
a weekend-long street party, July 11–13, dedi-
cated to the cult horror film The Blob. The
campy 1958 movie was filmed around Phoenix-
ville, though the amoeba-like alien star threat-
ens not Phoenixville but nearby Downingtown.
For more than a dozen years, Bridge Street’s
landmark Colonial Theater has been the hub
for all things Blob, with costume contests,
reenactments of scenes from the film, and
an amateur filmmaking contest.
If you’ve got pedals, or just enjoy the excite-
C
alling all movie, cycling , and mush-
room fans: The Main Streets of the
Brandywine Valley are your summer
destination for festivals as unique as
the towns that host them.
Feeling Festive?
191 usairwaysmag.com JUNE 2014
Clockwise from left:
the Colonial Theatre in
Phoenixville; Kennett
Square, the “Mush-
room Capital of the
World;” the Iron Hill
Twilight Criterium in
West Chester
ment of them, don’t
miss the Iron Hill
Twilight Criterium on
August 2, when bi-
cycles take over down-
town West Chester.
This year marks the
10th anniversary of the
event, which brings
crowds to Gay and High streets. The main attrac-
tion is the professional cyclists who speed through
the streets at sunset at up to 35 miles per hour.
Kennett Square is, proudly, the “Mush-
room Capital of the World;” 65 percent of
U.S. mushrooms are grown here. Naturally,
there’s a celebration surrounding the dis-
tinction: the Mushroom Festival, Septem-
ber 6–7. Tour a mushroom farm, stock up
and eat all the mushrooms you can. And be
sure to try mushroom ice cream at local
favorite La Michaocana Ice Cream.
P
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A
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The picturesque Brandywine countryside inspires
the artists that flock to this area BY JOANN GRECO
The Brandywine Conservancy & Museum of
Art is committed to exploring the intersection
of the area’s natural and painterly splendors.
This summer, it enhances that dual mission
with an exhibition of 45 works drawn from
private and public collections as well as the
Brandywine River Museum of Art’s own hold-
ings.
Lure of the Brandywine: A Story of Land Con-
servation and Artistic Inspiration (June 7 through
August 10) showcases works like Andrew Wyeth’s
D
efined by rolling green hills and a mean-
dering river, the Brandywine Valley in
Chester County has long served as a
picturesque inspiration, most notably
for three generations of Wyeth artists.
Landscape with Tree, William T. Richards’ The
Valley of the Brandywine, and Jasper Cropsey’s
Autumn on the Brandywine River.
Later in August, the museum unveils
Exalted Nature: The Real and Fantastic World
of Charles Burchfield, co-organized with the
Burchfield Penney Art Center in Buffalo.
Known for his luminous watercolor technique,
Burchfield also took nature as his subject,
lending his own distinctively modern touch to
a familiar genre.
In addition to presenting special exhibi-
tions, the museum has an outstanding collec-
tion of American art and offers tours of the
studios of illustrator N.C. Wyeth and his son,
Andrew, as well as the Kuerner Farm, which
served as the subject and inspiration for nearly
1,000 of Andrew’s works, beginning with his
earliest painting of the farm in 1932 at the age
of 15.
A Creative
Conservancy
190 JUNE 2014 usairwaysmag.com
Brandywine
Conservancy &
Museum of Art
U.S. Rt. 1
Chadds Ford, PA
610.388.2700
brandywine.org
George A.
Weymouth (b.
1936), Indian
Hanna, 1990,
Collection
Brandywine
River Museum
of Art.
192 JUNE 2014 usairwaysmag.com 193 usairwaysmag.com JUNE 2014
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I
n 1728, John Bartram, a Quaker farmer,
planted a garden on the banks of the
Schuylkill River, becoming the first to
cultivate hundreds of native species
gathered from all over the colonies.
Bartram shipped the seeds of his discoveries
across the Atlantic, filling Europe’s gardens
with New World magnolias and azaleas, sugar
maples and sumacs.
Today, nearly 300 years later, Bartram’s
Garden still blooms on its original site, its 45
idyllic acres planted with many of the same
species John Bartram collected. But his lasting
legacy is far larger: Thousands of acres of
public gardens have grown in and around
Philadelphia.
Philadelphia is America’s Garden Capital
— for good reason and in every season.
Bursting in
Blooms
From left: Bartram’s
Garden, Longwood
Gardens
With 31 gardens within 30 miles of Center
City, the region has the greatest concentration
of public gardens in the country, earning it the
moniker “America’s Garden Capital.”
A tour of Philadelphia’s gardens is a peek
into the region’s past, its present, and its future.
Many of the majestic trees of the 92-acre
Morris Arboretum have flourished there for
more than a century, including the arboretum’s
bender oak, which spreads 90 feet at the gateway
to the gardens and is estimated to be 250 years
old. Opening this month, a new 86-acre Mead-
ow Garden at Longwood Gardens serves as both
an ode to the past and a fresh look toward the
future — where diverse habitats, wildlife, undu-
lating fields of colors, textures, and lush wetlands
integrate with walking trails and a restored farm-
house. And in the interactive gardens of Cam-
den Children’s Garden, a new generation learns
to love the natural beauty of the region.
For visitors and locals alike, the region’s
gardens offer a variety of experiences:
The Arboretum at the Barnes
Foundation
MERION
Twelve-acre former private estate featuring
rose, peony, and fern collections, and more
than 3,000 specimens of woody plants.
Awbury Arboretum
PHILADELPHIA
19th-century Quaker estate with 55 acres of
English-style landscape, gardens, ponds, and
woodland trails.
Bartram’s Garden
PHILADELPHIA
America’s oldest living botanical garden, with
45 acres of plantings.
Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve
NEW HOPE
A 134-acre site of woods, meadows, a pond, and
a creek filled with native plants.
Brandywine Conservancy and Museum
of Art
CHADDS FORD
Wildflower and native plant gardens plus a
museum featuring American art, including
works by three generations of Wyeths.
Cabrini College Campus
RADNOR
Native woodland with grand trees surround the
112-acre campus.
Camden Children’s Garden
CAMDEN, NEW JERSEY
Four-and-a-half acres of interactive gardens and
a butterfly house.
Visit 31 Gardens Within 30 Miles
194 JUNE 2014 usairwaysmag.com 195 usairwaysmag.com JUNE 2014
Centennial Arboretum Horticulture
Center
FAIRMOUNT PARK
27 acres of landscape in the heart of west Phila-
delphia, with trees and shrubs from Asia, Eu-
rope, and North America.
Chanticleer
WAYNE
35-acre pleasure garden that displays the beauty
of the art of horticulture. Highlights include
water and ruin gardens.
Hagley Museum and Library
WILMINGTON, DELAWARE
Located on 235 acres along the banks of the
Brandywine River, it’s the former site of the
gunpowder works founded by E. I. du Pont.
Haverford College Arboretum
HAVERFORD
The 216-acre campus is home to more than
two miles of nature trails, a duck pond, an
18-acre pine arboretum, and small Asian
and perennial display gardens.
Henry Botanic Garden
GLADWYNE
This historic garden features plants growing
naturalistically in the woodland and hillside
landscape.
Henry Schmieder Arboretum
DOYLESTOWN
Mature trees, native woodland, and designed
gardens blend with Georgian architecture of
the Delaware Valley College campus.
The Highlands Mansion & Gardens
FORT WASHINGTON
A late 18th-century Georgian mansion on 44
acres with a formal garden and 9 outbuildings.
Hortulus Farm Garden
WRIGHTSTOWN
A 100-acre 18th-century farmstead and nursery
with 30 acres of formal gardens including pool
and lake gardens, and woodland walks.
Jenkins Arboretum & Gardens
DEVON
Over a mile of paved walkways lead through
native wildflowers and woodland gardens,
including a diverse collection of rhododen-
drons and azaleas.
Landscape Arboretum of Temple Uni-
versity Ambler
AMBLER
The 187-acre campus features a mix of natural
and designed landscapes including gardens of
culinary, dye, and medicinal herbs and dwarf
evergreens.
Lewis W. Barton Arboretum and Na-
ture Preserve
MEDFORD, NEW JERSEY
Landscaped grounds, courtyard and patio
gardens, exotic pines, wildflower meadows,
recreational areas, and natural woodlands
and wetlands.
Longwood Gardens
KENNETT SQUARE
One of the world’s great gardens showcasing
dazzling outdoor gardens and fountains as well
as indoor horticultural feats within a grand
Conservatory. Open 365 days a year.
Meadowbrook Farm
MEADOWBROOK
A 25-acre grand estate featuring a retail nurs-
ery, plants, public gardens, and more; part of
the Philadelphia Horiticultural Society family.
Morris Arboretum of the University
of Pennsylvania
PHILADELPHIA
92 acres of colorful gardens, winding paths,
bubbling fountains, and spectacular, mature
trees make up this historic landscape.
Mt. Cuba Center
HOCKESSIN, DELAWARE
Former estate of Mr. and Mrs. Lammot du Pont
Copeland; home to 500 acres of naturalistic
garden design and native plants.
Nemours Mansion & Gardens
WILMINGTON, DELAWARE
French gardens on 300-acre estate recalls the
splendors of Versailles in its fountains and
sculptures, with acres of forest.
Philadelphia Zoo
PHILADELPHIA
America’s first zoo includes diverse horticul-
tural collections of trees, shrubs, and plants.
Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore
College
SWARTHMORE
110 acres on Swarthmore’s campus features
4,000 kinds of plants, including seasonal cro-
cus, roses, and hollies.
Shofuso Japanese House and Garden
PHILADELPHIA
A traditional-style Japanese house in West
Fairmount Park, with a viewing garden, koi
pond and island, a tea garden, and a courtyard
garden.
Tyler Arboretum
MEDIA
A 650-acre historic arboretum with unique
P
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plant collections, state
champion trees, mead-
ow maze, and 17-plus
miles of hiking trail
Tyler Formal
Gardens of Bucks
County Commu-
nity College
NEWTOWN
A restored 1930s four-
tier formal garden
featuring pear tree
espalier, Stella Tyler’s
bronze sculptures,
marble fountains,
varied plantings,
and parterres.
Welkinweir
POTTSTOWN
An arboretum, gardens
and historic home at
the edge of a private
valley overlooking
ecologically diverse riparian, wetland and
meadow, and forest habitats.
Winterthur
WILMINGTON, DELAWARE
A du Pont family country place with a 60-acre
garden inspired by the Brandywine Valley
landscape, set amidst a 1,000-acre preserve
Wyck Historic House, Museum
and Garden
PHILADELPHIA
Historic Quaker home, featuring the oldest
rose garden in America and an heirloom
vegetable garden.
For More...
Visit greaterphiladelphia
gardens.org for more
information on America’s
Garden Capital.
Clockwise from lower left:
Morris Arboretum; Jenkins
Arboretum & Gardens;
Mt. Cuba Center; Scott
Arboretum, Chanticleer
P
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Earn Dividend Miles at Valley Forge Casino Resort.
Valley Forge Casino Resort is breaking new
ground by helping guests take to the air
through a new partnership with US Airways:
Now, casino points can be converted into
Dividend Miles.
The Dividend Miles program isn’t the only
standout feature of the casino resort. With
seven dining options from fine dining to ca-
sual, more than 200,000 square feet of banquet
space, celebrity chefs, comedy shows, a night-
club, and a first-class gaming area, Valley Forge
Casino Resort is the only Philadelphia area
casino that has it all.
T
hink about a dream casino vacation:
slots, roulette, blackjack, gourmet
dining, and top-shelf drinks. Then
pair all of that with a free flight to
your choice destination.
After a day of gaming,
enjoy casino entertain-
ment, from Mixed Mar-
tial Arts matches to coun-
try rock and off-Broadway
shows. Mosey on in to the
Deuces Wild Saloon,
where you can test your
skill atop a mechanical
bull and sip on specialty drinks served in a glass
boot. For a more mellow vibe, wind down at the
Cameo Lounge with a signature cocktail before
retiring to one of the resort’s 485 guest rooms
and suites.
“We’re certainly different, and we’re proud
of it,” says CEO Mike Bowman. “Play, dine,
and stay. Come gamble, have a great meal in
one of our restaurants, and stay the night.”
When it’s time to fly home, count up your
points and head to the player services desk at
the casino to redeem your US Airways flight for
your next adventure!
A Flying Game
197 usairwaysmag.com JUNE 2014
Clockwise from top:
Pacific Prime restaurant;
Valley Forge Casino hotel;
slot machines in the
gaming area
1160 First Avenue
Kind of Prussia, PA
610.354.8118
vfcasino.com
BY NICOLE ESPLIN
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B
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5
2
Traveling to Montgomery County reminds us of the
feeling we get when we explore something new.
In Valley Forge and Montgomery County,
Pennsylvania (the visitor center is just 30 miles
northwest of Philadelphia International Air-
port), there are a lot of ways to feel that free-
dom, from running or cycling along the rolling
hills of Valley Forge National Historical Park,
to meeting locals strolling along the main
streets of a dozen neighborhood towns.
This summer, relish your freedom — the
O
ften when traveling, it’s not the tick-
ing off of attractions that becomes
our memorable moments. What
lasts is the memory of the freedom
we felt exploring something new.
destination’s tourism board is inspiring visitors
to embark on new adventures big and small at
the region’s unique places and wide-open spac-
es. Seeking adventure? Try climbing a rope
bridge in the mountain treetops. Some un-
plugged family time? There’s kayaking and
go-carting. Relaxing and reconnecting? Visit a
museum, then enjoy a restaurant dine-around.
With accommodations to fit any budget and
themed itinerary ideas — from arts and culture
to history and shopping — that help provide the
inspiration, the real beauty, says Valley Forge
Tourism and Convention Board president Bill
Fitzgerald, is finding the experiences that en-
courage you to take a deep breath, relax, and
explore. Start packing for a memorable, educa-
tional, and exciting trip, then explore your free-
dom in Montgomery County.
Explore Your Freedom
196 JUNE 2014 usairwaysmag.com
1000 First Ave.
King of Prussia, PA
610.834.1550
valleyforge.org

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